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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I only ride three times per week so I usually ‘empty the tank’ each time. My average ride last year was 46 miles in length. I try to particularly hammer the hills to incorporate some high intensity interval training into every ride.

Often I’ll get back and feel great, enjoying a nice endorphin high and a complete mental ‘clean-out’. Sometimes I do a meditation soon after a ride which helps accentuate this feeling of relaxation. This state can last for a couple of hours but then I’ll often begin to feel agitated and restless for some reason. Counterintuitively, I sometimes find it difficult to sleep that night. It’s almost like a delayed bonk feeling because my thinking isn’t always clear. I rarely feel like I’m running out of energy during the ride, however.

I’ve heard reports from other cyclists of this phenomena sometimes happening. It’s not the case with every ride but particularly I’ve noticed in the cooler weather that it happens quite a bit. I assume that I’m putting out a greater effort to ride similar courses that require less energy in warmer weather.

My health in general is excellent. I’m not falling sick from over-exertion and I don’t think I’m over-training because I don’t suffer from burn-out nor steadily declining performance.

I try to be very conscious of hydrating during and after my rides. I tend to have a small snack shortly after a ride and then have a bigger meal within about two hours.

Is this just part of high intensity cycling? Or is there something I can alter in my post-ride routine that would alleviate this? I’m not inclined to want to do shorter or less intense rides.
 

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Please explain your agitation and how you are restless? Maybe just give us some more symptoms

Do you always work out at the same time? I know i would get anxious or ramped up the same time of day when i switched my runs. The bodies 24hr clock will basically preload for a workout at 4pm if you are consistant about working out at that time.

Maybe take a long walk or a puff and meditate to npr. Its winter so its impossible to not get restless when your vitiman d level is obfuscated.
 

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I only ride three times per week so I usually ‘empty the tank’ each time. My average ride last year was 46 miles in length. I try to particularly hammer the hills to incorporate some high intensity interval training into every ride.

Often I’ll get back and feel great, enjoying a nice endorphin high and a complete mental ‘clean-out’. Sometimes I do a meditation soon after a ride which helps accentuate this feeling of relaxation. This state can last for a couple of hours but then I’ll often begin to feel agitated and restless for some reason. Counterintuitively, I sometimes find it difficult to sleep that night. It’s almost like a delayed bonk feeling because my thinking isn’t always clear. I rarely feel like I’m running out of energy during the ride, however.

I’ve heard reports from other cyclists of this phenomena sometimes happening. It’s not the case with every ride but particularly I’ve noticed in the cooler weather that it happens quite a bit. I assume that I’m putting out a greater effort to ride similar courses that require less energy in warmer weather.

My health in general is excellent. I’m not falling sick from over-exertion and I don’t think I’m over-training because I don’t suffer from burn-out nor steadily declining performance.

I try to be very conscious of hydrating during and after my rides. I tend to have a small snack shortly after a ride and then have a bigger meal within about two hours.

Is this just part of high intensity cycling? Or is there something I can alter in my post-ride routine that would alleviate this? I’m not inclined to want to do shorter or less intense rides.
On an extremely superficial level, it sounds like mismanaged nutrition and blood sugar. Have you read Nutrition for Endurance Athletes? Get a copy if you haven't read it and then come back and ask if it persists.
 

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Blood sugar is my first guess too. Need to make sure you get in the sugar after rides like that.

Otherwise it's fairly normal to be more awake later on during days of exercise due to elevated EPOC.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I was thinking blood sugar as well. Perhaps I need to eat more sugary foods after such efforts. I tend to eat "healthy" after rides but maybe it's the time to eat sugar.
 

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I was thinking blood sugar as well. Perhaps I need to eat more sugary foods after such efforts. I tend to eat "healthy" after rides but maybe it's the time to eat sugar.
no this is not the answer.

go to your doctor if this persists.
 

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I get the same way if I haven't had enough to eat before a high intensity ride. What I eat after is pretty important too. Its usually when I don't eat enough carbs but a sugary snack or drink can help as a quick fix. Sugary foods are certainly not the answer at least in my case though.
 

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What time of day do your rides occur? If your heart rate is too high as a result from your workout too close to bedtime, the symptoms you described may occur (especially not being able to sleep well).
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
What time of day do your rides occur? If your heart rate is too high as a result from your workout too close to bedtime, the symptoms you described may occur (especially not being able to sleep well).
I don’t usually ride late in the day. My Wednesday and Friday rides start in the early afternoon and my Sunday rides often being mid-morning. I agree that sleeping at night is proportionally affected by how late in the day you ride. I think the coffee analogy is a good one. It’s like that jittery feeling that you get when you’ve had a little too much coffee and you’re coming down from the caffeine high. I can practically feel my body’s metabolism revving like crazy even hours afterwards. I guess it just goes with the territory of intense workouts. A fantastic high sometimes followed by a bit of a “hangover”.

I think eating more on riding days - both before and after the ride - may ameliorate some of my symptoms.
 

