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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,
I purchased 99 Allez sport 2 years ago and avrage 90 miles per week @ 18 mph. I told myself that if I rode well that I would upgrade. Welp now I am considering an upgrade to a 10 Roubaix Pro. I am 6'1" and 270 lbs. What kind of ride diff should I expect from the swap? I have test riden the carbon frame for a short spurt and it felt fine. Should I have to upgrade the stock wheels for my weight? Thanks in advance.
Current ride is Aluminum
CRANKSET: SPECIALIZED (52 x 42 x30), 172.5 mm
FRONT DERAILLEUR: SHIMANO ULTEGRA
REAR DERAILLEUR: SHIMANO ULTEGRA
SHIFTERS: SHIMANO ULTEGRA
BRAKES: SHIMANO ULTEGRA
CASETTE: SHIMANO ULTEGRA (12 X 23)
HANDLEBAR: CINELLI 42 CM (center TO center)
STEM: ALUMINUM (100 mm)
SADDLE: SPECIALIZED REVOLUTION
SEAT POST: RITCHEY
RIMS: MAVIC CXP21
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Was looking at the Roubaix because the price is quite fare and thinking that at 270 lbs I am not going to be much of a racer competing with the 180 out there. I have no issues on 40 mile tours with the Allez.
 

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TRB
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Being that I'm 6'2" and 280lbs I would first and foremost suggest that if you are going to a full CF bike that you upgrade your wheels. I had a set built for me here by someone 36 spoke front and rear for increased durability due to heavier set rider. I haven't had a single issue with them since I have put them on.

Only downfall is they are heavier however being hefty myself I really am not a weight weenie yet...key word is YET cause I plan to lose a lot of weight riding.

If you're interested in getting a custom set Valley Cyclist built mine and walked me thru the entire process he is reasonable with his pricing as well.

Now a friend of mine has an Allez and when I was shopping for bikes I almost bought a Roubaix Expert however I didn't cause IMO they felt sluggish they really didn't respond well, I then rode a Tarmac (Great Response), Trek Madone (Another amazing bike) and then finally I stumbled upon a 2009 Cervelo RS left over and that thing rode like a dream. I would try out other bikes in the same price range as the Roubaix that you're looking at you might be surprised at what you find. I'm not saying the Roubaix is a bad bike at all, I'm just saying for a guy my size I wanted a responsive bike, the model I rode wasn't what I was looking for.

Hope this helps.
Tim
 

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Rest when you're dead
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I am a big Specialized fan. I have a 07' S-Works Roubaix and a 09' Tarmac Pro. If your mostly a rec rider then get a higher end Roubaix. They do NOT hook up with Tarmac, but keep in mind the Tarmac's are full versus compact and I seriously doubt you want the full.

Get a higher end Roubaix. If you can look around your area see if you can find a year or two old S-Works and you'll never be sorry.
 

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Rest when you're dead
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Never considered that.....I'm 215 and I never feel like the bike is flexing, but that is a good point.
 

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my understanding is that the weight limit is higher on the frames themselves, and that carbon components such as stem, handlebars, and seatpost reduce the limit. At your weight, the Tarmac may be better as the Roubaix may be too flexy for you. If you want a more upright position on the Tarmac, get a stem with a higher upward angle.

If Sworker is talking about standard vs compact chain rings, my local LBS switched them out on my Tarmac at no charge.
 

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felix5150 said:
my understanding is that the weight limit is higher on the frames themselves, and that carbon components such as stem, handlebars, and seatpost reduce the limit. At your weight, the Tarmac may be better as the Roubaix may be too flexy for you. If you want a more upright position on the Tarmac, get a stem with a higher upward angle.

If Sworker is talking about standard vs compact chain rings, my local LBS switched them out on my Tarmac at no charge.
That document specifically says the limits are for the frames.

"The following information contains structural weight limits for frames,........"
 

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Pack Fodder.
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If you're seriously looking at making the jump to a carbon fiber bike, I would test ride bikes from a variety of brands.

I'm a bit lighter than you (OK, a lot- but still heavy for a rider), but I found the lower end Roubaix frames to be a bit on the squishy side for me. It was a nice bike for rougher streets and long, easy rides, but when I wanted the power to be there... it wasn't. That may be what you're looking for, and by no means was it a bad bike (especially the Rival build in the Saxo Bank paint scheme), but it wasn't the right bike for me.

