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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So this idea of another bike has kinda crept in my head.

A retro bike (probably all steel) something found at a garage sale or craigslist. The frame and fork to cost no more than 100 dollars, or free if found on the highway. Maybe classic bullhorn bars

Maybe a raliegh or panasonic frame.

But everything else updated, to a campy groupset. Record or chorus level or if i can find a deal on super record. 53/39 crankset

Wheels light weight mavic endurance wrapped with a 25 or 28 width tire.

The idea of the bike is to be as much art but able to ridden on a casual setting.
 

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So this idea of another bike has kinda crept in my head.

A retro bike (probably all steel) something found at a garage sale or craigslist. The frame and fork to cost no more than 100 dollars, or free if found on the highway. Maybe classic bullhorn bars

Maybe a raliegh or panasonic frame.

But everything else updated, to a campy groupset. Record or chorus level or if i can find a deal on super record. 53/39 crankset

Wheels light weight mavic endurance wrapped with a 25 or 28 width tire.

The idea of the bike is to be as much art but able to ridden on a casual setting.
Finding a quality, classic steel bike for $100 is going to require some significant luck. Not sure it make sense (to me a least) to drop a couple of grand on Record components and wheels on a dumpster diver frame
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Finding a quality, classic steel bike for $100 is going to require some significant luck. Not sure it make sense (to me a least) to drop a couple of grand on Record components and wheels on a dumpster diver frame
Well the frame will be restored, there is a metal work place near by office. Then repainted or chromed.
 

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Well the frame will be restored, there is a metal work place near by office. Then repainted or chromed.
well first of all the whole retro-modern idea has been widely done. plenty of folks doing that. And that's cause it is a cool idea!

and this idea of a cheap frame you properly restore .. is as costly as finding a good frame in the first place. I was set to throw out my old italian Battaglin a couple years ago, I've owned since new. It was in utterly horrible shape. But I fixed it up, removed the stuck seat post, and had to properly repainted. Nothing fancy, but the bill was like $550 for the paint job (plus two trips to Vancouver!). By the time I got the frame restored, I could have just bought a good condition old Colnago frame off ebay for $700 or so. (I built it up with period parts though, not modern)
 

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I agree with Dave. There's too big a mismatch between the quality of frame you're talking about and the component level. Doesn't make sense.

Not that I'm opposed to re-purposing such a frame. My favorite fixed-gear bike is built on a Rampar frame from the 70's. That was a Taiwan-made Raleigh America product, that Raleigh in England wouldn't let them put the Raleigh name on (except on a tiny sticker). I love the bike; it rides great. But I fixed it up with a mix of old and new parts, nothing approaching the Record level. It wouldn't have made sense to put even $500 in parts on a $5 frame.

As for your metal-restoration response, the point is that the cheap frames you're likely to find are made of inexpensive tubing. No amount of restoring and painting can change that.

You could get your fun and function with lower level parts just as well as fancy Record stuff. There are some issues, however. Rear frame spacing may be wrong (though you can fix that with steel), and you have to watch out for 27" wheels. The modern wheels you're looking at are 700c. You could put them on a 27" frame, but you'd probably need to use longer-reach brakes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
well first of all the whole retro-modern idea has been widely done. plenty of folks doing that. And that's cause it is a cool idea!

and this idea of a cheap frame you properly restore .. is as costly as finding a good frame in the first place. I was set to throw out my old italian Battaglin a couple years ago, I've owned since new. It was in utterly horrible shape. But I fixed it up, removed the stuck seat post, and had to properly repainted. Nothing fancy, but the bill was like $550 for the paint job (plus two trips to Vancouver!). By the time I got the frame restored, I could have just bought a good condition old Colnago frame off ebay for $700 or so. (I built it up with period parts though, not modern)
I just want to make a nice piece of ride-able art, that if i wanted to do a casual trail ride it would turn some heads. Price, it is more or less buy it in parts. It wont be all lump sum.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I agree with Dave. There's too big a mismatch between the quality of frame you're talking about and the component level. Doesn't make sense.

