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Is it just me or is there a correlation between training miles and appetite?
I'm not talking harmless, socially acceptable hunger, but the kind that
causes co-workers to gasp and look at you askance. I just stooped to
rummaging through the office kitchen cabinet drawers for an old pack of
saltines, which I secreted back to my desk and devoured.
What I want, what I desperately need, is a bucket of scrambled eggs, not a caraffe
or a bowl. HR will have to 'talk me down' after I am found hip-deep in the dumpster
clawing through the garbage in search of edible substances.
 

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Banned forever.....or not
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All the time, after every hard ride.
When I get home, it shower, dinner, snack, snack again, and after that I spend 5 minutes with the refrigerator door open, looking for something to eat.
 

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I hear ya. The best adjective to describe my eating habits when I get home every evening is 'graze'. Needless to say, it ain't pretty. When I'm really hungry I end up eating peanut butter and maple syrup sandwiches followed by Nutella with a serving spoon. Then I feel ill for ther rest of the evening.
 

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Well, there's two kinds of energy consumption.

Aerobic burns fat, and glucose, from whatever you're taking in... energy bars and whatnot. High rate of spin, high heart rate, that's what gets consumed. Glucose.

Anaerobic (sprinting, hills, anything where you're pushing, and not spinning, or not just spinning) burns glycogen... which is sugar that's been processed, and then it gets stored in your muscles. It HAS to be replenished, and it takes a lot longer to replace, for biological reasons which elude me. Mostly, it happens when you're at rest, you're not using those muscles, and the body has time to restock the shelves.

The brain, among other things, runs on glycogen. And when it's gone, it's gone. Anyone who has ever bonked/hit the wall knows what it's like when the gas tank for the brain runs dry. You get dizzy, your balance gets thrown, it's hard to think straight, and all you want to do is sit down until it passes... it's not pretty. So, when you deplete glycogen stores, your body knows it. And it gets hungry.



Peanut butter and maple syrup, and nutella? Wow... sounds like a very special form of heaven. :)
 

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disgruntled pigskin fan
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uber-stupid said:
Well, there's two kinds of energy consumption.

Aerobic burns fat, and glucose, from whatever you're taking in... energy bars and whatnot. High rate of spin, high heart rate, that's what gets consumed. Glucose.

Anaerobic (sprinting, hills, anything where you're pushing, and not spinning, or not just spinning) burns glycogen... which is sugar that's been processed, and then it gets stored in your muscles. It HAS to be replenished, and it takes a lot longer to replace, for biological reasons which elude me. Mostly, it happens when you're at rest, you're not using those muscles, and the body has time to restock the shelves.

The brain, among other things, runs on glycogen. And when it's gone, it's gone. Anyone who has ever bonked/hit the wall knows what it's like when the gas tank for the brain runs dry. You get dizzy, your balance gets thrown, it's hard to think straight, and all you want to do is sit down until it passes... it's not pretty. So, when you deplete glycogen stores, your body knows it. And it gets hungry.



Peanut butter and maple syrup, and nutella? Wow... sounds like a very special form of heaven. :)
Not quite. If this were the case you would cease up and die once you bonked. The CNS metabolizes glucose, and glucose only. While the body prefers to make glucose (a monomer) from glycogen (a polymer of glucose monomers),glucose can also be derived from fats and amino acids via the liver to ensure your brain gets the glucose it needs long after you deplete your glycogen stores.
 

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Isn't that the truth, hard to "fill up" and then when you do......it's too late and you have a bad belly. (or at least I do)

I love the sneaking of the stale saltines, I so would do that. Saltines are great any which way.
 

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uber-stupid said:
Well, there's two kinds of energy consumption.

Aerobic burns fat, and glucose, from whatever you're taking in... energy bars and whatnot. High rate of spin, high heart rate, that's what gets consumed. Glucose.

Anaerobic (sprinting, hills, anything where you're pushing, and not spinning, or not just spinning) burns glycogen... which is sugar that's been processed, and then it gets stored in your muscles. It HAS to be replenished, and it takes a lot longer to replace, for biological reasons which elude me. Mostly, it happens when you're at rest, you're not using those muscles, and the body has time to restock the shelves.

The brain, among other things, runs on glycogen. And when it's gone, it's gone. Anyone who has ever bonked/hit the wall knows what it's like when the gas tank for the brain runs dry. You get dizzy, your balance gets thrown, it's hard to think straight, and all you want to do is sit down until it passes... it's not pretty. So, when you deplete glycogen stores, your body knows it. And it gets hungry.



Peanut butter and maple syrup, and nutella? Wow... sounds like a very special form of heaven. :)
Close but not quite right. Actually aerobic and anaerobic refer to the fueling of muscle contractions. In a sense, instead of refrring to energy consumption as you suggest, the terms refer to how the energy is produced - i.e. energy production.
This is a quote from myfooddiary.com:
"Strictly speaking, the terms "aerobic" and "anaerobic" refer to the presence and absence of oxygen, respectively. Most of our cells prefer to get their energy by using oxygen to fuel metabolism. During exercise with adequate fuel and oxygen (i.e., aerobic), muscle cells can contract repeatedly without fatigue. During anaerobic or non-oxygen conditions (i.e., higher intensity exercise), muscle cells must rely on other reactions that do not require oxygen to fuel muscle contraction. This anaerobic metabolism in the cells produces waste molecules that can impair muscle contractions. We call this deterioration in performance fatigue. ......
The problem with the terms "aerobic" and "anaerobic" when applied to exercise is that we actually never switch from total aerobic to total anaerobic metabolic conditions. In reality, the more intensely we exercise, the greater the need for anaerobic energy production. Consequently, it is best to view the terms aerobic and anaerobic as transitions in metabolism, where the proportion between aerobic and anaerobic metabolism changes depending on exercise intensity."
 

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HA! I knew if I talked out of my ass I'd get called on it. I read up on this months ago in the Forester book, and forgot some of the details.

I do remember reading that glycogen is the body's way of storing sugar though, and that it will use that when it's forced into anaerobic exercise mode. I am aware of the difference between aerobic and anaerobic exercise... I used to do a lot of weight lifting, which is, of course, an anaerobic exercise. Makes sense to me that bigger muscles would store more glycogen, since they'd need access to more of it. It also makes sense to me that during hills, or sprints, or other parts of a ride, that the activity is partly aerobic, due to the nature of the activity, but that for brief periods of heavy exertion, the sugar usage goes up, but the oxygen intake remains roughly the same, increasing the amount of anaerobic activity. But I'd forgotten about the glycogen to glucose transformation.

The short of it, though, is that a training ride would still cause massive depletion to the body's available stores of sugar. So the body (and again, please correct me if I'm off base) is basically reliant on outside sources of GLUCOSE :) until the glycogen stores are restored, which normally happens during a rest period.
 

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I feel hungry after a ride and I'm usually starving at breakfast. I don't eat too much on a ride itself, because it upsets my stomach. A good friend I ride with a few times per week, can't go far without eating. If he goes 25 mi. without food, he starts looking for road kill.
 
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