As a heavier rider, I would look for a couple things when shopping for a bike.

First off, whatever wheels are on there are likely going to be less than optimal for your needs. A high spoke count wheel will provide better performance for you with only a slight penalty in weight. The stock wheelset should not be a deciding factor, when a handbuilt Open Pro/Ultegra wheelset will run you under $300.

In my opinion, a heavier rider should be on a wider tire (700x25 to 700x32). Makes for a nicer ride and you can run lower pressures. A lot of performance-oriented bikes can't handle a wider tire (fork clearance), so it's something that is good to check for. I usually run 25s, and they will rub on my BMC if the wheel goes out of true (or if I break a spoke). One of the things I like about the Ridley Orion is that there is plenty of clearance for that wide tire while still having solid performance.

When I test-ride a bike, I sometimes will bring my own wheelset to evaluate the bike. I make sure the wheel is true and the cassette is compatible and clean, and I have yet to find a bike store that minds me wearing down my own rubber on a test ride (some have done a once over on the wheelset to make sure it's good, though). This eliminates the stock wheelset from the equation, so I can compare apples to apples (or frameset to frameset, for that matter). I've seen too many otherwise great bikes muted by a sub-par wheelset.

If you haven't had a professional fit done, I would suggest it. I have a set of measurements that I transfer to each bike I test ride (within reason- no stem or handlebar swapping) so that I can evaluate the bike instead of the fit. Mainly it's saddle positioning/height.

I usually bring my own saddle and pedals, again to limit the number of variables.

Finally, I try to test ride a great variety of terrain, so that I get a feel for how the bike performs. Climbs, descents, twisty corners, grinding flatlands... that's the way to see what a bike can do.

A bike is a large investment (no matter what price rance you're looking at), and one that can have long-term impacts on your enjoyment of the sport. Taking the time to carefully evaluate your options is the best way to ensure a good match.
 

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Cycling induced anoesis
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Ack said:
That document specifically says the limits are for the frames.
That document does, but under the FAQ section, the following is stated.

(quote)
How much weight do your bikes handle?
Published 08/25/2009 11:19 AM | Updated 02/23/2010 03:32 PM
Question:
I'm a big guy who wants to start riding a Road Bike but I'm 265. What are the weight limits of each model?

Answer:
None of our bikes have a weight limit - not even our high end carbon fiber bikes. Some of our lightest weight carbon bars, seatposts, and stems have a weight limit of 240, however. If you purchase a bike with one of those parts on it, I suggest replacing them with an aluminum model, and you'll be good to go!
(end quote)

The bottom line is that in some instances the recommended weights limits are close (240 versus 275), but the two sources do offer slightly different recommendations.

I would suggest the OP contact Spec directly for clarification.
 

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Rest when you're dead
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That is what I was referring to...just make sure to switch them out before you roll the Tarmac off the lot, cause once you do then you pay for new rings.

I personally would call Specialized....I have both a Tarmac and Roubaix and if I had to own only one bike it would be Roubaix. I love the Tarmac, but on a century ride or a 5-6 Sunday ride with friends that is the preferred ride.

I would also get one of the higher levels of Specialized Carbon, level 9 or 10. These are in the Tarmac Pro and S-Works models.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks all for the imput. The Roubaix I am looking into is the Pro with the level 9 carbon and Dura-Ace. It may look pretty ugly, but I will take my MAVIC CXP21 wheels up to the store and test both the Tarmac Pro and the Roubaix Pro. I rarely am out of the saddle and of course hope to bring the weight down to the 240 mark. HAHA, sounds like I should just stay on the 99 Aluminum Aleez til I hit the 240.
 

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Ooh, that sounds nice!
Well... what you could do is "incentivize" (?) yourself again- maybe buy yourself some really good light-but-super-sturdy wheels this year and set some performance goals -and then reward yourself with a 2011 Roubaix early next year?
Just a thought... :)

If you're really hepped up on the idea of upgrading, I agree w/ previous posters about contacting Specialized, just to be sure.

I also agree w/ Alaska Mike about heavier riders using 25mm tires.
 
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