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soy un perdedor
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm no expert, but I assume this is what the Saiz scandal involves (they would be silly to be doing homologous transfusions like Hamilton). Cyclists are receiving their own red blood cells to boost hemocrit. I wonder if there is any way this can be controlled / detected. Will the UCI need to keep an continual log of everyone's hemocrit? Altitude tents are OK, but your own blood isn't (same result)? How can this ever be controlled?

I'm sure someone has better insight than me into the medical aspect of this. Anyone?
 

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from what I've heard

autologous blood transfusions still leave markers. the 'old blood' can be detected somehow. It was part of the new testing procedures that also improved the homologous testing.
 
G

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Hmm, I wonder if they use HbA1C tests, those who use ABT to dope would have abnormally low HbA1C levels since the centrifuged RBCs would have very little glucose to react with. I suspect that that the 'old' RBCs would tend to show up as an excess of 'new' RBCs - unless the process use to preserve the 'old' blood leaves some other telltale chemical marker.

Good question.
 
G

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Thinking about it and the about the number of specimens found - it's pretty apparent that someone has found a way to mask ABTs from whatever current test is used to dectect them.
 

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soy un perdedor
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I did some research

Looks like there is no test in place, but there are ways to detect it.

From Cyclingnews:

A test for autologous transfusion?
With the urinary test for EPO recently put into question after three triathletes were incorrectly identified as having taken cycling's perennial blood-boosting agent [see separate story: 'Serious concerns over urinary EPO test'], there's also the 'loophole' that exists with no approved test for autologous blood transfusion as yet - that is, the transfusion of one's own blood.

At the World Track Championships in Los Angeles, outgoing UCI president Hein Verbruggen indicated that the test to detect doping via autologous blood transfusion was almost complete. However, that was over nine months ago.

"Well, I know people are working on it... it's too soon to say how far they are having the validated test for autologous transfusion," said the UCI medical source. "I'm not involved as much in the development, so I don't know what stage they are at; what I know is that it doesn't exist, but that doesn't mean it couldn't exist in the near future."

While WADA's responsible for coordinating and in large part funding the development of the test, one would think the UCI would play an active role on the sidelines. But from the recent bickering over who leaked Lance Armstrong's doping control reports to French sports paper L'Equipe and the subsequent accusations made by WADA chief Dick Pound to Verbruggen, it's obvious that for time being at least, the UCI are resigned to the role of handing out oranges at half-time.

What is known is that the parameters are modified on a similar level, so the off scores and the reticulocytes behave in the same way, no matter what kind of transfusion occurs. "So when we see a high [off] score or very low reticulocytes, we don't know if it was due to a previous use of EPO, if it due to autologous transfusion, or if it was due to homologous transfusion," said the UCI source, "but we know it was due to blood doping.

"So what this means is that even though autologous transfusion cannot be detected by an anti-doping test, evidence of its use can be seen and the consequences can be already taken, like taking out the athlete from the race, or other measures."

And,

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=3596878&dopt=Abstract
 
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