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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was diagnosed with reactive hypoglycemia about 10 years ago, and have a family history of diabetes. I have always been a fairly active person, never been over weight and eat very well.

About 5 years ago I decided I wanted to do centuries, and I was able to do two that summer with out, really, any issues with my blood sugar. I would even say that I felt better than before I started cycling that much.

Fast forward to this past summer, I decided to try another century or two, but I have been unable to really accomplish much of anything because my blood sugar crashes before I can really get any sort of distance in. While it is fairly hilly it isn't that bad and I am only able to get in about 10-12 miles before I start having problems.

Then I made a new friend through a summer job and she was into crossfit. I started doing that about 3 months ago. It was good for about 1 month then I started having problems the same as with the bike but more intense. I go 4 times a week and for the past 2 months have been able to complete maybe 6-8 of the workouts. I am very frustrated and am almost to the point that I don't want to do it anymore because it is extremely frustrating and just isn't fun, but I don't want to give in to this. I really like biking and just being active in general I feel so much better when I am active.

I eat small meals every 3-4 hours I even wake up at 2:30 am to eat so that when I get up to go to the gym I will be more stable. While it helps it doesn't fix the problem. Now crossfit is very big on promoting the Paleo diet, and while I have started eating more veggies and fruits I had no intention of going "Paleo". The thing is though, as I have been eating more veggies and fewer carbs (specifically grains) I have become more sensitive to eating carbs. Even a half slice of bread will trigger an insulin response these days.

The most recent Dr that I have seen was not able to tell me anything. He ordered a barrage of tests and everything was within normal ranges. I have an appointment to see an endocrinologist in a month and a half (soonest I could get the appointment), and I was just wondering if anyone else has experienced anything similar?
 

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I'm diabetic and my glucose levels skyrocket when I ride hard, even with no additional carb ingestion. I have a friend with the same issue. My doctor couldn't explain that one to me either.

Are your levels fairly stable throughout the day with out intense efforts? Do you eat cabs while riding? During races or centuries I'll eat a Gu every 45 minutes and drink Gatorade.
 

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I do eat while riding. Even on a 10 mile ride I will bring two servings of gel and two water bottles. I don't typically use it all but it is there if I need it.

Yes, my levels are stable with no intense efforts.
 

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Daren said:
I'm diabetic and my glucose levels skyrocket when I ride hard, even with no additional carb ingestion. I have a friend with the same issue. My doctor couldn't explain that one to me either.

Are your levels fairly stable throughout the day with out intense efforts? Do you eat cabs while riding? During races or centuries I'll eat a Gu every 45 minutes and drink Gatorade.
I'm diabetic as well and I can explain what's happening. When you ride hard your liver dumps glucose into your blood stream. I've experienced it with heavy weight lifting and training doing intervals.

Couple of tips. Don't load up on carbs before your ride. Diabetics work differently. We don't store energy well. Make sure your blood sugar level is not high before you ride it just goes higher once you get on the bike. Drink lots of water before you ride and during your ride. Lots of diabetics suffer from dehydration. We may not feel we are but studies have shown because of how our metabolism works and kidney's liver and blood sugar levels our tissues struggle with retaining water.

Long easy rides are different. Our bodies have the chance to use the sugar reserves in our blood and then use fat stores.

When I ride I make my own gatorade, just because gatorade is mostly sugar. There are plenty of recipes on-line to make your own. Cut back the sugar content in the recipe and eat small amounts of food during your ride. Low blood sugars can be hard to recover from and it takes 15-20 minutes for the body to get itself back to the right level after eating.

The last tip. Don't ride hard out of the gate. Longer warm-ups are better I don't run any intervals or sprint until I have ridden easy for 30 minutes. Once I started doing this my blood sugar levels didn't spike and I don't suffer from a high blood sugar "bonk".
 

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Keitone said:
I do eat while riding. Even on a 10 mile ride I will bring two servings of gel and two water bottles. I don't typically use it all but it is there if I need it.

Yes, my levels are stable with no intense efforts.

I just want to qualify I'm no doctor or so I'm just speaking from experience. I now eat low glycemic foods such as bananas or oranges (with all the pulp) before a ride. It seemed to help.

Get your doc or endo to check your thyroid as well. A bad thyroid can bugger things up.
 
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