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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
New thread, old questions. I was in the LBS over the weekend gazing longingly at some NOS 28 hole Record hubs and talking about wheels. The owner said that if I wanted light wheels, I should consider getting some NOS vintage tubular rims (around 375 gms/rim) and go that route.

Has anyone with no previous tubular experience recently switched from clinchers to tubulars? If so, please talk about your experience.

Thanks.
 
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ox_rider said:
New thread, old questions. I was in the LBS over the weekend gazing longingly at some NOS 28 hole Record hubs and talking about wheels. The owner said that if I wanted light wheels, I should consider getting some NOS vintage tubular rims (around 375 gms/rim) and go that route.

Has anyone with no previous tubular experience recently switched from clinchers to tubulars? If so, please talk about your experience.

Thanks.
You should stay as far as from Tubulars as you can, they will kill you.

What is the address and phone number of that bike shop?? :D ( 28 hole Record Hubs - damn!)
 

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I made the switch a year ago and even tho I am back to clincher I still prefer tubular. I am only on clincher because the ease of changing tires when riding. And for training. But i prefer the ride of tubular. Gluing can be a disaster you first time but the more you do it the better you get at it. I started using Tufo Extreme tape and found it to work for me, others won't touch the tuff. The tufo tape had me up and rolling in about 10 minutes where as the glue was a much more particular process.
 

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I personally like the zen of wheel buidling and tubular gluing but it does take a bit of time and I dont know how much you are willing to commit.
I strictly race tubulars for cross and use my cross wheels with road tires on them for a few select races dirt road escapades. Clinchers are definitely more convinent for most in the event of a flat as well as when installing new tires.
They are awfully comfortable, not for their legendary suppleness but the lower PSI you can run them at-which in addition to the superior weigth over tires tubes and rim strips puts less air in the tire thus further reducing weight
 

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Weight reduction

seahuston said:
in addition to the superior weigth over tires tubes and rim strips puts less air in the tire thus further reducing weight
First of all, the extra weight of carrying a spare tire (ca. 180 gm penalty over a spare tube) cancels out most of the weight savings. Lower pressure means less air thus saving weight? Have you done the math? Hint, dropping from 7 bar to 6 bar saves less than a gram per tire :)
 

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For the 47th time......Tubies are for racing.
The #1 use..Criteriums. They corner better, they weigh less, and you can ride them flat to the pits, for a free lap.
The #2 use..Road races.....Meh. Unless you are in a race with neutral support (and can motor back to the pack at 30 mph), the only advantage is a few less flats.
The #3 use..Time trials.....Forget it...Modern clinchers are faster.
 

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Dammit guys! I'm gonna hafta get my pair of Vittorias fixed and put em on my cross wheels now! I miss the ride of a good tubular. :nod

I usually race cross and track. Last two holdouts where tubulars actually DO make more sense.

M
 

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I go back and forth.
Tubulars have a very nice ride, but grumpy is right, they really are for racing where you typically have some support.
Kerry, in unusual fashion, is wrong. Sure you'll end up carrying a spare tubie in your back pocket, but you can get a light one and remember, that weight in the back pocket is dead weight, not rotating weight and there is a BIG difference.

The reason I'm back to clinchers is simply that no one else I ride with rides tubies and if I'm out on a long ride and get two flats, I'm out of luck.
 

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I switched to tubulars for about a year as I had all the carbon wheelsets from the roadbikereview shootout.

The learning curve is high when it comes to gluing and getting it right. My first glue pair was crap. My tenth was pretty good. My first flat sucked. By my third, it was ok.

The advantages are better ride smoothness with carbon rims. Carbon rims are great for tubulars since they don't need a clincher sidewall and add a bunch of material. Ride was better. Rolling resistance and traction seems better but it's very slight.

Downsides are money and money. Braking is not that good for carbon. And of course the installationi/maintenance is just off the scale.

In the end, I was getting what I believed to be a 1% advantage and a bigger disadvantage. And I really needed to work on the 99% which was my body. And the time and money could be better used elsewhere. So I gave it up... for now.

A couple of years later, I'm here playing with Hutchinson Tubeless. These are the real deal I think. And the tipping point is good and I'm starting to think most people should be on tubeless road clinchers.

fc
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Tubeless

francois said:
I switched to tubulars for about a year as I had all the carbon wheelsets from the roadbikereview shootout.

The learning curve is high when it comes to gluing and getting it right. My first glue pair was crap. My tenth was pretty good. My first flat sucked. By my third, it was ok.

The advantages are better ride smoothness with carbon rims. Carbon rims are great for tubulars since they don't need a clincher sidewall and add a bunch of material. Ride was better. Rolling resistance and traction seems better but it's very slight.

Downsides are money and money. Braking is not that good for carbon. And of course the installationi/maintenance is just off the scale.

In the end, I was getting what I believed to be a 1% advantage and a bigger disadvantage. And I really needed to work on the 99% which was my body. And the time and money could be better used elsewhere. So I gave it up... for now.

A couple of years later, I'm here playing with Hutchinson Tubeless. These are the real deal I think. And the tipping point is good and I'm starting to think most people should be on tubeless road clinchers.

fc
What do you like about the tubeless and what on earth are "tubular clinchers?" Are these jumbo shrimp?
 

