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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Wind Turbine technology? I ask because I am thinking of hedging my bets on career longevity and am thinking of catching the next career wave to ride to retirement. I see that training/cert programs are popping up, am interested in seeing what all was involved.
 

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gazing from the shadows
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Rolando said:
If I remember correctly, Rocco has done some work in this field. Maybe he will see this....Bump
Moneyman has done some due diligence on that for investment purposes, maybe he can chime in?

I'll alter the title of the thread so people have a better idea of the content.
 

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FWIW, the GE plant near Round Rock / Georgetown TX is doing a steady bidness shipping out the turbine cores. And the blades seem to be coming from somewhere in the Houston area.
 

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corning my own beef
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I'm in the utility biz, so we always have our finger on/in "alternative" technologies. Can you narrow down the specific info you're looking for? I'm unaware of training/cert programs -- are they related to sales/promotion, or some area of engineering?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Post construction/erection

JustTooBig said:
I'm in the utility biz, so we always have our finger on/in "alternative" technologies. Can you narrow down the specific info you're looking for? I'm unaware of training/cert programs -- are they related to sales/promotion, or some area of engineering?
Maintenance. I did a google search here a few days ago, seems Oklahoma and Iowa are a few of the hotbeds for training these days. Something like N.Iowa CC has a 2 year degree program that has just started, also Oklahoma State has something going too. The programs seem to be popping up where the farms are located.
 

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waterproof*
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There are substantial and growing wind farms in West TX. Goggle T Boone Pickens and you should find some stats.

No idea what the maint workload / oppty's are like but I expect you'd have lots of competition b/c that's also the oil patch so there's a long-deep-rooted blue collar / do everything labor pool out there.

Besides, do you want to live in West TX?

check Wikipedia, nice graphic here:

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipe...Wind_Resources_and_Transmission_Lines_map.jpg
 

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dir-t said:
My company does environmental assessments for the wind farm locations and transmission coorridors.
random aside: have you noticed a strong turn in the env industry leaning twoard permitting as its base?

just curious- I've been out of the industry for about 8 months now. no one in california is hiring.
 

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corning my own beef
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ARP said:
Maintenance. I did a google search here a few days ago, seems Oklahoma and Iowa are a few of the hotbeds for training these days. Something like N.Iowa CC has a 2 year degree program that has just started, also Oklahoma State has something going too. The programs seem to be popping up where the farms are located.
Yeah, I suppose that most generation sites, whether utility or privately owned, would contract out their PM work. There is quite a bit of semi-annual and annual PM work done, particularly in gen units >500kW.

You might also want to try to research to identify companies doing that sort of maintenance contracting, and ask what kind of training/certs they look for.
 

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n00bsauce
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It would be a good idea if you like livin' in the Dakotas.
 

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still shedding season
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There are four big wind farms in Northern IL/Southern WI that I know of, probably more. Mike Rowe had a Dirty Jobs episode on the maintenance gig - nowhere near as bad as some of the stuff he does but you better not be afraid of heights. Some of these things are ginormous - I've seen pictures of freighters coming into Duluth MN from Europe (thru the seaway, moreons). Duluth handles a lot of this stuff bound for the Dakotas, etc.
 

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corning my own beef
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kykr13 said:
There are four big wind farms in Northern IL/Southern WI that I know of, probably more. Mike Rowe had a Dirty Jobs episode on the maintenance gig - nowhere near as bad as some of the stuff he does but you better not be afraid of heights. Some of these things are ginormous - I've seen pictures of freighters coming into Duluth MN from Europe (thru the seaway, moreons). Duluth handles a lot of this stuff bound for the Dakotas, etc.
Yeah... some of the bigger units are 300+' at the housing with blades close to 150'. Fortunately, a majority of the maintenance is inside the units. There are electrical, control, mechanical and comm systems on board. Don't know if the maintenance guys specialize or not?
 

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n00bsauce
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The Wisconsin wind farms are small potatoes in comparison to what is on the drawing boards for the Dakotas. The greatest potential for wind generation in the US and Canada is the northern plains/pothole country. That's where the majority of the jobs would be for large scale wind turbines so you better like livin' there.
 

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Creakyknees said:
FWIW, the GE plant near Round Rock / Georgetown TX is doing a steady bidness shipping out the turbine cores. And the blades seem to be coming from somewhere in the Houston area.
Blades are coming into the port from overseas.
 

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It's all ball bearings
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dir-t said:
My company does environmental assessments for the wind farm locations and transmission coorridors.

Same here.

In fact, I'm currently writing a permitting report about geologically hazardous areas for a proposed installation of wind turbine structures.

What a coincidence.


"Site-Specific Recommendations:
The work will involve installing one new structure (proposed structure XXX-XXX 0/5) at a new location. Additional crushed rock or driving mats may be required to access the temporary disturbance area if construction occurs during wet periods. The contractor should avoid disturbing steep slopes to the south of the site. A sandbag sediment barrier and/or silt fence should be installed prior to commencing work around the structure. We recommend that soil cuttings be removed from the site. We also recommend that disturbed areas be seeded and mulched."
[/yawn]
 

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2cflyr said:
random aside: have you noticed a strong turn in the env industry leaning twoard permitting as its base?

just curious- I've been out of the industry for about 8 months now. no one in california is hiring.
I don't know that I've noticed a strong turn. It seems we've always (for my 6 yrs in the field) relied on it as a big portion of our work. Part of that may be my location (MT) - field work gets awful slow in the winter.
 
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