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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

So I have (had?) a 2012 Giant TCR Comp 1 that I love dearly.

However, last night, I had the misfortune of getting into an accident with a minivan. He's at fault, however it may have to go through my home insurance depending on the outcome of all that fun stuff.

Regardless, home insurance has offered to pay replacement value of the frame+rear wheel+a few other little things that perished, less a $500 deductible that the drivers insurance company will hopefully cover.

So, naturally, here is my opportunity to upgrade.

The wheels I planned to upgrade to carbon clinchers in the future anyways, since that was part of the long-term plan. Now I just have an excuse to do it sooner! But as for the rest?

So here's the question: Is it worth upgrading the frame as well? The bike is mostly equipped with ultegra already, however would a TCR advanced frame, or some other frame (Cervelo, drool) be too much for the components of the bike? Would it be a "waste"?

Are bike components made to work together with the frame?

Thanks in advance!
 

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This is the perfect excuse to try and land the bicycle of your dreams. If the money is there, do it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well, the money is "there", persay (hellloooo savings), yet I'm not entitled to a whole new bike. Just the value of the frame, rear wheel, and some other parts.

If they had written off the entire bike I'd go for the Cervelo S5 hands down. But they didn't, so I don't know if it's worth getting my dream frame, then slowly upgrading the substandard components (handlebars, saddle, etc), or sticking with a frame that meets the standard of my current components. Hmmmmmm...
 

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I'd take this opportunity to get the best frame you can afford to get without impoverishing yourself (you can't eat a frame and it won't keep the rain off), since you can upgrade parts later and if the 'replacee' is still serviceable, keep for a spare. I've been told by just about everybody since I've gotten back on a bike a couple of years ago, that upgrading is expensive so do it as little as possible by going as high as you can the first time.
 

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Ultegra is more than fine for any frame out there (except maybe a MacLaren Venge or something). Go for the dream frame and upgrade as you can if you decide it's necessary. Oh, and in the Carbon clincher world, Zipp 303s freakin' rock - not noisy under hard braking (with a little pad position tweaking), don't overheat (and I'm a relatively big guy) even on long, steep descents, the wider rims corner like on rails, the carbon really smooths out the ride, they spin-up noticeably fast, all good stuff.
 

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Are bike components made to work together with the frame?
The issues you could run into are mainly the seatpost, bottom bracket, and front derailleur. Those tend to vary the most from model to model. So you might want to keep those in mind when shopping around for your new frame and look for compatibility.

Absolutely upgrade to whatever your budget allows. And your ultegra components will go well with whatever frame you choose. I think you'll find the price on a new frame up a couple levels isn't a huge difference.
 

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The issues you could run into are mainly the seatpost, bottom bracket, and front derailleur. Those tend to vary the most from model to model. So you might want to keep those in mind when shopping around for your new frame and look for compatibility.

Absolutely upgrade to whatever your budget allows. And your ultegra components will go well with whatever frame you choose. I think you'll find the price on a new frame up a couple levels isn't a huge difference.
+1 ^ Excellent Advice! :thumbsup:
 

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the s5 is hideous but I say go chase your wildest dreams while you're in a somewhat workable position. You will need to account for swapping over stuff (so new cables and housing) with the adaptations mentioned.

I'm one to tell you away from carbon clinchers mainly because of braking. I'd just choose the reliability of Aluminum all day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
So I'm just getting back from Giant. They offer a crash protection plan. For a TCR advanced 0, with seatpost, fork, and frame it'll be $690. Cost minus 20%.

So now I have a debate. Do I avoid insurance completely and pay the $690+wheel true+2hrs for the swap or do I try another dealer to get the insurance for the full value of $1800 or so. However, I don't know if that's ethical? With a $500 deductible, it's barely worthwhile to claim through insurance for just the Giant frame swap.

Furthermore, if I pay for the crash program, I could take the driver to small claims court. I always wanted to be a lawyer, this will be my opportunity to try :p

It's tempting to upgrade, but I don't know if I want to play this whole insurance game. Furthermore, with the frame upgrade I'll be riding by Wednesday. With insurance, it could be weeks.

I think I'll focus on my midterms this weekend, and then mull this over on Sunday.

THANK YOU FOR YOUR INPUT EVERYONE! It is much appreciated! I'd love to get an upgraded frame, however it seems that ethics and simplicity of the whole ordeal will play a bigger role.
 