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Come to think of it, I have noticed this as well. Except that with me, it appears to happen in warmer weather and particularly on hot day rides. It appears to happen after rides where my heart rate is elevated well into the 150s on flats for most of the last half of the ride or so, not just on the hills. In other words, rides where I am really pushing myself, rather than pacing myself to get what I would consider a more healthy 130-140 on flats and 150-170 on uphills.

Just my own observations.
 

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I don’t usually ride late in the day. My Wednesday and Friday rides start in the early afternoon and my Sunday rides often being mid-morning. I agree that sleeping at night is proportionally affected by how late in the day you ride. I think the coffee analogy is a good one. It’s like that jittery feeling that you get when you’ve had a little too much coffee and you’re coming down from the caffeine high. I can practically feel my body’s metabolism revving like crazy even hours afterwards. I guess it just goes with the territory of intense workouts. A fantastic high sometimes followed by a bit of a “hangover”.

I think eating more on riding days - both before and after the ride - may ameliorate some of my symptoms.
As a diabetic one of the 1st signs that my blood glucose is getting low is that jittery, I've had too much coffee, feeling.

Maybe a few more carbs when riding, loosen up the healthy eating a bit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Come to think of it, I have noticed this as well. Except that with me, it appears to happen in warmer weather and particularly on hot day rides. It appears to happen after rides where my heart rate is elevated well into the 150s on flats for most of the last half of the ride or so, not just on the hills. In other words, rides where I am really pushing myself, rather than pacing myself to get what I would consider a more healthy 130-140 on flats and 150-170 on uphills.

Just my own observations.
Are you maintaining the same intensity when you ride in colder weather? I’m attempting to generate similar watts to my warmer weather rides. My average speeds are much lower on identical routes but I attribute this to the increased demands of pushing through the denser cold air. I’d be curious if your difference is due to having less strenuous rides or whether your body has a different reaction to riding in the cold.
 

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Are you maintaining the same intensity when you ride in colder weather? I’m attempting to generate similar watts to my warmer weather rides. My average speeds are much lower on identical routes but I attribute this to the increased demands of pushing through the denser cold air. I’d be curious if your difference is due to having less strenuous rides or whether your body has a different reaction to riding in the cold.


It's hard to say. It feels like my intensity is higher in colder weather, but not sure if it is or if it's just perception. Breathing is definitely more labored in colder temps. Also, as the days get shorter in the fall, I ride less, so I'm not in as good shape as when the days are longer and I ride a few times a week after work.
 

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This happens to me sometimes. I know this will be hard but try doing some rides at a lower intensity and see if that helps. Riding at high intensity all the time may not be optimal for increasing your fitness. As far as doctors go they have no clue about this sort of thing unless it is something obvious like low iron or low thyroid, so it would still be good to get some tests run, even then its easy for them to overlook something.
 

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As a diabetic one of the 1st signs that my blood glucose is getting low is that jittery, I've had too much coffee, feeling.

Maybe a few more carbs when riding, loosen up the healthy eating a bit.
I get the same feeling about 4-5 hours after my dialysis treatments (I'm not diabetic, btw). Maybe I should try adding some sugar/starch in my meals after treatments.
 

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I always have one drink after a ride and it prevents me from have that same feeling plus it's a drink so it's...ummm...awesome.....An IPA or a 3 oz shot of whisky will fix you right up
 

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I am diabetic, and have experienced this. It was especially a problem when I first started cycling several years ago.

For me, I've dealt with it by using a more structured recovery feed process. This of course varies with the intensity of a ride, but right after a hard ride, your body is still working really hard to restore your exhausted glycogen supplies. A not-insigificant serving of easily digestible carbohydrate within 20-30 minutes of the ride ending is a good place to start. This can be in the form of a recovery drink/shake, or something you prepare yourself. Chocolate Milk has been popular for many years because of the ideal ratio of protein to carbohydrate, but some people don't deal with dairy well, especially with a 'hot' gut. Fruit juice, applessauce, maple syrup (good for electrolytes and has a relatively low glycemic index), etc... Also be sure you are getting plenty of fluids and electrolytes after a hard ride.

For me, after this initial intake of carbs, I usually will wait about 2 hours and then have a healthy meal with plenty of protein and little to no carbs (unless my muscles are still feeling rubbery, then maybe I'll add a few more carbs).

Everyone's body is different, and has different food tolerances and different digestive efficiencies (and inefficiencies). I would suggest experimenting with different foods and timings and see what works for you.

Edit: This is a great website for understanding macro and micro nutrient content, and glycemic index of many foods. It's also got a lot of good general nutrition information.
SELF Nutrition Data | Food Facts, Information & Calorie Calculator
 

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I get the same feeling about 4-5 hours after my dialysis treatments (I'm not diabetic, btw). Maybe I should try adding some sugar/starch in my meals after treatments.
I wouldn't know how you would deal with that. It makes sense to me, but it's also not my wheel house.

Have you talked to those performing your dialysis on the best way to deal with that?
 
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