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Just Plain Bitter
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Do you already have a work stand like the PRS-10? If you do then the Topeak isn't worth the investment. If you need something to store and work on your bike then it might be worth the cash.
 

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rward325 said:
Do you already have a work stand like the PRS-10? If you do then the Topeak isn't worth the investment. If you need something to store and work on your bike then it might be worth the cash.

Thanks! I don't have a work stand, but I couldn't really tell the difference between the above choices since they both hold bikes by the top tube. I assumed, likely incorrectly, that the sportrack could double as a work stand for minor stuff. :blush2:
 

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i have the stacker and it is pretty sturdy
doesn't wobble or anything, the hooks are infinitely adjustable and the black paint is holding up VERY WELL for the amount of time i take my flat track pedals and slapped it.
hasn't scratched my bikes at all.
 

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My vote is neither, instead this:

http://www.amazon.com/Gear-Floor-Ce...=UTF8&s=sporting-goods&qid=1285107178&sr=1-95

Compression mount, zero wobble (even when I hit the bike tires with the door or the dog runs into it). Holds up to 4 bikes rather than 2 (though you do have to buy another set of hooks, holds 2 as it ships). And it's completely adjustable so it doesn't matter how odd your top tube is, or how small your bike is you can make them hang straight and space them as you wish.

I have the wood version and would absolutely buy it again. I can't bring myself to trust the free-standing or leaning ones.
 

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CougarTrek said:
My vote is neither, instead this:

http://www.amazon.com/Gear-Floor-Ce...=UTF8&s=sporting-goods&qid=1285107178&sr=1-95

Compression mount, zero wobble (even when I hit the bike tires with the door or the dog runs into it). Holds up to 4 bikes rather than 2 (though you do have to buy another set of hooks, holds 2 as it ships). And it's completely adjustable so it doesn't matter how odd your top tube is, or how small your bike is you can make them hang straight and space them as you wish.

I have the wood version and would absolutely buy it again. I can't bring myself to trust the free-standing or leaning ones.
very big EH. more expensive, and doesn't free stand. Takes extra steps in setting up, and never able to move the stand around without 20 minutes of reinstalling it to your ceiling. my sportrack stand can be slid across the floor if i ever need to get something behind it (extra wheelset,pump,shoes) There are no pros to that rack.
 

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dont mean to hijack.. but I was always under the impression that a stand should hold the bike by the seatpost to prevent crumpling a tube on the frame ( lets face it triple butted alum can be crunchy if forced the wrong way... carbon ive been told might crack?? ) am I off my rocker or is this a valid point? personally I dont have a stand to work from and for storage in tight spots I`ve used a J hook for a wheel and a section of gutter to keep the other wheel steady .. cheap, effective and keeps the bike out of the way ( use otherwise lost space higher up ) but you cant really work on your bike from it though...
 

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i hand my 20lb aluminum road bike and my 17lb carbon road bike off that same exact sportrack bike stacker and they've been 100% fine for 4 months of pretty much 24/7 hanging. i never store them anywhere else.

There are 2 support arms, which means each point where the arm contacts the top tube is only supporting half the weight: 10lbs, and 8.5lbs respectively. Thats nothing compared to the weight you fatasses :O put on the bike when you're riding it.

and my cousin also hangs his aluminum 25lb mountain bike and 17lb road bike on a similar rack with hook arms. same thing with his.
 

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skyliner1004 said:
very big EH. more expensive, and doesn't free stand. Takes extra steps in setting up, and never able to move the stand around without 20 minutes of reinstalling it to your ceiling. my sportrack stand can be slid across the floor if i ever need to get something behind it (extra wheelset,pump,shoes) There are no pros to that rack.
It's LESS expensive than the first rack.... (and can of course be had for less than that particular seller's asking price, I paid that for an oak one at full retail from my LBS, but I was sticking with Amazon...)

It takes ~10 minutes to set up, big effing deal (you'd spend the same amount of time drilling holes for a wall mounted one...)

Free standing is a HUGE MINUS in my book. I do NOT need $10,000 worth of carbon and sensitive drivetrain crashing 6ft to the floor with a metal rack on top of it because I bumped it while cleaning, or the dog hit it, or my clutzy friend leaned against it wrong, or.....

