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Sticky Valentine
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Don't do it. Or do. Whatever.

hth


joe
 

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Carbon Fiber = Explode!
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I don't think you can run it fixed though... Or can you without breaking the rubber? No way right?
 

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CleavesF said:
I don't think you can run it fixed though... Or can you without breaking the rubber? No way right?
Why wouldn't you be able to? Back-pedaling just reverses the force flow. Forward-pedaling has the top run of the belt/chain drive the rear cog, with the bottom run slack. Back-pedal braking has the bottom run of the belt /chain drive the front chainwheel, with the top run slack.
 

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No Crybabies
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jolt?

wim said:
Why wouldn't you be able to? Back-pedaling just reverses the force flow. Forward-pedaling has the top run of the belt/chain drive the rear cog, with the bottom run slack. Back-pedal braking has the bottom run of the belt /chain drive the front chainwheel, with the top run slack.
What about the sudden jolt of trying to stop? While I'd never have the strength just pedaling, I destroyed a EAI steel cog one time by braking hard.
 

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Fixed said:
What about the sudden jolt of trying to stop? While I'd never have the strength just pedaling, I destroyed a EAI steel cog one time by braking hard.
Well yes, jumping on a back pedal would snap the slack lower run of a chain or a belt suddenly very tight. But my point was that there's no difference in force direction and magnitude between running a chain or running a belt on a fixed gear.

Of course, if you're thinking that a belt doesn't have the strength of a chain, you may well be be right. My thought is that a belt is actually stronger because forces are distributed over a much larger area than tiny chain rivets tugging at thin-ass side plates, but it's just a guess.
 

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duh...
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wim said:
Well yes, jumping on a back pedal would snap the slack lower run of a chain or a belt suddenly very tight. But my point was that there's no difference in force direction and magnitude between running a chain or running a belt on a fixed gear.

Of course, if you're thinking that a belt doesn't have the strength of a chain, you may well be be right. My thought is that a belt is actually stronger because forces are distributed over a much larger area than tiny chain rivets tugging at thin-ass side plates, but it's just a guess.


I don't think belt strength is the issue, but maybe slipping of the "teeth". never seen one of these in-person so wtf do I know
 

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No Crybabies
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my thinking, too

FatTireFred said:
I don't think belt strength is the issue, but maybe slipping of the "teeth". never seen one of these in-person so wtf do I know
Same here. I was just speculating why they would have ss and not fixed.
 

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Maybe marketing.

Fixed said:
Same here. I was just speculating why they would have ss and not fixed.
Interesting question. Perhaps it's because belt drives and shaft drives are usually pitched to the casual-rider crowd that doesn't want to get its pant leg dirty—not to knowledgeable cyclists willing to learn or already knowing how to ride fixed. I'm sure you'll never see a fixed in an L.L. Bean catalogue, belt or chain.
 

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first thought...how to mount it through the frame?

the answer isn't very elogant: decouple the frame!

that's a deal breaker for me.

would be stealthy quiet though.
 

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Carbon Fiber = Explode!
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FatTireFred said:
I don't think belt strength is the issue, but maybe slipping of the "teeth". never seen one of these in-person so wtf do I know
See, in my book I was thinking that skid stopping under high torque could snap the belt. I mean people snap chains all the time right?

But then again, I don't know either, it was just speculation.

the thing I really want to know is how much does it stretch? I've read barely have any, and I find that hard to believe. Belt stretch, depending on whether it's more or less than a chain ultimately decides what I'm gonna ride in the future.

The overall promise of no oil and no rust is too interesting to me not to be interested. Especially since I keep my bike outside in winter.,
 

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CleavesF said:
the thing I really want to know is how much does it stretch? I've read barely have any, and I find that hard to believe. Belt stretch, depending on whether it's more or less than a chain ultimately decides what I'm gonna ride in the future.

The overall promise of no oil and no rust is too interesting to me not to be interested. Especially since I keep my bike outside in winter.,
I think you can get a good indication of belt stretch and breakage by reading some stuff on automotive engine timing belts. In my understanding, they don't stretch. But engine heat, oil and water (especially antifreeze) slowly compromise the belt structure, and that's why many timing belts break long before the engine is worn out. On a bicycle, I can imagine a belt lasting much longer than a chain if the belt is kept free of chemicals.
 

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Carbon Fiber = Explode!
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Thanks wim, I guess it's time for me to get "quotes" on couplers... lol.
 

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Yo no fui.
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I drove a Saturn wearing a leather belt just last night.
 

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Belt stretch and wear really isn't an issue on a bicycle. They use them on motorcycles for crying out loud.

But there must be some other issues. Trek intro'd the "District" last August at their dealer show. Our store manager rode it and loved it. We ordered a full size run and are still waiting. Last word is it won't be out until May or so.
 
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