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Discussion Starter #1
Subjective question I know.

Just had a great discussion with a shop owner and he was telling me all about newer bikes. Slacker angles and wider tires that run on lower pressures.

I’m still riding a 1986 steel guercotti that has 25mm tires and wide handlebars. Full 9spd STI setup.

Tried googling newer road geometry but kinda came up empty.

Opinions welcomed.


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shops need to move inventory to stay in business...of course the guy is gonna try and sell you on a new 'wonder bike'...

if your current ride still pleases you, stay with it.

I ride a late 90s titanium Serotta with DA 7800, it's a great bike...have no interest in some carbon POS with fat tires.
 

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Angles schmangles, wider tires, lower pressures, gravel bikes, disc brakes; it's all marketing, making your current bike obsolete a year after you own it.

Your Guerciotti, as long as it fits, is fine. The trend to tires much wider than 25mm is for riding on gravel and dirt roads, which is a trend in itself.
 

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I agree with the posts above, but I would give a different answer if we were discussing mountain bikes, even updating an MTB from 2005.
 

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Yea... this should be obvious and simple.
;)

...unless the OP is oddly-sized, like me. My road frames are 62-64 ctc, and it's rare when I can go into a shop and they'll have a CF wonderbike for me to test. Classic First-World problem?

Odds are, of course, that the OP doesn't have this problem, so go for the test ride; what can it hurt?
 

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I have to agree that if you are still enjoying your old bike and it still motivates you to go out and ride, then why "upgrade"?

But I detect a curiosity that now won't leave you alone. As others have said, go out and test ride some bikes. See what you think. You may be pleasantly surprised..................or not.

As far as finding info on road geometry, you will have better luck going to one of the many bike brand websites - Cannondale, Trek, Specialized, Giant, etc. What brands does your shop sell?

I have my own opinions on which newer features fall into the categories of really good, nice to have but not really necessary and wouldn't touch with a ten foot pole. Others opinions will differ.
 

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My Trek Domane is hugely different than my steel Lemond. Higher stack makes for a more comfortable position, 32mm tires are cushy with plenty of grip, and Isospeed elastomer frame inserts leave me fresher after a long ride. And it’s 2 lbs lighter.

The Lemond is still serving me faithfully on the indoor trainer.

Try Geometry Geeks for comparing bikes.
 

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Try and get your hands on a copy of "The All-Road Bike Revolution" by Jan Heine, it answers a lot of the hows and whys about these bikes, and then test ride. There is much about frame geometry and how and why the differences affect the ride of the bike.

Easy to read with much information, in one place, to help understand what the bikes are bringing to the table.
 

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Subjective question I know.

Just had a great discussion with a shop owner and he was telling me all about newer bikes. Slacker angles and wider tires that run on lower pressures.

I’m still riding a 1986 steel guercotti that has 25mm tires and wide handlebars. Full 9spd STI setup.

Tried googling newer road geometry but kinda came up empty.

Opinions welcomed.
It's unlikely that your current bike is really holding you back, but that doesn't mean a new one wouldn't add some joy to your ride. You may well be able to put wider tires on the bike and that would improve the ride comfort without slowing you down (assuming you choose the right tires). I second the recommendation to read Jan Hein's book.
 

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Like others have said, your current bike is probably fine all things considered, but newer bikes have some nice features to offer as well. It often comes down to an economical decision for me. I would think hard about what you want to spend your money on right now. That thought process has led me to a decision to try to avoid overlapping with bike types, meaning I try to get something that is significantly different from what I already have if I am going to make a purchase. So, if you currently have a pure road bike you are happy with, why not try some gravel, mountain, cyclocross, all road, or track bikes and see if one of those appeal to you? Maybe revisit getting another pure road bike when you are over your current one or when it's just too hard to get replacement parts for or functioning poorly, etc. You can only ride one at a time anyway, so I say get something that allows you to have some different experiences or that makes it easier for you to ride in new places if you feel like you already have one segment covered.
 

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I agree with test riding a new aluminum or carbon frame bike. I test rode a carbon bike with carbon wheels a few years ago and was massively impressed. This compared to an aluminum frame and aluminum box rims. Mind you I could not afford it but I do plan on carbon wheels and shifting group upgrade soon.
 

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I agree with test riding a new aluminum or carbon frame bike. I test rode a carbon bike with carbon wheels a few years ago and was massively impressed. This compared to an aluminum frame and aluminum box rims. Mind you I could not afford it but I do plan on carbon wheels and shifting group upgrade soon.
Comparing aluminum box rims to carbon wheels isn't really a fair comparison. There are many good lightweight aluminum wheels now that are just as light as carbon wheels, but less expensive. And no, I do not recommend any Chinese knock-off brand carbon wheels unless you like problems.
 
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shops need to move inventory to stay in business...of course the guy is gonna try and sell you on a new 'wonder bike'...

if your current ride still pleases you, stay with it.

I ride a late 90s titanium Serotta with DA 7800, it's a great bike...have no interest in some carbon POS with fat tires.
You said really well. I agree with you.
 

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Subjective question I know.

Just had a great discussion with a shop owner and he was telling me all about newer bikes. Slacker angles and wider tires that run on lower pressures.

I’m still riding a 1986 steel guercotti that has 25mm tires and wide handlebars. Full 9spd STI setup.

Tried googling newer road geometry but kinda came up empty.

Opinions welcomed.


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It is apparent to me you have a very rideable bike currently, one that is not a cookie cutter CF bike, keep riding the heck out of your Guercotti.
I can’t answer your question about whether or not are you missing something but I can guarantee you won’t be missing perhaps a few G from your bank account.
Over the years I went from steel to CF and back again and don’t regret returning to the roots.
 

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Nevermind 'new', you may benefit from a 'different' bike or you may not.

I certainly liked going from a very quick handling bike that barely fit 25mm tires to a somewhat slower handling bike that I could fit 28mm tires on.

But that was going from a modern carbon bike to a Titanium bike so 'new' in terms of technology had nothing to do with it.
Your current bike may be just what you want. May not be. We have no way of knowing.
 

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It is apparent to me you have a very rideable bike currently, one that is not a cookie cutter CF bike, keep riding the heck out of your Guercotti.
I can’t answer your question about whether or not are you missing something but I can guarantee you won’t be missing perhaps a few G from your bank account.
Over the years I went from steel to CF and back again and don’t regret returning to the roots.
Gotta agree with this, ride one to see, but I've had some bikes in the past that I regret selling, never have found the same fit/comfort on newer designs. I'd probably upgrade some components as they wear out, I'm still enjoying 9-speed drivetrain and certainly not going to 11. Good tires that arent' too heavy, maybe some nice aluminum rims, don't need carbon imo. :)
 
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