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Jerkhard Sirdribbledick
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Now that I've been riding my fixte for the past week, I'm starting to realize all the subtle differences between fixed riding and freewheel riding.

So, when I come to a stop, if I'm just using my legs to stop me as opposed to the front brake, I slow down, unclip my left foot, and on the final upstroke of my right foot stand up on the pedal and put my left foot down on the ground. Because of this, my right foot ends up behind me, so I have to pick up the rear of my bike by the saddle and move my right foot into starting position.

Am I lame for doing that? Is there a better way?

If you think this is a stupid question, I'm sure I have more coming.
 

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Premium Member
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Don't lift the seat, push down on the bars.

Push down on the bars unweighting the rear wheel then pedal the crank to the position you want.

Either that or learn how to track stand.

IMO folks that circle around at lights/stops instead of track standing or putting a foot down are a danger to themselves and others.
 

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Jerkhard Sirdribbledick
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
MB1 said:
IMO folks that circle around at lights/stops instead of track standing or putting a foot down are a danger to themselves and others.
Agreed. I've never been a circler. I like the idea from you and wooglin about weighting the front of the bike. Seems a little more graceful.

But to be clear, my stopping technique is ok?

I'm working on my trackstanding skillz ... My brain right now is getting used to the differences with fixte at low speed.
 

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Yer' fine.

DrRoebuck said:
If you think this is a stupid question, I'm sure I have more coming.
"Remember Kyle, there are no stupid questions; just stupid people." - Mr.Garison from South Park.

That's just a silly question. If I stop for a red light and if I'm forced out of my track stand; then I put a foot down and sit on the top tube with one foot clipped in. If I'm not in my starting positin (left foot forward) (It's my "chocolate foot" as Hans Rey would put it) then I will unweight the rear wheel and pedal around till my cranks are in starting position.

Things to avoid:
  • Getting off the bike completely, laying it down and doing a couple windmills with your arms or bending over to touch your toes and then walking back to the bike and rotating the cranks by hand into your prefered position before re-mounting.
  • Spastically hopping in place, trials style, while still clipped in, each time rotating the cranks more and more towards your prefered position while your'e in the air.
  • Unclipping both feet, straddling the bike and reaching down and back through your legs to grab the rear wheel to with your hands and rotating it until your cranks are where you want them.
... avoid these things and you should be kool n' the gang.

Arby.
 

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Fini les ecrase-"manets"!
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What about just skidding to a stop with your feet in your preferred starting position?

(I say this having seen it enough to scare me off of riding a fixie, so take my suggestion for what it's worth--nothing much)
 

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Shirtcocker
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I think yr lame if you worry about what's lame. Do whatever works for you.
 

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If you use the brake for the final stop,

DrRoebuck said:
So, when I come to a stop, if I'm just using my legs to stop me as opposed to the front brake, I slow down, unclip my left foot, and on the final upstroke of my right foot stand up on the pedal and put my left foot down on the ground. Because of this, my right foot ends up behind me, . . .
you can stop with the clipped-in foot in front on the downstroke, and then you don't need to adjust crank position at all. That's how I usually do it; even if I've used back-pressure for most of the slowing, at the last moment I lock the brake when the clipped-in foot (left, for me) is up in front.

If you do need to move the crank, MB1 has described the smooth way: lock front brake, push down and forward on bars, and the rear wheel will lift. I've heard that you can do damage to a saddle by repeatedly lifting on the rear of it, since the construction isn't designed for that stress. I've never personally witnessed that.

Trackstands may be the coolest, but they're hard for some people to learn; in fact, some of us (alas) never get very good at them.
 

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Jerkhard Sirdribbledick
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Bocephus Jones II said:
I think yr lame if you worry about what's lame. Do whatever works for you.
Hmmmmmmmm.
 

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I agree with braking and pushing down on the bars to lift the rear wheel, but I like to rotate the pedals backwards instead of forward to get my feet into position. You should also get used to starting with either foot. As for track-standing, I found that wider tires and using the brake a little really helped me get the hang of it.
 

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Jerkhard Sirdribbledick
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
fixintogo said:
I agree with braking and pushing down on the bars to lift the rear wheel, but I like to rotate the pedals backwards instead of forward to get my feet into position. You should also get used to starting with either foot. As for track-standing, I found that wider tires and using the brake a little really helped me get the hang of it.
I usually move the pedals backwards as well. Easier for me to position the pedal where I like it.

I don't think I've ever clipped out of the right foot instead of the left my entire life!
 
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