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I am looking to purchase a Fork Mounted bike workstand so I can do some of my own maintenance. I have a Carbon Scott bike and think I would like to buy the Race Workstand type that you either clamp in your fork or Rear stay and have to remove a wheel. I know there is some inconvenience with having to remove a wheel but really it only take's a couple seconds... Also I don't want to to take a chance of damaging my frame etc.... So I am interested in seeing if anyone is using one of the above mentioned models or one similar that they would recommend...

I have searched and have seen a few people posting photo's from manufacture websites of ones available but haven't seen any real world photo's of one in use or any opinions about how people like them compared to the conventional seat tube clamp work stands..

If someone could I would love to see how a real world bike clamps into one of these with the rear wheel removed and front wheel on. I have only seen a photo of the reverse application.... Please post up if you have one and are happy or unhappy with it and give your opinion either way... I would like some real opinions before I fork out the money...
 

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Yep, that's the best kind of stand to buy. They're great for all kinds of work, the height is easy to adjust, and you're not going to break anything on the bike.

It's a great stand for washing as well, as it's really easy to spin the bike around.
 

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I have the PRS-20 and the only complaint I have is that I have to take the bolt out that holds the arm up or the nds crank arm hits it when I spin the crank. I've tried grinding the bolt as short as it will go, but the 'knob' is still in the way. I got mine when they first came out, so maybe they've fixed this...
 

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lacofdfireman said:
So can someone get me a picture of the bike hooked up in one of these stands with the front wheel attached? I would like to see how it looks to see if it seems workable for me...
Do you have some sort of physical limitation that would make you unable to use this stand like someone else? If it works, it works. Unless you are planning to use this for something other than a bicycle it will suit your needs.

http://autobus.cyclingnews.com/tech.php?id=tech/2005/reviews/park_tool_prs-20
 

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I personally hate re-doing the cabling while using this type of stand. The design obscures the bottom bracket area, so it's a pain to thread the front and rear deraillleur cables while the bike is in the stand.

I much prefer the traditional shop stand that holds the bike by the seatpost.

Other thing that's annoying is you have to remove the front wheel when you want to do maintainence on the bike. So if you want to adjust brake pads, or brake cables, that has to be done off the stand.
 

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nightfend said:
I personally hate re-doing the cabling while using this type of stand. The design obscures the bottom bracket area, so it's a pain to thread the front and rear deraillleur cables while the bike is in the stand.

I much prefer the traditional shop stand that holds the bike by the seatpost.

Other thing that's annoying is you have to remove the front wheel when you want to do maintainence on the bike. So if you want to adjust brake pads, or brake cables, that has to be done off the stand.
I use both: I have a Park PRS-4W u-bolted to one of the jack posts in the basement. Probably the most stable stand I have ever used, but not very portable. I also own a Tacx Cycle Spider Team, which is the workstand that prompted Park to create the PRS-20 and, ATMO, is still a better design. That's the one that goes on the road and is a secondary stand for group wrenching in the man-cave.

Park's traditional, cast Adjustable Linkage Clamp is fast and convenient, but unless it's attached to those big-ass cast iron floor plates, or bolted to a wall, post or bench, it doesn't provide a whole lot of stability for loosening seriously stuck parts (like frozen-in bottom brackets). Even the old PRS-5 couldn't hold a candle stability-wise to those euro stands that held the dropouts and the bottom bracket shell.

As far as difficulty cabling bikes in a beam-type stand, I haven't noticed it. YMMV, of course. And as far as not being able to work ont the front brake on these stands, that's why they usually feature a second clamp for the rear dropouts, so you can flip the bike around, reinstall the front wheel, and get back to business.

IIRC, sawhorse/beam-type stands evovled from the race-mechanic tradition of taking both wheels off the bike, throwing the frame on the stand, thoroughly washing the bike, inspecting, lubing, and replacing what is needed, doing the wheels separately, and reinstalling the wheels when the bike is on the ground before moving on to the next bike. These stands provide 360-degree access and enough stability for torquing on BB's if needed. Might take a few more seconds to get the bike on and off, but many mechanics who use these stands day-in and day-out would gladly trade that for more stability.

ATMO.
 

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Slow Eddie said:
I use both: I have a Park PRS-4W u-bolted to one of the jack posts in the basement. Probably the most stable stand I have ever used, but not very portable. I also own a Tacx Cycle Spider Team, which is the workstand that prompted Park to create the PRS-20 and, ATMO, is still a better design. That's the one that goes on the road and is a secondary stand for group wrenching in the man-cave.

Park's traditional, cast Adjustable Linkage Clamp is fast and convenient, but unless it's attached to those big-ass cast iron floor plates, or bolted to a wall, post or bench, it doesn't provide a whole lot of stability for loosening seriously stuck parts (like frozen-in bottom brackets). Even the old PRS-5 couldn't hold a candle stability-wise to those euro stands that held the dropouts and the bottom bracket shell.

As far as difficulty cabling bikes in a beam-type stand, I haven't noticed it. YMMV, of course. And as far as not being able to work ont the front brake on these stands, that's why they usually feature a second clamp for the rear dropouts, so you can flip the bike around, reinstall the front wheel, and get back to business.

IIRC, sawhorse/beam-type stands evovled from the race-mechanic tradition of taking both wheels off the bike, throwing the frame on the stand, thoroughly washing the bike, inspecting, lubing, and replacing what is needed, doing the wheels separately, and reinstalling the wheels when the bike is on the ground before moving on to the next bike. These stands provide 360-degree access and enough stability for torquing on BB's if needed. Might take a few more seconds to get the bike on and off, but many mechanics who use these stands day-in and day-out would gladly trade that for more stability.

