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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I'm rebuilding a set of Easton EA70 wheels that I got at an REI Garage sale. They were returned because the "spokes came loose", which I've seen here and there on reviews for this set. I have brand new spokes that I'm going to replace all the existing ones on, but I've noticed something odd: it looks like all the spokes were laced "backwards" (flipped?)! When I look at the holes to see which one is offset toward one side of the hub, it looks like they are going to the wrong side.

Composite material Thumb Aluminium Steel Plywood

In this photo, the spoke hole by my hand is clearly offset toward the right, but the reality was that the spoke was laced to the left. If I'm reading my Roger Musson book correctly, it shows me clearly that if I was lacing this from scratch, that spoke should go toward the right.

Could they have gotten this completely wrong at the factory? I looked at the rear wheel and it shows the same "backwards/flipped" lacing. Is there any reason to keep it that way, or should I pull off everything and lace those spokes toward the way they are supposed to be?

Thanks for your help.
 

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A wheelist
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The spoke in the rim bed hole closest to the right side of the rimtape bed goes to the left side of the hub. Nipple holes (I'm talking nipple bed ones not tape bed ones) are usually offset (some very slightly) and also angled towards the side of the hub at which they're aimed.

So your wheels are correct.
 

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Hi all,

In this photo, the spoke hole by my hand is clearly offset toward the right, but the reality was that the spoke was laced to the left. If I'm reading my Roger Musson book correctly, it shows me clearly that if I was lacing this from scratch, that spoke should go toward the right.
From the book:
"On some rims the spoke holes are drilled at an angle to allow a natural spoke line between the rim and hub, this is also known as directional drilling and is common on carbon fibre rims and others where the rim profile has a V section.

On these rims it is not advisable to look into the rim channel from the outside because the stagger may appear on the opposite side to which it actually is."​
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks Mike, as always, for sorting out my understanding of which side to look at the rim holes.

And clearly, Roger, I was reading your book incorrectly. Thanks so much for your book and for helping me see that I was looking at it from the wrong side!!

Onward to the rebuild.
 

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A wheelist
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Thanks Mike, as always, for sorting out my understanding of which side to look at the rim holes.

And clearly, Roger, I was reading your book incorrectly. Thanks so much for your book and for helping me see that I was looking at it from the wrong side!!

Onward to the rebuild.
On some rims it isn't easy to see. I've taken a digital caliper to some rims in the past.
 
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