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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Browsed through the 2004, 2010, and 2013 threads regarding grease vs Loctite on chainring bolts, but starting new thread to see if opinions have changed...

Swapping some chainrings and planning to use Park anti-seize compound on the chainring bolts. I use it on threaded bottom bracket and pedal parts usually.

Yay or nay?
 

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IMO Loctite Blue 243 is what I use for this application, if you coat the entire thread contact it will provide corrosion protection as well as its primary function. It is not antiseize but at the same time it provides more than enough protection for this application.

Bottom bracket (other than the one side of french threaded) and pedals I use anti-seize.
 

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I don't use anti-seize anywhere on a bike. Grease on pedal spindles and BB threads and blue Locktight or nothing everywhere else. For the chain ring bolts, blue Locktite.
 

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It's not going to matter. Has anyone had either fail?
I haven't myself, but a friend DNF'd DK200 because his chainring bolts got loose and let the small ring get mangled 2 years ago and another friend had the same failure on a new crank a local shop installed - so yep, it can happen. One could argue they weren't torqued correctly I suppose, but we will never know that answer to that question with certainty.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hmm, given there aren't different types of metal in play, now leaning towards grease.
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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I also hate anti-seize. Grease on pretty much everything. The only exceptions are suspension pivots on some bikes...but even then I've greased them and had no issues. If it has threads, grease it. If it might move and make noise, grease it. If it's carbon, use carbon paste.
 

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Matnlely Dregaend
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I have corrosive sweat. I avoid aluminum parts on my bike because my sweat eats it for breakfast. I use antiseize. Tried Campag grease and even marine grease. I've had the bolts corrode in place so bad they sparked when disassembling.
 

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I have corrosive sweat. I avoid aluminum parts on my bike because my sweat eats it for breakfast. I use antiseize. Tried Campag grease and even marine grease. I've had the bolts corrode in place so bad they sparked when disassembling.
I agree, although I don't sweat nearly as much as I did 20+ years ago. Anti-seize never dries out. Granted, if you regularly maintain your bike, grease should suffice in most environments. But when using anti-seize, you have to treat that stuff like it's the plague, because if you get a single speck somewhere unintended, it'll spread like COVID-19.

I also use anti-seize on brake hardware on cars. Dealing with high temps makes it much better for that application.
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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You're not washing your bike well enough/often enough. I'm talking every ride.
 

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I also hate anti-seize. Grease on pretty much everything. The only exceptions are suspension pivots on some bikes...but even then I've greased them and had no issues. If it has threads, grease it. If it might move and make noise, grease it. If it's carbon, use carbon paste.
Anti seize is so messy I avoid it. Regular bike maintenance with grease has not failed me over the past 50+ years of riding. But if you want to lube something and then "never" maintain it, anti seize is the way to go.

And for people who have had chain ring bolts come loose, that is a problem with the mechanic, not with whether they use LocTite or not.
 

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I think anti seize lasts longer than grease, but if you're worrying about a bolt coming loose it doesn't matter if you tighten it correctly. The reason I've used it on pedals and seat posts is to keep them from stuck (seized). The stuff is a mess and tends to get on everything which is why I use grease most of the time
 

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I haven't myself, but a friend DNF'd DK200 because his chainring bolts got loose and let the small ring get mangled 2 years ago and another friend had the same failure on a new crank a local shop installed - so yep, it can happen. One could argue they weren't torqued correctly I suppose, but we will never know that answer to that question with certainty.

So which one, anti seize or grease, are you implying might have failed?
 

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So which one, anti seize or grease, are you implying might have failed?
They didn't locktite the bolts is all I know, could have been dry or lubed. One was a new crank with rings installed by a shop, the other one I don't have much background on other than it didn't have loctite (that was the DK200 DNF) because I talked with him a the 2nd rest stop about the failure and probability of finishing. I use loctite on chain ring bolts, rotor bolts (when I didn't have centerlock) and bottle cages (just my gravel bikes) and saddle mounted bottle carriers. Those are all either areas I consider critical and/or high probability of losening, or I have had problems with them loosening (some would call those criminal fasteners). Granted, the rotors and chain ring bolts shouldn't losen if torqued correctly but I have heard of too many problems with both to risk it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
On the rings I just changed, the bolts were so hard to get apart I wonder if the previous owner used epoxy glue or something. Luckily still able to re-use, though. Went with grease this time.
 

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I used Loctite on chainring bolts once and they made them very difficult to remove because the insert that goes into the chainring would spin. Properly tightened, chainring bolts shouldn't come loose.
 

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On the rings I just changed, the bolts were so hard to get apart I wonder if the previous owner used epoxy glue or something. Luckily still able to re-use, though. Went with grease this time.
That's precisely why you want to use grease or anti-seize.
 

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That's precisely why you want to use grease or anti-seize.
He probably used lockite. IMO, the only reason to use anti-sieze is where you have dissimilar metals or soft metals (non-alloy aluminum) and/or where there is road salt/chemicals that would make the interface between the metals react with each other. ... or where the directions say anti-seize.
 
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