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I posted this question on MTBR too. After a stress test and cardiac catherization, I've been diagnosed with a Myocardial Bridge and a 75% blockage and %30 blockage in 2 branch arteries. The blockages are going to be treated with meds, asperine routine and Zorcor, and watching my diet. The Bridge is another issue. My cardiologist recommended, if I want to keep cycling at a high level,(fast group rides and mtb races) that I have the bridge repaired, which would be surgury. A myocardial bridge is when some of the heart muscle is wrapped around, in my case, the main left artery. When the heart beats, it compresses the artery, then releases it. When the heart rate is high, the threat could be an arrhythmia, which can cause sudden cardiac death. I'm 49, been cycling (MTB and road) for 10 years and been racing, (MTB sport class, 24 hours, 100 miler's) for about 5 years. I never displayed any symptoms related to the bridge according to my doctors. My symptoms were a result of exercised induced asthma. My family doc was treating me for this and recommended, just in case, a stress test, and the stress test showed some eratic bloodflow, thus the cardiac catherization, which detected the bridge. I have an appointment with a surgeon in a few weeks to discuss my options. My doc recommended I stay off the mountain bike. I've been riding my road bike, and keeping my efforts easy to moderate, but this whole thing has me pretty freaked out. Apparently this condition occurs at birth, so I've always had it.
Anyone else have a similar story? I'm hoping this isn't the end of cycling for me. Its more than a hobby as you all know.
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Man, that sucks pretty hardcore. I hope everything works out. It's gonna be tough to make that kind of choice, it depends on how much you want to keep riding versus the risk of the surgery. I'm not too knowledgeable on this sort of thing, but I wish you the best of luck.
 

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cycling after heart bypass surgery

Back in jan 05 I thought I had indigestion and just by luck I had it checked out. Well I needed a by pass opèration, man was I supprised, I had no indication before that. I started cycling back in 97 and felt like I was in good shape and did over 7000 miles in 04.They had to replace 5 arteries I was lucky that I went in that day and had it checked out, I could have popped when I was out riding.It took about 8 weeks before I could ride again but I feel better than ever and I hope it lasts.Everyone has a different situation but it sounds like your on the right track by getting it checked into. I am 63 years old and try to ride 150 -200 miles per week and would like to hear from people that have had a similar experience.Any advise or opinions would be appreciated.

Chris V.
Fort Worth
 

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I was diagnosed with Atrial Fibrillation, and abnormal heart rythym, in 1981. A Fib is an electrical disturbance within the heart, that causes the Atria to "flutter" instead of contracting normally. The risk from this is stroke, & I had to take blood thinners for years. The rythym was controlled with drugs. I took them when needed. Later, in the mid 90's it got worse. OK, so what doesn't get worse with age. Back on the drugs again. Finally,in 2003, I had an A Fib breakthrough that couldn't be controlled by drugs. I was in AF 100% of the time for 3 months. I was on so many drugs that all I could do was sit on the couch & drool. Finally my doc, scheduled me for an ablation. It's done somewhat like a catheterization, but instead of opening blocked arteries, (which I have none), it burns scar tissue on the inside of the atria, so that the misfiring nerve impulses can't reach their target.

I've been in normal rythym for a couple of years now, & I feel absolutely supercharged.
 

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Mr. Versatile said:
I was diagnosed with Atrial Fibrillation, and abnormal heart rythym, in 1981. A Fib is an electrical disturbance within the heart, that causes the Atria to "flutter" instead of contracting normally. The risk from this is stroke, & I had to take blood thinners for years. The rythym was controlled with drugs. I took them when needed. Later, in the mid 90's it got worse. OK, so what doesn't get worse with age. Back on the drugs again. Finally,in 2003, I had an A Fib breakthrough that couldn't be controlled by drugs. I was in AF 100% of the time for 3 months. I was on so many drugs that all I could do was sit on the couch & drool. Finally my doc, scheduled me for an ablation. It's done somewhat like a catheterization, but instead of opening blocked arteries, (which I have none), it burns scar tissue on the inside of the atria, so that the misfiring nerve impulses can't reach their target.

I've been in normal rythym for a couple of years now, & I feel absolutely supercharged.
That's amazing to hear a success story such as this.

Sounds like something they could of easily screwed up.
 
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