ATMO.
This post is spot on.
I would never go back to a clamp style stand.
As to doing cables...... clamp the fork down. Lift the BB out of the cradle and rest the chainring where the bb would normally sit. You now have tons of room/access to the underside of the BB. If you still have problems running cables like this you are doing it wrong.
Factor in that most bikes are carbon, or have a carbon post, and you would be foolish to purchase a clamp style stand. Talked to a guy last week who had to have his CLX2.0 repaired because some tool of a mechanic clamped the TT in the stand.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
mtbbmet said:
Do you have some sort of physical limitation that would make you unable to use this stand like someone else? If it works, it works. Unless you are planning to use this for something other than a bicycle it will suit your needs.

http://autobus.cyclingnews.com/tech.php?id=tech/2005/reviews/park_tool_prs-20

No physical limitations just wanted a stand that won't damage my Carbon bike.. So I spent some time in a local shop that is real good and he talked me into getting a regular seatpost stand. I think I will end up buying the Feedback sports stand. He had one on the floor that looked really nice. He said they only use the seatpost kind and they have a very high end bike shop with lots of carbon bikes and he says he wouldn't use the fork mount kind...
 

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I bought one earlier this year, and even though it's only about 20 pounds, it does feel kinda heavy and bulky. Probably should have spent the extra money for the aluminum legged one, but I guess the extra mass adds some stability.

The only thing I don't like about it is the cotter pin that holds the beam in place, if I tighten the beam up good and snug on the brackets that hold it, the holes don't line up exactly, and I can't get the pin to go through. I have to slacken off the bracket a bit. Also, the strap around the BB seems to slip out of place rather easily.

I like it for cleaning bikes, you can take both wheels off and then have ready access to all parts of the frame, even the hard to get to spots around the bottom bracket and chainrings.

Gotta do some cleaning on the winter beater bike, so when I do, I'll try to remember to snap some pics.
 

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lacofdfireman said:
No physical limitations just wanted a stand that won't damage my Carbon bike.. So I spent some time in a local shop that is real good and he talked me into getting a regular seatpost stand. I think I will end up buying the Feedback sports stand. He had one on the floor that looked really nice. He said they only use the seatpost kind and they have a very high end bike shop with lots of carbon bikes and he says he wouldn't use the fork mount kind...
I would find a better bike shop. Just because they have lots of high end bikes does not automatically make them smrt.
Odd that he wants to sell you a stand that he has on the floor. That never happens. I can't think of a single application that would make a post clamp style better than a beam stand. But it's your money to waste.
 

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I have one and like it a lot, except for this:

The only thing I don't like about it is the cotter pin that holds the beam in place, if I tighten the beam up good and snug on the brackets that hold it, the holes don't line up exactly, and I can't gewt the pin to go through. I have to slacken off the bracket a bit. Also, the strap around the BB seems to slip out of place rather easily.
If they fixed this, it'd be 5/5; as is I'd say 4.5/5.
 

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Good. So it's not just me and my stand.

BTW, I got mine for a real good price from Amazon, I think it was $170, or thereabouts, which was like $50 cheaper than most of the bike online sellers.
 

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The BB strap is a bit of a joke. Not sure why they even put it on.
As to earlier statements. If you work on mountain bikes with hydraulic brakes, and bleed those brakes, you may want to consider a post clamp stand. We only service road bikes at the shop, and I never bleed my own brakes at home so I never have any use for a clamp stand. That is the only situation where I think a clamp would be more beneficial than a beam.
 

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Thread is a bit old, but a few questions. I have the PRS20 (21?) picture above. I like it, since I have both steel and carbon bicycles and didn't want to clamp the post.

My problem is that I live in a place where I can't leave the stand set up. When I want to work on my bikes I have to haul it out in the backyard and set it up. The central pipe is not precisely machined so that when I'm pulling it out/sliding it up, it goes...then suddenly catches and hangs up. This usually results in my pinching my fingers or something annoying, in some way. I'm greased the heck out of the pipe, but still happens.

Then it can sometimes be a real PITH to get the pin through the arm.

Once the stand is set up, I love it. Setting it up is a slight hassle. (I use mine exclusively at home, not at races).

I was checking out the bench/wall mounted clamps they offer. Anyone using these? Most seem to rotate 360 and be able to clamp the ST, TT, or seat post. On my carbon bike my post is carbon and my TT is a bit flattened. Might not be easy to clamp.

Just thought I'd see if anyone could offer some feedback on these. I could bolt one to the side/floor of my porch in the backyard and just leave it there. Could cover it when it rains.

Seems like a decent investment over pinching my fingers and cursing every time I do bike repair; I save the cursing for when I've already started wrenching:)
 

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I have one, used it for about 2yrs now. Works ok. A lot of carbon bikes have no place to clamp a normal stand onto. My Ridley Noah, for example...Shaped seat mast, shaped top tube=no place to clamp with a traditional work stand.

The pin that fixes the stand's arm in place was a poor fit. Fixed it. The BB 'strap'? Threw that right away..no point that I could see to use that. The height adjusting collar post is kinda sticky. I have to put my foot on the bottom and hold it down to raise the work height most times.

I think it is a good design but they got greedy and set their quality control/production quality standards a bit low to make more profit, resulting in a stand that has to be 'fixed' to work like it should. Satisfactory, but they should have taken a bit more care in production to eliminate the very slight operating 'glitches'...that fixing pin and the off-size fit of the main column that keeps it from raising lowering smoothly.
 
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