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Doesn't the insurance company get the last say about the final dollar amount to which you're entitled? How does working with another dealer change anything with your insurance company? I mean, your 2012 Giant TCR Advanced was worth a certain finite amount of dollars (X). You have a $500 deductible. Therefore, according to my estimation, if X-500=Y, then you're only entitled to a bike that costs a total of X amount of dollars. You'll pay the $500 and the insurance company will pay the balance of Y. OTOH, if you pay for the frame swap, you're going to pay more dollar wise, because you're not only paying for the frame, but also 2hrs of labor, as well as the cost of truing the wheels. Well, that's too much! I'd rather pay an additional $300 or $400, and get something nicer, that's brand new...That means, instead of paying $500 for an $1800 bike, you could very well pay $900 for a $2200 bike! That's not too shabby! :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
^^Zeet, you're on the ball.

I spoke with a lawyer, I need to file a police report and it should hopefully not affect my insurance rates and premiums, which is a big fear of mine!

I will get a quote for retail value of the bike, and go shopping from there,

Thanks again all!
 

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I agree, why buy a new frame that is not your dream bike? Upgrade parts later as needed.
 

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I'm not sure exactly what Zeet is saying, but I think he is mainly correct.

I'm assuming you are going through your homeowner's insurance. If so they are responsible for paying for the full cost of replacement or repair.

Here is my suggestion.

go to your shop and get an estimate for the full cost of repair. This would be the retail price of your replacement frame plus any necessary parts. You did not mention which parts you need, but in an accident that can break a frame I would be sure to have the shop look at the fork as well if they have not already done so.

If they cannot tell if the fork is safe to ride this should be noted on the estimate and added to the cost. If you are looking at the shifter's and only one is damaged, make sure that the replacement matches the undamaged one. Your claim should also include any sales taxes and the cost of transferring and installing the new parts. This is true even if you choose to do the work yourself.

Once you have an estimate, you provide it to the claim representative. The claim rep. may look for better prices, and many large insurance companies have programs where you can buy direct from an dealer who has negotiated a discount available to their insureds with claims.

Once the amount is established, the insurance company may or may not decide to just pay for a new replacement bike which would be the current retail value of what you have now. To the insurance company this is strictly dollars and cents. If it is less expensive to repair, that's how they go. If it is cheaper to replace, that's how they will proceed.

When a homeowners insurer pays a replacement claim, they usually pay an actual cash value amount up front. This will be based on a depreciated amount. If you do not replace the bike this is all you get. If you replace the bike with something more expensive they will pay up to the replacement or repair bill, and you pay the difference.

This is all subject to your deductible, which comes off the top.

Once you have settled with your homeowner's company do not make the mistake of thinking you can pursue the claim against the responsible driver without the consent of your homeowner's insurance company. Once they pay the claim, they have the right to proceed against the responsible driver. State laws differ, but in many if you accept payment for your deductible either through a small claim court action, or directly with the driver's insurance company with a release, you have limited the insurance company's right to seek reimbursement. You don't want to get into this situation. Ask the company before you take any action.

If the insurance company settles with the driver's insurance company in whole or part, most states require them to share the recovery with you in proportion to the amount they paid, and the amount of your deductible.

As to whether you decide to forgo the insurance claim and go against the driver in small claims court, is a decision you can make. I would not recommend it. If you lose or collect less than you think you should, most times you will not be able to submit the claim later to your carrier. My recommendation is that a bird in the hand is better etc. Once again ask the insurance company before you start on this path.

I would not worry too much about the rates. Homeowner's insurance has an entirely different rating plan than auto. Check with your agent, but it's unlikely that this will have any effect
 

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Go for some carbon clinchers all the way... Just make sure your hubs look like this and you'll never have to sweat braking...



I say go for the Cervelo or whatever your dream frame is. Look at complete bikes too, sometimes they come out cheaper once you sell off all your old stuff, and you don't have to sweat compatibility issues.
 

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I'm one to tell you away from carbon clinchers mainly because of braking. I'd just choose the reliability of Aluminum all day.
1000% agreed! in addition to what you said, the weight is virtually the same as well between decent carbon and aluminum rims.
 

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If the minivan driver is at fault I don't see why you would be spending any of your money or using your own insurance to cover replacement parts.
True. If the minivan guy is at fault, take it up with his insurance company. It will certainly take more time, but you'll not have to spend any cash. Of course, you could also use the option of taking him to small claims court. That too will take time. However, by using your homeowners insurance, it's quite possible that you could just pay your deductible, and be on your way. Later, you might be able to get your deductible reimbursed, after your insurance company sues the minivan owner. Therefore, use of your home owner's insurance will most likely get you rolling again, faster.
 
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