Not that I'm opposed to re-purposing such a frame. My favorite fixed-gear bike is built on a Rampar frame from the 70's. That was a Taiwan-made Raleigh America product, that Raleigh in England wouldn't let them put the Raleigh name on (except on a tiny sticker). I love the bike; it rides great. But I fixed it up with a mix of old and new parts, nothing approaching the Record level. It wouldn't have made sense to put even $500 in parts on a $5 frame.

As for your metal-restoration response, the point is that the cheap frames you're likely to find are made of inexpensive tubing. No amount of restoring and painting can change that.

You could get your fun and function with lower level parts just as well as fancy Record stuff. There are some issues, however. Rear frame spacing may be wrong (though you can fix that with steel), and you have to watch out for 27" wheels. The modern wheels you're looking at are 700c. You could put them on a 27" frame, but you'd probably need to use longer-reach brakes.
I know there are a lot of details to work out. But this will be a summer project. I like my bikes i have now, but i was looking at retro bikes over the weekend, ad they kind of sparked an interest in me.
 

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You can get a classic looking steel frame new and save yourself the trouble of restoring one. Probably less money too.
 

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I've got it. It's very retro, it's fun, and it will surely turn heads on the bike path. And you can do some cool cosplay in knickers and argyle socks with a tweed jacket.
Bicycle tire Bicycle wheel rim Bicycle wheel Spoke Shoe

Seriously, though, if you want to have a fun summer project that gets you a bike with a really different riding experience from your modern bikes, find that old frame and do a fixie conversion. You might hate it (but won't have spent much, and could probably recover most of that by selling it), but you might love it. It's genuinely different.
 

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It's a fun process, and you'll probably end up with a cool and somewhat unique bike. Mixing in new parts with old is a good idea because you want it to be worth riding and maintainable.

However, I would caution you on one thing: You may end up spending a lot of time and money on a bike you end up never riding. I had a decent extra steel MTB frame that I built up as a singlespeed conversion. It was supposed to be my leisure / errands ride. It's a gorgeous bike and I absolutely love it-- but I NEVER get around to riding it.
 

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I am towards the end of my fixing up a vintage Italian frame project. I have had a lot of help from some great people. Some of this help has been free or next to it and even some barter. I have way more money in it then I planned
 

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I have way more money in it then I planned
my retro-mod is about 400% over my initial cost estimate. all the used parts that were installed initially got replaced with nicer stuff...

oh well, have had fun building and riding it, so not a problem.
 

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Classic bulhorn bars with Campy record? You definitely lost me there.

I'd find and old beater frame decked out with Campy Record to be tacky about the same way I find 1990's Honda civics decked out with some NASCAR level car parts to be tacky. But who care what I think.
 

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I'll do a new round of my pics of my neo-retro Seven tomorrow maybe.

Pulling the look off while being functional for your riding purposes is a tricky balance, especially if you are trying to do it on a cheapo frameset. Also many vintage or classic steel frames will simply barely or not at all fit 25/25mm tires under the brake calipers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I'll do a new round of my pics of my neo-retro Seven tomorrow maybe.

Pulling the look off while being functional for your riding purposes is a tricky balance, especially if you are trying to do it on a cheapo frameset. Also many vintage or classic steel frames will simply barely or not at all fit 25/25mm tires under the brake calipers.
I know it will be tricky, but it is going to be an adventure.

The reason i want a frame that doens't look rich, is i want the drivetrain and wheels to pop. I just like the look of campy components.
 

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I've done this... sort of. 1997 Klein frameset + new components and wheels. I get way more comments on that bike than my black carbon framed, Ultegra shod road bike.
 

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Classic bulhorn bars with Campy record? You definitely lost me there.

I'd find and old beater frame decked out with Campy Record to be tacky about the same way I find 1990's Honda civics decked out with some NASCAR level car parts to be tacky. But who care what I think.
Jay, you say that but you toss a bolt-on spoiler and a REALLY big muffler on that Civic and you got yourself a real crowd-pleaser
 
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