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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The frame came to me via an Internet friend, and it is in rather good cosmetic shape. Just the usual scrapes in an amount that will make it less stressful to take the finished bike on the road.

It is made with Reynolds 753, a grade of steel I've yet to ride (although my unmarked 92 Gazelle is purportedly of same material, according to the seller Mr. Stone of the UK).

The Look is a 62cm cc, with a 59cm top tube and 42cm chain stays. The wheel base will likely end up being a relaxed 102.5cm. 126mm rear spacing, English threads throughout, and the usual 27.2mm seat tube ID.

The year is probably mid eighties. Did Look build this frame or, as have been suggested on the Web, some unconfirmed frame maker got the contract? Who knows?

Anyway, enough chatter:




I started out scrubbing the frame and fork with Simple Green. After drying I removed many shallow blemishes with Turtle white polishing compound and wax .


The English threaded BB shell was in good shape, with the taps just needed for general cleaning of old framesaver and cheese like grease deposits.


Then I cut the faces to remove a few little dings and again mostly just to clean things up.


The fork got the same treatment. Here the crown race under the knife..


..and the threads
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
BTW, weighed the frame/fork and it comes in at 2750 grams.

Continued messing with my luscious Campy tools for more frame prep, and then as the build started for real with the headset cups I switched to the $12 home made all-thread press. And guess what? It worked just fine. But crudely, and without the irresistible need to fondle & caress.


This guy faces the headtube lugs and cuts a small chamfer on the inside. The latter helps the cups get started when pressing them in.


Stuck the fork alignment tools on the rear. The drops measured a few mm wider than 126 (just fine, considering the current plans), but also slightly skewed. The 753 stuff yielded only very reluctantly to my efforts. I got it close, but not perfect.
These things also work on the front fork and different spacings.


A length of 5/8" all-thread, nuts, big washers and 2 rubber discs make up a simple tool to gently press the headset cups in.
Velo Orange $20 el cheapo. I like this one. Pretty, no frills, durable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·

I've found that when installing the sealed BB unit, with its delicate splined alloy cups, it's safer with something keeping the tool firmly in place to prevent slipping. An old skewer has worked for me.


The little spring steel clamp keeps the wrenches from slipping and rounding the corners of the nut.

My idea for this project have gone around a bit. It will be a bi-weekly rider, but to avoid redundancy (yes, a concept unknown to many here!) I was wanting something different that the other regulars. The original plan was to make it my dedicated climbing bike, since in these parts the hills are steep and upwards of 4000 vertical, and I love to ride there. While my current line-up scale these obstacles with some degree of success, the gearing in particular could be improved upon.



But now that I see the frame with wheels in place I realize that it may not go any faster or otherwise be better suited to hill climbing compared to my existing rides. First off the wheels base is 102.5 cm, hardly aggressive by today's standards, or even back in 1986. It is also a cm or two taller than I first thought.

So the new idea is the 'Century Rider'. The size will afford a relatively comfortable position (albeit not as laxed as the two 65cm frames in the stable), and the modernistic drive train/group I have in mind should give trouble free index shifting.


It's time to tinker with the components, a mix of 10 speed Chorus and Record from before the little carbon tidbits crept in.




Record hubs with Mavic Open Pro 32H and DT butted spokes. A quality wheelset with a traditional feel, and certainly strong. Remember Cav's front rim in Tour de Suisse? Will be a while before I go carbon...
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Worked on the chainline. As it turned out just mounting the crank and checking the measurements was all that was required.


From a point halfway between the rings to the center line of the frame is about 43mm.


The rear spacing is 130mm (with the hub spreading the original 126'ish mm). So from the center line of the hub to the inside face of the drop is 130 divided by 2 = 65mm. From the same hub center line to the idealized chainline we measured 43mm at the crank.
65 minus 43 = 22mm, which should be the distance from the inside face of the right drop to the middle of the cluster.


Now all I need is to go find a 10 speed chain.... anybody know if I can keep using my old chain breaker on these narrow ones?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The front derailleur I got a hold off for a little more the change in my pocket has a 35mm clamp. Mighty big. Must be for one of those alloy frames.

I figured it would be all right if I came up with some spacer material. A few minutes in the hardware store brought me to the plumbing aisle. A PVC sleeve for connecting 3/4" pipe seemed about right in size.



After sawing off a narrow section and splitting the resulting ring in two I went ahead and lined the derailleur clamp with the pieces.



It looks a little awkward, but it works. I thought the FD might move out too far for the inside limit, but it'll be fine.

 

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Love this thread. That frame's in great shape. I'm suffering serious Campy toolset envy. Fortunately my favorite LBS has one & I'm allowed to "borrow" the set & work on my bike in the work area when needed.
 

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Jan, I really enjoyed this thread, if only for the amazing set of acquired Campag tools, in addition to the excellent informative shots.

In addition, I also loved the Saturday romp through all your other sites including the climbing option as well as the "Off the Grid" sample, amazing in and of itself. I had seen that site when you first posted it and was interested to find your next project well on its way.

You have one lucky child that gets to learn and experience many things most Americans would never see, and hands-on no less, a far cry from the video game remote learning culture so prevalent these days.

Look forward to following your future experiences, both two-wheel and beyond.

- kh
 

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Just curious, but who was the actual builder of these frames? Since Look was more of a pedal and ski binding manufacturer, I'm wondering who actually put torch to tubes and built these frames under their label? Did Look contract out their manufacture? Or, did Look actually have their own frame shop?

Thanks,

Robert
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
aptivaboy said:
Just curious, but who was the actual builder of these frames? Or, did Look actually have their own frame shop?
Robert, I have not been able to come up with any definitive answer. Some obscure Internet source alluded to an Italian frame builder, but since it's English threaded I didn't put much weight to that.

Anybody out there know who built this limited production frame set in the mid eighties?
 
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