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in lance's training book "The Lance Armstrong Performance Program", he says that aero bars should be pointed slightly upward and that if they are angled down even the smallest amount it causes you to be just as un-aero as you are when you aren't using aero bars at all. THE PREDICAMENT: i was reading up on lance's NEW tt bike and it says that his new position has his aero bars pointing slightly downward, like Ullrich. which way is better? up or down? why?
 

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Whatever Lance is doing in the TdF is what's better. He's very detail oriented. He may just be playing around with different positions right now. By the time we see him in the TdF he will have dialed it in.
 

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Here's the theory behind the recommendation

The idea behind having your aero bars tipped up is to prevent there being an open "pocket" created by your forearms and chest. If the bars are tipped up, the forearms and hands tend to "close" with your head and so the air flows around your body. In practice, there are a lot of factors that can affect your drag coefficient, and you can really only get at the best position (for you) with a combination of wind tunnel tests and actual time trials. Unless you're racing at the top levels and there's a lot of money riding on it, you can do a pretty reasonable job of finding your best position with by knowing speed and heart rate, or better yet speed and power. The position that gives you the fastest speed with the least power/lowest HR is the one to use. It may be that the most aero position so constricts your breathing or doesn't allow full use of your muscles that it is actually slower.
 

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Note how curved his back is! The theory is to keep your back flat - if you can. Also, the grips on the aerobars is very flat - not as upright as other bars - I would think that is more a matter of comfort. The best aero position is very comfort dependent. If the TT is only a few miles, you can be very aero, very uncomfortable, and get away with it. But, if it is a longer TT, you must get some compromise between optimal aero and comfort to be able to produce the fastest time.
 
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