Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Never Give Up!
Joined
·
1,241 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,346 Posts
Quick! Ya gotta move this to the "Components, Wrenching" forum before cxwrench gets back! Come on. Come on. $*#@!!! there he is! GO! GO!
 

·
Never Give Up!
Joined
·
1,241 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
tried some Al pulleys...

noisy, took them off.
Good to know...

Quick! Ya gotta move this to the "Components, Wrenching" forum before cxwrench gets back! Come on. Come on. $*#@!!! there he is! GO! GO!
I thought about that after I posted, was sure how to move it
 

·
'brifter' is f'ing stupid
Joined
·
15,564 Posts
I'm here...

Wrong section, yes. Alloy pulleys, noisy, yes. Waste of money, yes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
I put some KCNC red alloy jockey wheels on a brand new $175 XTR rear derailleur fit on a new mtb build. 3 or 4 short rides later, I was hammering up a chunky climb, putting it down pretty hard when I felt a sudden slow down and sound of springing tension. I stopped immediately and looked back at my rear derailleur that was wrapped in my spokes 90° from normal and destroyed. There was some stiff brush on the side of the trail but I'm almost positive I didn't contact it. My lower jockey was a twisted mess. It had no lateral rigidity in the build. I honestly still don't know what caused the mishap but I'm wondering if the jockey twisted and deformed causing the cage to contact the spokes or if it was the other way around. Needless to say, I got no noticeable benefit other than shiny color match to other custom aluminum bits onmy full carbon bike build. I had to buy a new XTR derailleur in order to get back on the trail in short order but I was able to source a new cage and B axle bracket for about $30 and I threw the original jockeys back on so now I have an essentially new spare rear derailleur. I am still suspicious of those jockeys and I doubt I'll ever go there again for no gain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
275 Posts
Looking the hear from anybody who replaced there rear derailleur (plastic/nylon) stock jockey wheels for Aluminum Sealed Bearing Jockey Wheels and is there a difference in performance?

I found these on Amazon and thought they where pretty cool looking for aesthetics effect only but if there any performance benefits that would be great too.

https://www.amazon.com/Stylrtop-Aluminum-Bearing-Derailleur-Pulleys/dp/B01F5P9S66/ref=cm_wl_huc_item
I rode with a similar set for 3 yrs... recently changed them out for delrin ones, and Boy did the drivetrain quiet down! I can say that it was money waisted, but, they looked cool, and did a decent job. But, cant go wrong here... Buy yourself 2-3 sets for the price of 1 aluminum noisy set: J L 11T Ceramic Derailleur Pulley Jockey 6g 2pc for Shimano SRAM Campagnolo | eBay
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,637 Posts
Looking the hear from anybody who replaced there rear derailleur (plastic/nylon) stock jockey wheels for Aluminum Sealed Bearing Jockey Wheels and is there a difference in performance?
To encapsulate what everyone else has said: Al derailleur pulleys have been around for decades, offer zero performance improvement, are noisy, are often expensive, sometimes don't work so well with a given derailleur, and are mostly bling (assuming anybody ever even looks at your derailleur pulleys.) Also, sealed bearings may not be much of an advantage, particularly since most derailleurs require the upper pulley to have some left/right float to make the shifting work well.
 

·
Never Give Up!
Joined
·
1,241 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
To encapsulate what everyone else has said: Al derailleur pulleys have been around for decades, offer zero performance improvement, are noisy, are often expensive, sometimes don't work so well with a given derailleur, and are mostly bling (assuming anybody ever even looks at your derailleur pulleys.) Also, sealed bearings may not be much of an advantage, particularly since most derailleurs require the upper pulley to have some left/right float to make the shifting work well.
Thanks for the input... I didn't know about the float needed to make things shift well. Think I'll just keep things the way they are :thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,560 Posts
like park bench wing on so many Honda Civix yo
LOL. Yeah, I had blue ones on my MTB back in, oh 1995. I didn't notice the noise nor did I notice any change in shifting performance, good or bad. You can get them with a floating upper pulley wheel.

The problem I ran into is that the sealed bearings in one wheel eventually froze up. Since it was sealed there was no way to disassemble it for repair / relube.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,161 Posts
The best have full ceramic, unlubricated, open ball bearings. The ceramic is much harder than any road grit and simply pulverizes any that gets in them. They'll spin freely no matter what as there are no seals and no lubrication to get gummy. The Shimano pulleys with ceramic bushings are pretty good in this regard, but will have more drag than balls.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top