Mine's against the wall (well, out far enough for drop bars, but that's it.) and has no protruding feet on either side=less space if anything). No reason for anything to be behind it, but it would be easy to get to if there was (actually store a spare wheelset and my floor pump behind the wheel line of the lower bike and simply reach over the bike, grab object, slide it out).

If I wanted to move the thing it would take less than 5 minutes. (un-tension it by a few turns, move it, re-tension a few turns...unless of course the height of your ceiling changes by more than a foot from one side of the room to another....)

Clearly you've never seen or used the rack and just want to make mountains out of mole-hills in defense of your chosen "free standing" rack (until the day it's not free standing and you are replacing your frame)
 

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Marty01 said:
dont mean to hijack.. but I was always under the impression that a stand should hold the bike by the seatpost to prevent crumpling a tube on the frame ( lets face it triple butted alum can be crunchy if forced the wrong way... carbon ive been told might crack?? ) am I off my rocker or is this a valid point? personally I dont have a stand to work from and for storage in tight spots I`ve used a J hook for a wheel and a section of gutter to keep the other wheel steady .. cheap, effective and keeps the bike out of the way ( use otherwise lost space higher up ) but you cant really work on your bike from it though...

If you are CLAMPING the bike (repair stand, some car racks) you should not clamp to the top (or really any other) tube on a lightweight bike. The clamping force can crumple a tube or otherwise damage it.

In home storage racks the bike is just resting on the hooks (typically two to balance the weight). It's no different than you picking it up.
 

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CougarTrek said:
Free standing is a HUGE MINUS in my book. I do NOT need $10,000 worth of carbon and sensitive drivetrain crashing 6ft to the floor with a metal rack on top of it because I bumped it while cleaning, or the dog hit it, or my clutzy friend leaned against it wrong, or...
Exactly. Plus, with my setup, it's easy to sweep and mop the floor without moving the bikes.

The non-locking version is just $40 each.
 

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Nice looking setup there, but the OP mentioned living in an apartment. As such I assume drilling holes in the wall is a no-no and I imagine a compression type stand would also damage the ceiling/floor, at least in my experience with such devices, they have at the very least left marks on the ceiling and floor where the ends touched and were tightened down to provide the hold needed to keep the device upright. If the OP doesn't have any problems with drilling holes or any worries about marks left by compression type stands, then ignore my post, which will probably happen anyway, but eh.
 

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I use a red oak, lean-to type rack:



Another bike rests on similar extensions above this one. Never had a problem with it falling or being knocked over. I do use a velcro strap, not seen in this photo, to keep the front wheel from flopping around. As you can see, I don't even bother to remove my pump and still no problem. Some might complain about the extensions marring the paint under the top tube over time which could be an issue if you don't mount a pump under the top tube. It's a legitimate concern. I've covered the hooks with pieces of old inner tubes before. You could try that or something similar.
 

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Great looking setup. Who makes the racks? At $40 , I want a couple.

QUOTE=brucew]Exactly. Plus, with my setup, it's easy to sweep and mop the floor without moving the bikes.

The non-locking version is just $40 each.[/QUOTE]
 

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CougarTrek said:
It's LESS expensive than the first rack.... (and can of course be had for less than that particular seller's asking price, I paid that for an oak one at full retail from my LBS, but I was sticking with Amazon...)

It takes ~10 minutes to set up, big effing deal (you'd spend the same amount of time drilling holes for a wall mounted one...)

Free standing is a HUGE MINUS in my book. I do NOT need $10,000 worth of carbon and sensitive drivetrain crashing 6ft to the floor with a metal rack on top of it because I bumped it while cleaning, or the dog hit it, or my clutzy friend leaned against it wrong, or.....

Mine's against the wall (well, out far enough for drop bars, but that's it.) and has no protruding feet on either side=less space if anything). No reason for anything to be behind it, but it would be easy to get to if there was (actually store a spare wheelset and my floor pump behind the wheel line of the lower bike and simply reach over the bike, grab object, slide it out).

If I wanted to move the thing it would take less than 5 minutes. (un-tension it by a few turns, move it, re-tension a few turns...unless of course the height of your ceiling changes by more than a foot from one side of the room to another....)

