Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
164 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am specifically referring to MicroShift.

I'm a novice at wrenching. I've assembled my single speed from Bikes Direct, replaced cassette and chain, adjusted rear der., etc...

I decided to replace the tri bars on my Fuji with drop bars (please don't reply with geometry/handling concerns). I took care of the housings and ran the cables. The last cable was the front der. I had it on and tightened. I second guessed myself and re-tightened with my Park Tool cable stretcher and frayed the cable. I used the tool on the brakes and rear der with no issues. I was able to tighten the front der. cable but now there is about an inch of frayed wire sticking out. I would rather buy a new cable and make sure it's good before I wrap the bars. Hence why I'm looking to purchase shift cables.

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,726 Posts
II second guessed myself and re-tightened with my Park Tool cable stretcher and frayed the cable. I used the tool on the brakes and rear der with no issues. I was able to tighten the front der. cable but now there is about an inch of frayed wire sticking out. I would rather buy a new cable and make sure it's good before I wrap the bars. Hence why I'm looking to purchase shift cables.
You're not the least bit clear about where this frayed portion of the cable is but if it is at the end (after the cable clamp) then it is not a serious problem. You might even be able to twist it back to smooth and then either apply super glue, solder, or a cable cap to hold everything together.

As far as cables being different quality, yes they are. Some are not even stainless steel and so corrode easily. While there are a bunch of fans of various after-market cables, experience teaches that you won't go wrong with cable brands that match the brands of your components.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
164 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Here's a pic of the situation.

The reason I asked is I don't know if the cable end that goes into the shifter is universal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,726 Posts
Here's a pic of the situation.

The reason I asked is I don't know if the cable end that goes into the shifter is universal.
The cable ends need to be compatible - Campy and Shimano are different but I think that Shimano and SRAM are the same (head size is just enough different that you will jam it and not be able to get it out if you have the wrong one).

If it were me I would try to twist that cable back into as close as possible to a unified end and then super glue it or put a cable cap on it. Then I would buy a spare cable because you might have difficulties the next time you remove it from the derailleur.
 

·
Resident Curmudgeon
Joined
·
11,981 Posts
I'd put a new cable on there. To me, that looks like the frayed part is too close to the cable clamp. If you can twist that so you can put a cable cap on it my hat's off to you. Replace it. It's only a couple of bucks.
 

·
'brifter' is f'ing stupid
Joined
·
15,670 Posts
replace it, it's cheap. and stop using the silly third hand (cable stretcher) thing. i can't remember the last time i used that tool. or...don't cut the cable before you get it adjusted properly, then it won't fray.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
164 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I cut the cable after it frayed. I had no choice.

I have officially given up on the cable stretcher.

I wanna get a new cable that's why I'm asking if the cables are the same. I've been looking for MicroShift cables online and can't seem to find any.
 

·
'brifter' is f'ing stupid
Joined
·
15,670 Posts
the ONLY difference that matters is Campy shifters need Campy compatible cables. you can use Shimano and SRAM and any other cable interchangeably w/ ANY shifter as long as it's not Campy.
why aren't you just going to a local shop and buying a cable for $3.00? oddly enough they can also answer questions about compatibility right then and there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
164 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
the ONLY difference that matters is Campy shifters need Campy compatible cables. you can use Shimano and SRAM and any other cable interchangeably w/ ANY shifter as long as it's not Campy.
why aren't you just going to a local shop and buying a cable for $3.00? oddly enough they can also answer questions about compatibility right then and there.
I wish I had that kind of time. I work and I'm in school and have had exams for the past two weeks. I've been working on this overnight in between studying and sleeping. I have a short reprieve between exams this week so I'll stop by a shop. Thanks to everyone for their helpful responses.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
444 Posts
...stop using the silly third hand (cable stretcher) thing...I can't remember the last time i used that tool. or...don't cut the cable before you get it adjusted properly, then it won't fray.
First of all, it's a "fourth hand" (Not a 'third hand'); second, I've been using a very nice DiaCompe fourth hand tool for over 30 years in a shop environment - it's elegant in its simplicity and its performance is without equal (All others are cumbersome and gimmicky, especially the rachet feature); and third, I don't use it all the time, unless I'm installing zip-ties, but there are lots of times when it's a must and a real time saver (The right tool for the job).

But as has been said the key is to start off right by ensuring the shifter is in the smallest cog/chainring, leaving a bunch of cable exposed past the clamp (At least 12"), ensuring the cable is seated in the groove, not over tightening the bolt, pulling on the cable, and then re-tensioning the cable before cutting it off and installing the cap.
 

·
'brifter' is f'ing stupid
Joined
·
15,670 Posts
First of all, it's a "fourth hand" (Not a 'third hand'); second, I've been using a very nice DiaCompe fourth hand tool for over 30 years in a shop environment - it's elegant in its simplicity and its performance is without equal (All others are cumbersome and gimmicky, especially the rachet feature); and third, I don't use it all the time, unless I'm installing zip-ties, but there are lots of times when it's a must and a real time saver (The right tool for the job).

But as has been said the key is to start off right by ensuring the shifter is in the smallest cog/chainring, leaving a bunch of cable exposed past the clamp (At least 12"), ensuring the cable is seated in the groove, not over tightening the bolt, pulling on the cable, and then re-tensioning the cable before cutting it off and installing the cap.
i don't remember ever mentioning zip-ties. you can use the tool for whatever you want, i'm just saying it's not necessary to pull cables using it. there are other ways to get cables tight, which after 30 years i'm sure you're familiar with.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,273 Posts
I needed a cable in a hurry, and only Canadian Tire was open, so $3.49 later, I had a shifter cable that looked and worked in every respect exactly the same as the OEM 'Shimano'. This time, I cut it plenty long so I could grip it with pliers to set starting tension, and if it ever frayed, it was far enough away that I could trim away the frayed part, and have lots left over. It's been working really well.

So no, it doesn't matter, make it easy on yourself, grab another cable from anywhere.
 

·
'brifter' is f'ing stupid
Joined
·
15,670 Posts
I needed a cable in a hurry, and only Canadian Tire was open, so $3.49 later, I had a shifter cable that looked and worked in every respect exactly the same as the OEM 'Shimano'. This time, I cut it plenty long so I could grip it with pliers to set starting tension, and if it ever frayed, it was far enough away that I could trim away the frayed part, and have lots left over. It's been working really well.

So no, it doesn't matter, make it easy on yourself, grab another cable from anywhere.
why are you cutting the cable before you get everything working properly and why are you using pliers?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
164 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Before and during this process I was searching on YouTube for how to videos. Mostly they were not all inclusive. It wasn't until after my cable stretch fiasco did I come across this video. I wish I would have found this earlier.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
444 Posts
"fourth hand" (Not a 'third hand'); I don't use it all the time, unless I'm installing zip-ties, but there are lots of times when it's a must and a real time saver.
Excellent. Now you've learned it's a "fourth hand tool" (And you said you couldn't remember the last time you used one so that suggests you don't use it for zip-ties either. Wherein I use the tool for its intended purpose and in addition mentioned as an aside that I use it to install zip-ties).

Of course there are lots of ways to tension a cable, which you're also learning. And that's the point. We all figure out ways to do stuff that works for us and, Kerry Irons, what's "funny' about that?
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top