Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Are titanium skewers safe?

I have recently heard of them breaking during hard efforts such as sprints or out of the saddle climbing. It would be a major bummer to have skewer break during a sprint. yikes!

I have a couple of 4 year old Ti skewers that I was using with my zipps but now with a new frame etc am a bit concerned.

Fwiw I also do more crits than RR's though I haven't raced much the last 2 years.
 

·
C 1/5
Joined
·
613 Posts
I've been using USE Alien Ti skewers for almost 3 years with no ill effect (almost 15,000 miles in that time). I've "bunny hopped" holes, curbs, and some snakes as avoidance measures with them on, and I've had no problems.

For background: I weigh about 155 lbs, and am a pretty smooth rider - and they've held up well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,831 Posts
Relatively safe

hardride27 said:
Are titanium skewers safe? I have recently heard of them breaking during hard efforts such as sprints or out of the saddle climbing. It would be a major bummer to have skewer break during a sprint. yikes!
You hear all kinds of stories, about all kinds of failures, but the question is whether they are true and if they are true, how freqently they really happen. In fact, many of the stories we hear are either not true or are a single/small number of incidents told over and over again such that it seems like it's common. Ti skewers are often a problem in that they can't apply adequate clamping force for rear wheels to prevent the wheel moving in the frame. As a result, people may tend to over-tighten them. If you think about it rationally, there's not much additional force on a QR skewer coming from your pedalling hard or standing up. Ti skewers are not a real good idea, but they're not some kind of massive safety hazard either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
maybe not enough clamping force - not breaking

Perhaps that is what I heard, they do not apply as much clamping force vs they were breaking.

A friend sprinting at the finish of a race had his rear wheel come out. He thought he had broken the skewer (and maybe it did then or in the ensuing crash) but it was a Ti skewer.

On a training ride we had someone off the front. One guy got out of the saddle to accelerate and start to bridge up and his rear wheeel came out. I was right behind him, scary stuff. I don't know if this was a Ti skewer but the above incident was Ti. So maybe it's not actual breaking of the skewer but it lacking enough clamping force to keep a rear wheel in place.
 

·
Banned forever.....or not
Joined
·
24,573 Posts
For myself, I wouldn't use them on a rear wheel, but they would be fine in front. For the rear, I will only use Shimano, or Campy skewers. None of those "Fancy" ones.
 

·
Old Skool
Joined
·
804 Posts
Why low clamping force for Ti?

What is it about Ti skewers that makes the clamping force they develop lower than that of a steel skewer? I would think that if the skewer was properly designed (more a question of the cam mechanism that anything else) it would develop the same clamping force as a steel skewer of similar design. If this is not the case, why not?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,831 Posts
Elongation

Stogaguy said:
What is it about Ti skewers that makes the clamping force they develop lower than that of a steel skewer?
It's not about the mechanism, it's about the higher elongation of the Ti skewer shaft itself. If you think about it, it doesn't take very much "stretch" of the skewer to significantly reduce the clamping force.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
129 Posts
Stogaguy said:
What is it about Ti skewers that makes the clamping force they develop lower than that of a steel skewer? I would think that if the skewer was properly designed (more a question of the cam mechanism that anything else) it would develop the same clamping force as a steel skewer of similar design. If this is not the case, why not?
I had the same question and thought that the extra flex would attribute to it but kerry irons theory makes sense too
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top