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"Finally, when used in place of road tires there is a 15% increase in drag which is great for training but not for race day."

"Ever Tire sounds like the cat’s meow, but it has one drawback — each tire needs a specialized rim to accommodate the airless design."

"Nexo is aware of this problem and has created the Nexo Tire, another type of airless tire that is designed to fit on your existing rims. Nexo Tires achieve this compatibility using patented T-bolts that fit under the lip of a standard rubber tire rim. These bolts extend down into the airless tire to hold it into place. Installation is not as easy as the Ever Tires which just require you to swap out the rims"
 

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So, three bike shop owners who readily admitted their biggest source of traffic is flat tires want people to adopt a proprietary tire system that could eliminate their biggest source of traffic? The Force is not strong with these ones.

Unfortunately, those tires will only work well on dry roads. When it rains they will collect standing water through the sidewalls, and on dirt paths they will collect mud and small gravel. Basically, the time and hassle saved not having to fix a flat will be replaced by the time and hassle of cleaning out these Swiss cheese tires.
 

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I already thought this was a bad idea, but when I realized it was also a Kickstarter campaign, it seems twice as bad.
Here's the fundamental challenge: those willing to pay "more" for flat free riding and who are not interested in rolling performance are a very small niche. The vast majority of bikes sold are low quality and the manufacturers are VERY cost sensitive. Putting on a new wheel/tire system will inevitably raise costs and they have very little ability to pass those costs on because their customers are not at all discerning about performance features.

Despite well over 100 years of trying no one has come close to finding a design or material that will roll well, offer good traction, and be flat proof. Not even close. So the performance customer (us) will not buy it. The cost focused customer will not buy it, and even many commuters who want the flat free performance will not buy it after they experience the ride quality.

An advantage/disadvantage (perspective, baby!) of having been into cycling for 55 years is that you get to see a lot of things come around again and again. And then you find out that these things have been coming around again and again long before you got involved. It makes one cynical, or at least doubtful. I'm doubtful.
 

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I will never buy anything on Kickstarter again after the taggio pro pump head that never worked and wasted my money on it.
 

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To the thread title: Yup.

Except maybe on a kid's bike, replacing a tire that never gets pumped up so it's almost riding on the rim.
 

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i have no problem with kickstarter. and, actually, i think it's great for the little guy trying to get his product out there. hopefully, it's a good product. if not, it may quickly fail.

i do have a problem with people too lazy or disinterested in learning how to take five minutes to repair a tube puncture with a $2 kit.
 

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An advantage/disadvantage (perspective, baby!) of having been into cycling for 55 years is that you get to see a lot of things come around again and again. And then you find out that these things have been coming around again and again long before you got involved. It makes one cynical, or at least doubtful. I'm doubtful.
Your experience and doubt might blind you to truly new and great ideas. This thread sparked a great idea! I think this is revolutionary, and never been thought of before, because it is about a need that is new given changing riding habits.

We all know one important limitation on which bike to buy is tire size, usually width. Wider tires are gaining favor. The widest tires that fit cause an issue; it can be hard to get wheels off with conventional brakes, unless you release the brakes to widen them. And that risks forgetting to tighten them back down when putting the wheel back on. This can result in SERIOUS INJURY or even DEATH!!!!

My new idea will solve that CRITICAL SAFETY problem, while making it easy to get wheels on and off without having to deflate the tire. I have designed a brake that attaches to the stem, not the fork. Braking forces are applied downwards, not sideways. To distinguish my new, revolutionary design from the brakes that go on forks, or "fork brakes", I call my new design a "spoon brake", which is clearly a great marketing term, right?

I only need $200,000 to get a prototype to market. Who's in?
 

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I call my new design a "spoon brake", which is clearly a great marketing term, right?

I only need $200,000 to get a prototype to market. Who's in?
Terrific idea. And the way is probably clear, since the patents from the 1880's have probably expired by now.
 
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