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ox_rider said:
What do you like about the tubeless and what on earth are "tubular clinchers?" Are these jumbo shrimp?
Tubeless??
- rolling resistance is awesome. At 85 psi, they float through rough roads like a hovercraft. Well not quite but it's really smooth.
- grip is awesome and the tire is stable during cornering at these lower pressures.
- flat protection. With some sealant added, I don't think I'll get a flat anymore. I'm not carrying flat tire tools now so weight savings??

Downsides:
- single sourced from Hutchinson
- installation is harder but nowhere near tubulars.


'Tubular Clinchers'? Don't use that term. Such an animal exists but it is the brain fart of Tufo. It is the worst of all worlds. Tufo sucks btw. :D

photo: my current setup

fc
 

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I run with 3 pairs of tubulars and 1 pair of wheels clincher. I switched to tubulars as I was getting tired of those stupid pinch flats that are prevalent in clincher wheels.
I dont glue the tires on myself; I get my local LBS to do it for me. If I get a flat on the road with my tubulars: I just rip the old tire off and put on the new tire with tufo glue tape on temporarily. I havent yet got 2 flats on 1 ride with tubulars; and I made the switch approx 5-6 years ago. tubulars cost more $$$ for sure; but I think its worth it if you can afford them. tubulars best for racing in my opinion.

C.
 

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I did almost 2 years ago...

and I love it! I have had 2 flat in just over 4400 miles. One was sealed on the fly with Liquid sealent. The other was a tear so I was SOL.

I bought a 160g tiny Tufo as a spare to ride with, but with sealent and carrying Vittoria Pit stop, I have never used it or taken it with me.

The one time I was stuck, I just called for a ride. With clinchers I avg a flat every 2-3 months.

With tubulars if you flat the front on a turn, you won't have to worry about the tire leaving the rims and crashing.

Now gluing them can be a hassle. My first glue job was done just about perfect (except for a little around the valve stem) except for a bit of glue on the tires and rims. Just a little extra work to clean them. That was the rear, the forn was as clean as you can basically get. But for me, gluing tires is a wate of my time. The wife complains about glue vapors and it takes to much time for me to go back and add layers of glue.

The LBS only charges me $10 to glue one, so that's money well spent. It's just easier.

I have some clinchers now as well and like them. IMO the Tubulars ride better hands down. That's MO and I am sticking to it.

No would I go tubulars again? yes, but probably only on carbon rims, not aluminum. Like others said, clinchers are so close to tubulars in weight now and the tires are about as good.

If you don't mind an extra bit of work and enjoy riding and your bike then go for it!

I don't and never will race.
 

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Rotating weight

Johnnysmooth said:
remember, that weight in the back pocket is dead weight, not rotating weight and there is a BIG difference.
In what way? The only difference between rotating and non-rotating weight is when you accelerate, like jumping out of corners in a crit race. Otherwise, weight is weight. Once you've spun the wheels up to speed, it makes no difference. And even in the constant acceleration situation, rotating weight ONLY makes a difference in total energy expenditure if you have to brake before each acceleration, because otherwise the extra energy it takes to spin up a heavier wheel is returned when you coast to slow down. Finally, even in a crit where you had to brake hard for every corner for an hour, the difference in enegy expenditure between heavy and light rims/tires is on the order of 0.5%.
 

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I switched to tubulars a few months back. I loved them. I built the wheels, I glued the tires (use electrical tape on the sidewalls and let the glue flash solid and you won't have a mess). I like the artisan feel of it and it made me feel like a purist (I sailed for many years and always did it without a motor...purist). By glueing the tires to the rims I felt as if I built the bike from stem to stern, everything. The only thing I didn't do was forge the parts and sew the tires.

The ride was sweet...especially on nice tires.

But...I am back on clinchers. After 4 months and 1500 miles of no flats, I had a flat on the way to work (sidewall flat) and then a nail went through the bottom and came out the sidewall of my second rear a week later. Two phone calls of shame to the wife for a pickup, as sealant didn't seal them and when I glue a tire...I GLUE A TIRE. Hard to remove in the heat and sweat of Okinawa.

I have respoked both wheelsets with Aeroheads and Deep V's (vice Reflex and Deep V Elites) and am living life more confident.

I miss the ride and don't feel as "pure" but afer all it is just feel. I could see using them in a Crit but not anything else where it is all or nothing or you can't switch out an entire wheel and keep going.

My two cents.

Ryan

PS...I have a set of Reflex rims with 400 miles on them and Conti Sprinters with same mileage (one need repair and the other is perfect) for sale. In addition, a pair of Deep V Elites, 32H with 3 tires. Tires are generic tubulars. One needs repair, it's brother is perfect and a brand new spare if anyone is interested. Make offer!
 

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IMO (as if you care) tubes win out mainly due to better wheels (if performence is your goal). The bottom line for me in the endless tube/clincher/carbon/steel/campy/shamono/areo/weight/rotational mass/rolling resistance debate is ride whatever you like. Its ALL good stuff compared to the ole days when we didn't have so many options.
have a nice day
 

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I don't think I'll get a flat anymore. I'm not carrying flat tire tools now so weight savings??
... which is offset by the weight of the cell phone you should be carrying so you can call someone to pick you up when the hole you get in the tire is just a bit larger than what the sealant will seal. :)
 
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