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I rode last winter with 700-25mm and they were a bit scary when things got a little icy. I was wondering how much better cross tires would be? I have enough room for about a 35mm ...I ended up riding my old mountain bike ...it felt more inspiring. I really don't want to buy another maountain bike or any other bike for that matter. So I would really be happy for any help


One last thing what would you think about running a larger tire up front? I have way more room
 

· Number 2 on the course.
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I rode 25Cs through the first few snowy weeks last winter. Eventually I had a few comical interactions with ice and switched to 32C Ritchey SpeedMax front and rear. They got me through the rest of winter riding carefully, and far exceeded my expectations when I wasn't so careful.
 

· More Cowbell!
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I rode through snow and slush with cross tires. They worked pretty well. However, we had some snow -- which melted some -- then refroze as ice. Then it snowed again. Nothing short of studded tires are going to help you in that situation.

I hit a big ice patch on a slight rise. I knew that if I turned, I was going down. I knew if I put any power to the pedals, I was going down. And I probably wasn't going to be able to stand up if I just came to a stop. I tried to be steady on the pedals -- and I went down. Then I kind of crawled off the ice dragging my bike.

Good think I was only a couple blocks from home.
 

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Tire size will make no difference if there is ice. I have 42's on my cross bike, and they did not help me one bit when I hit a patch of black ice last winter. Fortunately I was going pretty slow up a climb, but it was hard walking off of the stuff to get to my bike.

If any of the car wisdom holds true for bicycles, then you would probably want something on the narrow side to cut through when riding in snowy conditions.

I will say that the roads themselves deteriorate in the winter where I live so inevitably you end up riding across some ugly pavement. Also if you are on your bike in the dark it is easy to hit the little asphalt divots that would probably result in a puncture.

I would probably go with something around a 30 if I were you. For 90% of your commuting they are going to roll faster. Just stay home when the roads are covered with winter precipitation.
 

· ab aeterno
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I ride on Nokian Hakkapeliitta during the winter. Get a studded tire if you're worried about ice. If you can afford two tires get two but if you're cheap then just get one, but odds are you'll get a second one sooner or later.
 

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Big Baby Jesus said:
If any of the car wisdom holds true for bicycles, then you would probably want something on the narrow side to cut through when riding in snowy conditions.
It doesn't IME. Bikes are much lighter than cars, for one thing. Moreover, cutting through the snow may land you on the ice underneath the snow. Better packed snow than ice.

Big Baby Jesus said:
I will say that the roads themselves deteriorate in the winter where I live so inevitably you end up riding across some ugly pavement. Also if you are on your bike in the dark it is easy to hit the little asphalt divots that would probably result in a puncture.
This is another reason to go for bigger tires.

Big Baby Jesus said:
I would probably go with something around a 30 if I were you. For 90% of your commuting they are going to roll faster. Just stay home when the roads are covered with winter precipitation.
When it is snowy and icy, rolling faster is a lesser priority than staying upright.
 

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I ride all through the winter, and in Canada no less.

I have run spiked tires, and on ice they are magic. I ran 25mm Marathon plus last winter. They were great. But there was very little ice on the roads. Lots of compact snow. I find thinner tires that cut through the snow are much better for me.

If you are serious about commuting through the winter, and your terrain has ice, then put spiked tires on in November and take them off in May.
 
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