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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had a Ti frame built...double butted, 2 lbs, 13 oz. . Details later! But here's the question...I have have had other Ti frames. This one seems "slower". Not as spirited when climbing. I am 'pushing' this bike up hills, rather than it 'pulling' me, as other frames have...if you get my drift.
What causes a frame to be 'slower'? Is there anyway to tell, before riding, if a frame is quick and 'spirited'?
 

· 100% torqued
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I say no. You use quotes which makes me think you agree. What components are on the frame? What did you eat before the ride? It is a feeling not a quantative measure you describe, I tend to believe a bike is a bike is a bike, it is the motor that really makes a difference. You also say it seems slower, were you actually slower? Give it time, and get used to it.
 

· What the Hell is going on
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Check your tires?

I've got a similar problem with my steel bikes. I had a side wall failure on my favorite Paramount while on a ride. Luckily I was near a bike store. I purchased the cheapest clincher they had just to get me home. Then on my Saturday club ride I noticed that my bike felt like I was riding in sand. I changed the rear tire to my regular tire and . . . Voila! I'm still slow but it feels faster!
 

· eminence grease
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AlanS said:
I had a Ti frame built...double butted, 2 lbs, 13 oz. . Details later! But here's the question...I have have had other Ti frames. This one seems "slower". Not as spirited when climbing. I am 'pushing' this bike up hills, rather than it 'pulling' me, as other frames have...if you get my drift.
What causes a frame to be 'slower'? Is there anyway to tell, before riding, if a frame is quick and 'spirited'?
Not in my experience. Any time I feel like I'm pedaling in yogurt it's always me. It's happened on every bike I own at one time or another which tells me the equipment is not to be blamed. Same in the other direction, at one time or another I've felt like I was flying on everything I've ridden.

Give it 15 or 20 rides before you conclude it's "slow."
 

· The Gimlet Eye
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terry b said:
Any time I feel like I'm pedaling in yogurt it's always me.
It happens to me from time to time. On some rides I'm stopping constantly to check my brakes to make sure they're not rubbing or my tires aren't too low. Something must be causing my sluggishness. It's the bike...yeah, that's the ticket :thumbsup:
 

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Do you have a watch?

AlanS said:
I had a Ti frame built...double butted, 2 lbs, 13 oz. . Details later! But here's the question...I have have had other Ti frames. This one seems "slower". Not as spirited when climbing. I am 'pushing' this bike up hills, rather than it 'pulling' me, as other frames have...if you get my drift.
What causes a frame to be 'slower'? Is there anyway to tell, before riding, if a frame is quick and 'spirited'?
Seems slower? There is this proven technology, where you repeatedly time yourself over a given course, and compare your times with a given bike/wheels/diet/training program, etc. Try it, you might learn about your "slow bike."
 

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Is your position on the new bike the same as on the old bikes? Even a small difference in position can make for a noticeably different feel. Remember that different models of seats have you sitting differently-- they may sag more or less under your weight, or encourage you to slide back more or less on climbs.
 

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I agree with all previous comments.

But I will say I think it could also be a slow bike because of the way you ride the bike. You have not found a comfortable stance to ride the bike. When you do find your position then the bike won't be slow (unless you make it with your legs). Whenever I change things on my bike I either adapt to them and love them or don't adapt and change it back. Does this make sense?
 

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these things you check for make me slow all the time, but the worst is when i am convinced the bottom bracket is seizing up...

seriously, to the OP i would look at your position on you "fast bike" and make comparisons of the relevent measurements, then duplicate them on the slow bike.



covenant said:
It happens to me from time to time. On some rides I'm stopping constantly to check my brakes to make sure they're not rubbing or my tires aren't too low. Something must be causing my sluggishness. It's the bike...yeah, that's the ticket :thumbsup:
 

· The Wanderer
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covenant said:
It happens to me from time to time. On some rides I'm stopping constantly to check my brakes to make sure they're not rubbing or my tires aren't too low. Something must be causing my sluggishness. It's the bike...yeah, that's the ticket :thumbsup:
All along I thought I was the only one who did this...:) Sometimes it seems as if somebody is holding on to the back of my bike...I even remember going to a mechanic once to have him check my brakes, BB and hubs. In the end, the bike was perfect. HMMM, I wonder what it could be...?

(Hint: Rhymes with eggs and begins with an L...:D)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
BUT...I have heard riders say that some bikes are 'noodley', "not stiff", "quicker". If the above posts are correct, then (assuming geomentry is the same) all bikes are created equal (except for weight) ? I remember having an old C-dale that was so stiff... when I pushed that pedal, it went! Of course, I was 15 years younger (55, now).
 

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"Lively feel"

I think there is something to the notion that a bike might "feel" faster or slower but I think it depends on the individual riding it. You might be used to a stiffer ride and thus, when riding a frame with a slightly plusher ride, don't "feel" as though the bike is going as fast even if it is. All the steel frame devotees will wax poetically about the "lively feel" of steel. It all depends on your frame of reference.
 

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I had a De Rosa Giro (steel frame) bike that was a beauty to look at, but felt absolutely dead when ridden. It had no snap and felt particularly unresponsive in the rear triangle.

On the other hand, my Richard Sachs frame is a true joy to ride. It's super-responsive without being twitchy and is up to any task I can throw at it. If you ask e-Richie what the angles are, he'll tell you "they're the right ones." You know what, he's 100% correct.
 

· Devoid of all flim-flam
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Alan, I know what you're talking about even if I can't explain the voodoo. Whether it is purely psychologial, a position issue, or an actual physical/mechanical element, I've found some bikes to be like a recalcitrant nag (the type that turn around and try to bite you when you give them a kick) and others like wild-eyed thoroughbreds. Speaking of nags, my old aluminum Colnago Dream was especially frisky. Whenever it saw a climb, it just preternaturally had to follow it.
 
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