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I was thinking about flats as I was riding home from work today and it seems to me there are three reasons for getting them.

1. Puncher (glass,metal shards, thorns)
2. Pinch flat (hitting a pot hole or an object like a rock)
3. Impropely installed tube (tube caught between tire bead and rim hook causing the tube to puncher)

If you run tubulars you eliminate #2 and 3 which leaves #1. If you were to use a good sealant like stans you reduce the chances of flats from small punchers quite a bit. I run stans in my cyclocross tubbies and I'm constantly picking thorns out of them and have never had a flat. What do you all think?
I'll should say now that I AM IN KNOW WAY saying we should all run out and put a set of tubulars on our bikes. But I am curious if anyone is using them regularly and if so what has been your experiance.

Rich
 

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In my experience the only flats I've ever had are "punchers" (#1). The thing about tire sealants is they only work when the tire is rotating. So I'd definitely stay away from tubulars when touring.

Scott
 

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I can't afford good tubulars.
For the price of cheap tubulars, you can get great clinchers.
 

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I have been very fortunate with flats on my commutes. I have only had one flat on the way to work in 8 years of commuting. I have had a half dozen or so on the way home, but the majority of my flats are slow leakers that I notice at the end of the day before I leave. That takes the idea of tubulars with sealant out of the picture for me.

You can get tough tubulars but they are either expensive or ride rough.
 

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No tubulars for touing

rich caramadre said:
But I am curious if anyone is using them regularly and if so what has been your experiance.
Tubulars for touring is a BAAAAAAD idea. In hot weather, the glue bond to the rim is not strong enough to take touring loads, and you have a hard time finding tires wide enough for touring loads.
 

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Really? Please hook me up with some great $17 clinchers.

I use yellowjersey tubulars--- dirt cheap--- but not exactly the exquisite ride that people brag about as a motivation for using tubulars in the first place.

Using sealant, I simply never flat on them--- and if I do, I carry a spare.


roadfix said:
I can't afford good tubulars.
For the price of cheap tubulars, you can get great clinchers.
 

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I toured on them when I lived in Colorado, no problems. They were Tufos, I carried some sealant--never had to use it.
 

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filtersweep said:
Really? Please hook me up with some great $17 clinchers.

I use yellowjersey tubulars--- dirt cheap--- but not exactly the exquisite ride that people brag about as a motivation for using tubulars in the first place.

Using sealant, I simply never flat on them--- and if I do, I carry a spare.
It's just Wrong!
 

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no way

Not in a gazillion years would I use tubulars for commuting or touring. Tubulars are enough of a pain expense for racing and some training.

I've tried the injection sealant, and it completely failed. So, that means that if you get more than one flat, unless you are carrying multiple entire tires, you get stranded, or pull out the old sewing and patch kit.

Commuters and tourers are typically heavier anyway, so the incremental weight savings from tubulars is neglible. You're probably using heavier rims and more spokes, anyway.

On top of all that, testing shows that clinchers are actually faster, as they have less rolling resistance (unless you use hard glue).
 

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Tired commuting on tubulars. That lasted about... 2 months.

Flat+tubular= total PITA.

I would rather get 6 flats with a clincher than 1 with a tubular. Also tried the Tufo Sealant (AKA a really expensive bottle of latex)- did not work, but made a big mess.

But, if yer heart's set on doing it, which it seems to be, have fun. Tufo Tape makes on-the-road tire swaps easier.
 

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Now, as far as flatting, I find swapping sew-ups much faster and easier than replacing a tube in a clincher.
 
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I have a friend of mine who, years ago, did a cross-country trip with a buddy, both riding tubulars. Somewhere in South Dakota, they gave it up and bought some clincher rims and tires.

He said flats were common and were a pain to fix. He had much better luck with the clinchers.

He still keeps tubulars on one bicycle, but not for touring. No way, he says. Never again.
 

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rich caramadre said:
I was thinking about flats as I was riding home from work today and it seems to me there are three reasons for getting them.

1. Puncher (glass,metal shards, thorns)
2. Pinch flat (hitting a pot hole or an object like a rock)
3. Impropely installed tube (tube caught between tire bead and rim hook causing the tube to puncher)

If you run tubulars you eliminate #2 and 3 which leaves #1. If you were to use a good sealant like stans you reduce the chances of flats from small punchers quite a bit. I run stans in my cyclocross tubbies and I'm constantly picking thorns out of them and have never had a flat. What do you all think?
I'll should say now that I AM IN KNOW WAY saying we should all run out and put a set of tubulars on our bikes. But I am curious if anyone is using them regularly and if so what has been your experiance.

Rich
What the hell is a "Puncher"???
 
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