Clearly you've never seen or used the rack and just want to make mountains out of mole-hills in defense of your chosen "free standing" rack (until the day it's not free standing and you are replacing your frame)
uh the topeak is on another level, the basic thing you're talking about is just a bike hanger, like the sportrack model, so YES IT IS more expensive. and the floor standing one can be put against the wall also, only an idiot wouldn't be able to think of this. its all good, you're backing up your more permanant model that stays in 1 place. my rack stays in 1 place also, but doesn't require mounting to my floor and ceiling. and no, the bikes do not tip over, which kind of idiot company would release a rack that cannot stand upright with bikes on it? that would be a big failure, like you.

i'll let you know when my bike falls off the bike rack for no reason though.
 

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I use these also

I have the aluminum version. In London, I had two holding a total of five bikes (high ceilings help and one was on the ground). In Singapore I have only one and have two bikes on the rack and one on the ground with the aluminum extrusion wrapped in open cell foam.

I don't have a need for a free standing arrangement so prefer the expander setup. Setup takes about 15 minutes, including arranging the hooks at the right heights and I only take it down when I move. Landlord's also like it due to the non-invasive nature of the setup. I've used the current one now for about eleven years so on a cost basis, it's averaged down to some pretty small numbers.


CougarTrek said:
My vote is neither, instead this:

http://www.amazon.com/Gear-Floor-Ce...=UTF8&s=sporting-goods&qid=1285107178&sr=1-95

Compression mount, zero wobble (even when I hit the bike tires with the door or the dog runs into it). Holds up to 4 bikes rather than 2 (though you do have to buy another set of hooks, holds 2 as it ships). And it's completely adjustable so it doesn't matter how odd your top tube is, or how small your bike is you can make them hang straight and space them as you wish.

I have the wood version and would absolutely buy it again. I can't bring myself to trust the free-standing or leaning ones.
 

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IcecreamLtDan said:
Nice looking setup there, but the OP mentioned living in an apartment. As such I assume drilling holes in the wall is a no-no and I imagine a compression type stand would also damage the ceiling/floor, at least in my experience with such devices, they have at the very least left marks on the ceiling and floor where the ends touched and were tightened down to provide the hold needed to keep the device upright. If the OP doesn't have any problems with drilling holes or any worries about marks left by compression type stands, then ignore my post, which will probably happen anyway, but eh.
Like the OP, I do live in an apartment.

Hanging bikes in an apartment is no different than putting up pictures or shelves on the wall. I've always asked, and never had a problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks for the great feedback. I looked at all the suggested racks starting with the ones posted by BruceW and also considered the compression stand Cougar linked up. I was leaning towards the compression stand until I read that some people (looked like the minority) had issues setting it up and it occasionally would fall after losing suction...plus I didn't want to put a mark/indentation in the roof of my apartment and I also want to avoid holes in the wall (you nailed icecreamltdan and I read your post, lol)...so I started checking out stand alone units.

Skyliner, what places the topeak on 'another level'?
 

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It doesn't use suction

The top square has a rubber pad. Once you set the approximate length, you tighten down the two sliding pieces within the middle section with allen bolts. You then move the rack upright. The bottom piece has two metal feet which have threaded bolts that go into the lower piece. You slowly loosen the bolts/feet to where the top piece does not slide around the ceiling. At that point, using a bubble level to make sure that the rack is vertical in both axes. Once achieved, continue to loosen the bolts which compresses the rack betweent the floor and the ceiling. If you have a wallboard type ceiling, you'll need to find the joist location for where the ceiling pad goes.

I've attached a couple of pics. Obviously, I haven't washed the ceiling as the scuff marks will clean right up and the floor area is covered by the foam pad and clearly the cleaning person has not been there in some time.

Specinvstr said:
Thanks for the great feedback. I looked at all the suggested racks starting with the ones posted by BruceW and also considered the compression stand Cougar linked up. I was leaning towards the compression stand until I read that some people (looked like the minority) had issues setting it up and it occasionally would fall after losing suction...plus I didn't want to put a mark/indentation in the roof of my apartment and I also want to avoid holes in the wall (you nailed icecreamltdan and I read your post, lol)...so I started checking out stand alone units.

Skyliner, what places the topeak on 'another level'?
 
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