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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Skidded out on black ice two days ago. Still recovering but its got me thinking about getting studded tires. i read up on the pros and cons but wondered if anyone has ridden centuries on them. Will the added rolling resistance make this a drag or largely impractical? Already dealing with doing long rides in winter boots which has been putting added strain on my calf muscles and a heavier winter bike.
 

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What width tires does your bike allow? I'm not sure there are any production studded tires under 32mm available. The Nokina A10 is the skinniest I know of, there are numerous options in 35mm and even more the wider you go like for mtb's.

Peter White Cycles has one of the best pages I've seen for looking into studded tires and being able to order them. It's limited to the nicer tires. The only one I can think of that's decent that's not there is the kenda klondike.

Studded Bicycle Tires

My opinion of studded tires is kind of like my approach to racing off-road, if you're crashing and sliding to the point of being uncontrolled you're not really going to be any faster than just running the slower, grippier tire.

Since I live in Michigan I pretty much roll studs from November to March and I pretty much only roll single speed during winter now since replacing the parts is a lot easier. I don't ride outside in the winter nearly as much as I used to on account of living somewhere else where traffic is far worse and drivers are much more aggressive and because higher intensity workouts are very hard for me when it's really cold and/or slippery. I mostly try to ride outside for longer endurance rides in the winter and then do sufferfest indoors.
 

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What kind of frameset are we talking about?

As Mssr. bikerector points out....studded tired don't come in narrow widths. Odds are low anything the modern market calls a "road bike" will be able to clear them. Either the brake calipers won't clear, or the brake bridges won't clear. For studded tires you are either talking a bespoke road bike, or mainline CX/MTB bikes although hybrids might work if they have canti or disc brakes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Never mind. this is going in the wrong direction. I posted the same question elsewhere and got the response i was looking for. a Century rides on road bike outfitted with studded wheels would not be a good idea.
 

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Studded tires are very dicey on anything but snow and ice. Think contact patch and how the studs change this.
 

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I wouldn't have a problem riding a century on studded tires and I personally don't find them dicey at all on pavement. They're not race tires so don't rail corners and don't over-inflate them as that won't allow the studs to sink into the rubber properly so you'll lose traction and studs.

I think I've ridden as far as 60-70 miles on studs without any problems other than being pretty cold by the end. Just know that the tires are heavier and not optimized for fast rolling and plan your times accordingly.
 

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I wouldn't have a problem riding a century on studded tires and I personally don't find them dicey at all on pavement.
+1. Unless you're using some wonky home-made tires, I can't think of a scenario where the studs would have any affect on the contact patch. They just get pressed up into the rubber.

I've been using the same set of 1.9" Nokian Mount and Grounds (maybe they're closer to 1.75") on my commuter for, my gosh, 12 winters.

My commute is only about 9 miles round trip but I've never had a problem with them on mixed ice/pavement. I do notice the weight the first few times out but then when I take them off in the spring my bike feels like a rocket ship.

Any weather that required studs would deter me from a century (it is ski season after all) but I wouldn't let the actual use of studded tires be the deciding factor as long as you realize that they will slow you down a bit.
 

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Been running Nokian W106s on my drop-bar mtb for close to 2 decades, and every year consider snagging a pair in 700c for the touring bike. So far I've resisted, but mostly because I'm not sure it would make enough of a difference for me to spend the money.

I'm more than happy to trade the weight, rolling resistance, and noise of studded tires for the ability to stay vertical.

And yeah, what dir-t said about switching to real tires in the spring!
 

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I use studded tires and they are slower but they do keep you upright and much safer than without. I commute all year long and would not consider not using them, my bones are more valuable than speed! :) A shot of me using studded tires no problem!
Atmospheric phenomenon Atmosphere Road surface Haze Mist
 

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I have a pair of suomi tires on mt MTB, the road bike is laid up for the winter. I don't have a fixie so I don't ride in the snow. There are lots of days here with clear roads with patches of ice. I just rode 34 miles yesterday, it took 20 minutes longer than the same course than with the same bike with smooth tires. Most of my ride yesterday was on dry roads and the tires gripped fine. They don't have an aggressive tread pattern, smaller lugs than on most MTB tires. There' more like road tires in that respect, but on ice, they have 160 carbide studs per tire they, are as stable as regular tires on dry roads. I wouldn't ride during the winter without them.
Keep your hands, face and feet warm!

