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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can clydesdales ride any of these new carbon/aero wheelsets in the 40-50mm. profiles without a safety net? What determines a strong aero-carbon wheel from a not so? is it spoke count,hubs,quality of the carbon rim build??? or just everything working together well?
I have no intension of racing,just training rides.
thx's!:cool:
 

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I have been riding a set of DA 7850 C50's for the past two years without any problems. I weigh 230lbs. In general, though I would look at mfg. specs and most will state a rider weight limit. I also have a pair of DA c24's that have couple thousand miles on with no problems. I think shimano dura ace and mavic do not have weight limits on many of their wheels.
 

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I have been riding a set of DA 7850 C50's for the past two years without any problems. I weigh 230lbs. In general, though I would look at mfg. specs and most will state a rider weight limit. I also have a pair of DA c24's that have couple thousand miles on with no problems. I think shimano dura ace and mavic do not have weight limits on many of their wheels.
Just consider this: Wheels that don't have claimed weight limits don't necessarily mean that they don't have weight limits. If you don't claim a weight limit, you save a lot in liability. For example, I had a 250 lb. rider is riding a set of Zipp 404 Maxx and they fail, there is a liability. the wheels are rated at 275 lbs. I'm sure that there is some responsibility with a wheelset with no claimed weight limit, but the lines aren't as clear.
 

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Assuming you are talking about clinchers the only thing that would make them worse for heavy weights compared to lightweights is the heavier person would need more brake pressure to stop thus more prone to the problems that could potentially come alone with heavy braking.

Off course there are other factors that make a wheel stong enough, or not, (mentioned by Zen already) but those are not unique to carbon.
 

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I've typically seen higher weight thresholds on carbon rims than on aluminum ones. Of course, you'll have to take into account the spoke count/lacing and the hubs as well. However, I think the key factor to consider here is that you can bend aluminum back, but you can't bend back carbon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yes, that all sounds right on. The wheel in question is a Vuelta brand 20-radial laced front/24-2x drive and non-drive rear. Spokes are triple butted stainless bladed. Hubs generic. They don't post a rider limit unless you call and ask.
 

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I weigh 185 pounds and I wouldn't buy any wheel with a 24 spoke rear wheel. I want a wheel to last a few years, not just part of a season. I have had friends who weigh between 190 and 220 who have bought "silly light" wheels such as 16/20s that didn't last a month. They are now riding 24/28s that have lasted over a year.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
JimP...i take it you ride mostly in texas..just a guess!,you did'nt say you raced or not which would be a factor also that i would consider not having a low spoke count wheel.
I had a set of american classic cr420's that were 18f/20r and i rode those as a everyday wheel,but i avoid all of the pitfalls of the road,potholes,expansion joints,sewer covers etc.They stayed true for 2yrs or better but went with the bike when sold. The one common issue here on the forum is that as long as you don't beat on your carbon wonder wheels too much they should last quite awhile,sometimes we get lucky and get a good deal and the wheels hold up ok. I've been lucky enough too fall (no pun intended) into that category...but i will try not to push that envelope too hard....for what it is worth these wheels according to some on here are real BOAT ANCHORS!,maybe with that weight wherever it is may be a plus.If it has to do with the build,then ahoy mate!..i can live with that.
 

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I used a set of Zipp 101's (18 front, 20 rear) while dropping from 210 to 185 lbs. The rear spokes kept popping and losing tension. Once I retrued the wheel and tightened the spokes all around, I had no further problems. I have also used Shamal Ultra 2-ways and, more pertinent to your question, Zipp 303's without any difficulties while around 185-190 lbs. I chose the 303s because of their 24 spoke rear wheel and reputation for durability over the spring classics.
 

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I weigh 185 pounds and I wouldn't buy any wheel with a 24 spoke rear wheel. I want a wheel to last a few years, not just part of a season. I have had friends who weigh between 190 and 220 who have bought "silly light" wheels such as 16/20s that didn't last a month. They are now riding 24/28s that have lasted over a year.
I've weighed between 230-260 for the past couple if years while riding Mavic Cosmic Carbones...over 12,000 miles on them. One broken spoke, but I think that was because of the idiot that built the rear around the PowerTap I bought for it. I had someone else rebuild it the right way and it's been great.
 

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I've seen that FFWD make some of their wheels in a "Control" version with 24/28 spokes instrad of the standard 20/24. Meant for heavier riders and sprinters.

Check out the wheels preferred by Mark Cavendish for targeted races. Not light, but strong and stiff. Over the years he's mainly used Zipp rims and lots of round spokes.
 

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I've got a set of Cosmic Carbones that are ancient. I've ridden them from 210-240# and never had an issue. Just a few years ago, people were racing cyclocross on them. They have an aluminum rim which eliminates the braking issues, but otherwise they're low spoke count and the carbon is a fairing and the spokes are anchored in the alloy rim. I've been somewhat intriqued by November wheels, they're built in the US of foreign parts and list rider weight limits and recommendations in the description.
 

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What is FFWD ? spell these abbreviations out for us common folk.

I've seen that FFWD make some of their wheels in a "Control" version with 24/28 spokes instrad of the standard 20/24. Meant for heavier riders and sprinters.

Check out the wheels preferred by Mark Cavendish for targeted races. Not light, but strong and stiff. Over the years he's mainly used Zipp rims and lots of round spokes.
 

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Fast Forward Wheel Design of The Netherlands. Can be seen on Vacansoleil-DCM bikes.
 
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