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Calm like a Bomb..
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I have recently been considering getting some clip on AERO/TT bars. I pretty much ride by myself all of the time and was wondering if its a good investment. My rides are down pretty straight bike trails along the road so I was thinking being able to get into a more aero position would be good. I often heard people don't recommend these if riding in groups since it can be dangerous but thought since I ride alone it may be good for me?

Thoughts?
 

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Failboat Captian
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Depends. Around here, I see lots of guys on comfort bikes with riser bars with clip-ons. Just don't, okay?!

If you are riding to get a workout, you're defeating the purpose. Give your arms and chest the little bit of use you can, and the wind provides some resistance to give you a little better workout. Otherwise, hop on a trainer - there's no wind to fight.
 

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Adorable Furry Hombre
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Also, unless your speed relative to the wind is over 18-20mph, you really don't gain anything aerodynamically-over a good drop bar position

That being said, they do give your regular riding muscles a break, and a break for your hands-and provide a different workout.

Long, empty, and *WELL* paved trails are where to use them---never in packs. You cannot make sudden movements while riding them, and you have to be good at bike control already--as you steer with your elbows. As your contact point with the hadlebars if FAR closer to the headset/center of the bike--steering is also much more sensitive/twitchy-to any movement, intentional or not.
 

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But why

stunzeed said:
So I have recently been considering getting some clip on AERO/TT bars. I pretty much ride by myself all of the time and was wondering if its a good investment. My rides are down pretty straight bike trails along the road so I was thinking being able to get into a more aero position would be good. I often heard people don't recommend these if riding in groups since it can be dangerous but thought since I ride alone it may be good for me?

Thoughts?
Unless you are racing, then the point of the aerobars would be? They can make you faster, but that would be significant how? If you want added comfort, you could argue that they take weight off your hands, but that comes at the expense of poor handling and, if you don't get extension brake levers, slow response on the brakes.
 

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Kerry Irons said:
Unless you are racing, then the point of the aerobars would be? They can make you faster, but that would be significant how? If you want added comfort, you could argue that they take weight off your hands, but that comes at the expense of poor handling and, if you don't get extension brake levers, slow response on the brakes.

I'm planning to run them. In FL, we have very long, straight flat roads. Their as godsend for these kind of conditions.
 

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Calm like a Bomb..
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I was thinking more towards helping with longer rides. Allowing me to switch around when i get ired as well as to utilize different muscles....am I missing something or will this not help with that
 

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stunzeed said:
I was thinking more towards helping with longer rides. Allowing me to switch around when i get ired as well as to utilize different muscles....am I missing something or will this not help with that
No, that is a very good reason for using clip-on aerobars. For double or triple century rides, having an extra position really helps me with pain in my wrists/hands/neck...
 

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Room 1201 said:
You cannot make sudden movements while riding them, and you have to be good at bike control already--as you steer with your elbows. As your contact point with the hadlebars if FAR closer to the headset/center of the bike--steering is also much more sensitive/twitchy-to any movement, intentional or not.

You don't steer with your elbows, you steer with your hands you just use different muscles. Once you're used to riding in them, you can make very sudden, controlled movements in them. Your contact point will be closer to the center steering axis, with your weight on the forearm pads slightly behind, however with a good set-up you can have plenty safe steering.

Since the last point is correct, you'll waver more if you're pulling in the front of a pack because your whole body isn't holding the bars steady the way you would if you were in the drops. You can steer with your upper body by leaning and pivoting on the axis.
 

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Get 'em. They're awesome. I'm not much of a group rider, and when I ride with friends I usually take the lead, so crowding is not much of an issue. I did use them when I was tired, but once you get down on them, it feels like you can concentrate so much more of your strength into your legs. Suddenly everything is a race against the clock. So awesome.
 
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