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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I am going to build up a TT frame from ebay this winter. I am not sure what I will use for a frame, but in general the whole operation will be on the cheaper side of things. I am looking for a quick run down in order or aero importance so I can prioritize the build basically. So, spend more money where? The variables are frame, wheels, fork, bar setup, and then components. I've already been using a nerd helmet, aero bars, and gotten some help with a decent position (and will hopefully get some more next spring with more training and racing time). Another frame question would be does position (i.e. geometry) matter a bunch more than aero sculpting? It seems like an Al frame is generally a lot cheaper and will get me into the same more aero fit.

Second ?, I figure if I want to be fast on a TT bike I need to ride it, a lot. Is there any reason not to put in winter trainer time on a TT bike, other than maybe feeling like your getting a kick in the junk all the time?

Thanks
D
 

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First priority is getting a proper fit on the bike that gives the best combination of power output to aerodynamics. If you can't do it yourself...spend money to get somebody else to get you in the proper position. Your position on the bike is going to be by far the biggest aero improvement on the bike...but if done wrong can actually cost you time over longer distances.

Beyond that, an aero helmet and skinsuit would come next with some good shoe covers are the next best cost/aero options.

After that then get an aero cover for the rear wheel and if you have any money left over get a deep dish front wheel. If you can afford it get a true rear disc.

You can save a lot of money on wheels by shopping on Craigs list or E-Bay.

As for the fork...any aero fork will suit your purposes well enough. For aero bars, go with whats comfortable and has a fair amount of adjustment. Again, when it comes to bar getting into a good aero position that allows for maximum power is more important than the equipment it's self.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for all the help. Any leads/suggestions for a frame? The Moto nemesis is pretty cheap on ebay, looks plent aero in tubing shapes, and has an actual, real-deal steep geometry.
 

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Ghost234 said:
The gold standard is the P3 by Cervelo. Of course, that is very expensive, but it worth it if you can afford it.
:rolleyes:

The only standard is the randomly-applied UCI rulebook. Pointing at a specific bike as a "gold standard" is a pointless effort. From what I understand, Trek makes good TT bikes (and Specialized, Felt, Giant...).

Bang for the buck TT bike build:
Work on flexibility and core strength.
Build up a relatively aero aluminum TT frame. Make sure you leave plenty of room for adjustment.
Invest in a good TT fitting to find the best compromise between power and aerodynamics, then adjust the bike accordingly.
Ride the bike about once a week (or more) to adjust to it and fine-tune your position.
Tweak your cable routing to minimize drag.
Perhaps invest in a rear wheel cover if wind conditions allow.
 

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I agree with the wookie's statements.

If you're looking to save $, use your current wheel set on both bikes. Invest in a good fit and position. Skin suits and shoe covers are pretty cheap in the grand scheme of things.

For wheels, you can always look on your local Craigs List because there can be lots of dudes who go all out for their bucket list triathlon. Sometimes they quit after a tri or two, so the gear is often in good shape.
 

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dmabraham said:
Thanks for all the help. Any leads/suggestions for a frame? The Moto nemesis is pretty cheap on ebay, looks plent aero in tubing shapes, and has an actual, real-deal steep geometry.
Any frame that allows you to get into the best position....again, one that gives the best combination of power to aerodynamics....will work just fine.

Cheaper E-Bay bikes will work fine as will other cheaper TT frames...as long as they fit.

I use a 4 year old aluminum Fuji Aloha 1.0 for my TT bike and for all intents and purposes...it works great for my needs. I've been able to run sub 56 minute 40k TT's on it without any problems...so the limiting factor is the engine, not the bike...and it's not an expensive bike :)
 

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dmabraham said:
So I am going to build up a TT frame from ebay this winter. I am not sure what I will use for a frame, but in general the whole operation will be on the cheaper side of things. I am looking for a quick run down in order or aero importance so I can prioritize the build basically. So, spend more money where? The variables are frame, wheels, fork, bar setup, and then components. I've already been using a nerd helmet, aero bars, and gotten some help with a decent position (and will hopefully get some more next spring with more training and racing time). Another frame question would be does position (i.e. geometry) matter a bunch more than aero sculpting? It seems like an Al frame is generally a lot cheaper and will get me into the same more aero fit.

Second ?, I figure if I want to be fast on a TT bike I need to ride it, a lot. Is there any reason not to put in winter trainer time on a TT bike, other than maybe feeling like your getting a kick in the junk all the time?

Thanks
D
Any cheap frame that fits you and will let you set up you aero position will work. the times I was fastest in teh TT i used my old road bike withe a non set back seat post and teh saddle shoved forward so a specific TT frame is not nessary. The big issues is getting the position dialed and comfortable - you should not feel like you getting kicked in the nuts when you ride you should not go numb you should be in as aero position as you can be and still be "comfortable" (with in reason) and make good power you will be hurting yourself enough without the added pain and discraction of a bike that hurts you just riding it easy. Next up is the helmet and shoe covers and some aero wheels as aero as you can afford. The biggest saving you can make is a disc cover on the rear its just as aero as a true disc just heavier and the added bonus is taht you can cut the cover to go around a Power Tap hub which is what I think was the biggest advance I made in TTing learning proper pacing.
 

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Alex_Simmons/RST said:
Must be pretty windy your way. I rode a TT in 60km/h cross winds last month with a rear disk cover. It's the front wheel you have to worry about in high winds, not the rear.
For the most part, unless you're extremely light weight. :D Given that weight is on the rear wheel and it's in a fixed position, much less influence than the front wheel. With the front wheel steering and less weight on it, yup.
 
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