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Has anyone found that studded tires damage the floor, carpet, mats, etc? Also, assuming adequate clearance, do you run them with fenders?
 

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Has anyone found that studded tires damage the floor, carpet, mats, etc? Also, assuming adequate clearance, do you run them with fenders?
I keep my bikes in the garage but I could easily imagine some scenarios where they could mess up indoor surfaces. But, as long as you're not riding the bike inside or dragging it across the floor while applying the brakes, I think you would be fine. I would carry it across any hard wood floors though.

I run mine with fenders. No problems at all.
 

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Has anyone found that studded tires damage the floor, carpet, mats, etc? Also, assuming adequate clearance, do you run them with fenders?
I wouldn't roll the studded tire on wood floors but they haven't scratched the tile floor in the mud room. I don't remember them tearing up the linoleum in my apt but I usually had a towel down where the bike was stationed to catch the dripping so it didn't see much linoleum, just enough to get past the entryway.

I use them with fenders and haven't had problems but I give a lot of clearance to relieve snow and ice build up. If you ride on wet roads below freezing temps (right around the 30 degree range) it's possible to get a big icy mess but I've only had that happen once. My entire bike was coated in ice that day including the cables and cable stops. I don't think I had good, full-coverage fenders on that bike as it was a bikedirect CX bike without a lot of braze-ons.
 

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Thanks for the responses. I live in an apartment building and my employer no longer owns this building and I'm afraid my bike could become persona non grata in one or both places. I have Pergo in the apartment.

Also, I wasn't aware of the icing problem. Those temps are typical in northern NJ during the AM and PM commutes.
 

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Also, I wasn't aware of the icing problem. Those temps are typical in northern NJ during the AM and PM commutes.
Yeah, I've had the same problem. In my case, water splashes up from the front tire, even with a full coverage fender, and sticks to the cassette. By the time I get to work only my lowest gear is usable while the other 7 skip as the chain can no longer engage with the sprocket teeth. If it happened more often I would probably convert the bike to a single speed but "luckily" it's usually much colder than that here when there is snow on the ground.
 

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Frozen brake calipers always adds a little excitement to the commute.
That's probably not a concern for people who take their bike out in the morning and bring it in once at work. Used to happen to me quite often when locking my bike on the street 24/7 though. Frozen locks is another joy of winter commuting. Can't say I miss standing in windy sub 0 weather taking a cigarette lighter to the lock and brakes just to get going. I'm done with that.
 

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Yeah, I've had the same problem. In my case, water splashes up from the front tire, even with a full coverage fender, and sticks to the cassette. By the time I get to work only my lowest gear is usable while the other 7 skip as the chain can no longer engage with the sprocket teeth. If it happened more often I would probably convert the bike to a single speed but "luckily" it's usually much colder than that here when there is snow on the ground.
That sounds about like my experience. It's not common as if it's below freezing it's usually dry and if it's above freezing it's not a problem. Studded tires open up the possibility of riding in freezing rain or those rare occasions it rains and then the temps keep dropping to under freezing around late fall and early spring.

I actually switched to a single speed CX bike though it's more because of the road salt eating up the drivetrain than anything else. The SS also helps force me to ride slower in the winter. I live in flat land so there's not much climbing for me but it does stink when there's a stiff head wind and some heavy snow.

I really like winter riding as it adds a sense of adventure and it helps alleviate the "cooped up" feeling I get sometimes from it being dark and cold all the time which keeps me indoors more often. Be sure to get some good lights to go with the winter setup.
 

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If your already using a normal all weather treaded tire then studded tires would be a good thing to at least try out. Decide for yourself if they provide you with what you need.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
From what i'm now hearing. Studs very effective on black ice. if riding sections without ice then noisy wheels, longer braking, poor cornering and overall harsh ride. Doesn't sound like a fun 100 miles in the least.

Perhaps better not to ride in those situations.
 
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