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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, as some of you may know I have had some issues with my bikes current setup for bars and stem. First off they were to narrow at 42cm and second the stem was to long and had no rise. I had about a 4" drop from my seat to the tops of my bars. For me with my size it was to much and I felt like I was reaching to far with the 120mm carbon stem bar combo. (Cinelli Ram Jam Carbon Bar stem combo).

So I am in pursuit of a new bar Stem Combo. I picked up a Specialized Roubaix bar that is a 44cm and a Specialized stem that has a bunch of different cams of sort to give you various rises. The rise I will start with first is the largest one at 16 degrees... I wanted to get some input on a few things. Is there a correct angle for the bar to be installed at? What about brake hoods etc? Also how far up the stem should the fork tube come. From what I see I am probably close to an inch between the top of my stem and the for tube. This is more than the Cinelli stem, bar combo.... I haven't taped my bars yet because as I was cutting my cable's for my brakes I boogered up one of the cables because my wire cutter suck and wouldn't make a clean cut. I am going to have to replace the cable now. So with these photo's of before and after how to my angles as far as bar and hood look. Or is this all personal preference?

Before:



After: Now my Seat to top of Bar drop is only 2" and i have a shorter stem with a rise now...

 

· What the what???
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There may be some folks who give you hard time about the angled stem. Don't listen to them. It's your ride and what works for you that matters. You may find that once you tape your bars you may want to rotate them up slightly, or not.

I had a similar situation with my Speedster. I purchased a Ritchey adjustable stem to help me find the correct angle for me. Once I found it, I ended up with a 105mm 40 degree rise that put my bars basically level with my saddle height. It's not exactly aero...but then, neither am I :)
 

· Cycling induced anoesis
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lacofdfireman said:
Ok, as some of you may know I have had some issues with my bikes current setup for bars and stem. First off they were to narrow at 42cm and second the stem was to long and had no rise. I had about a 4" drop from my seat to the tops of my bars. For me with my size it was to much and I felt like I was reaching to far with the 120mm carbon stem bar combo. (Cinelli Ram Jam Carbon Bar stem combo).

So I am in pursuit of a new bar Stem Combo. I picked up a Specialized Roubaix bar that is a 44cm and a Specialized stem that has a bunch of different cams of sort to give you various rises. The rise I will start with first is the largest one at 16 degrees... I wanted to get some input on a few things. Is there a correct angle for the bar to be installed at? What about brake hoods etc? Also how far up the stem should the fork tube come. From what I see I am probably close to an inch between the top of my stem and the for tube. This is more than the Cinelli stem, bar combo.... I haven't taped my bars yet because as I was cutting my cable's for my brakes I boogered up one of the cables because my wire cutter suck and wouldn't make a clean cut. I am going to have to replace the cable now. So with these photo's of before and after how to my angles as far as bar and hood look. Or is this all personal preference?
If I'm reading the bolded statement correctly, you have to stop where you are because the bike will be unsafe to ride.

Between the top of stem (where the top cap sits) and the top edge of the steerer tube, there needs to be a 2-3mm gap, with the stem being the higher of the two. If the steerer tube is about an inch lower, that doesn't allow for the upper stem clamp to grasp the steerer tube and you run the risk of snapping the tube (usually at a most inopportune time).

If I've misunderstood, then to answer the second part of your question, bar position and shifter placement are, for the most part, personal preference. Before taping, I'd experiment with both keeping in mind that there are some compromises depending on placement.
 

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ideally the steerer tube should be a little higher than the stem and a small spacer should go on top of the stem to give the clearance needed for the binder bolt to compress the fork/bearings. This provides a full clamping section for the stem. It sounds like your setup is dangerous if the steerer tube is one inch shorter than the top of the stem. Do not ride it like that!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thought I better take some photo's and show you what I have before I try and ride it and mess something up or maybe even hurt myself. Here is what it looks like. The fork tube is just barely under the top most pinch bolt of the stem. So am I safe or is this not gonna work?






 

· Cycling induced anoesis
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stevesbike said:
ideally the steerer tube should be a little higher than the stem and a small spacer should go on top of the stem to give the clearance needed for the binder bolt to compress the fork/bearings. This provides a full clamping section for the stem. It sounds like your setup is dangerous if the steerer tube is one inch shorter than the top of the stem. Do not ride it like that!
The OP is using a Specialized stem. Spacers are NOT recommended above of the stem.
 

· turtle killer.
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Correct, but it still looks like not enough engagement on the steerer tube. I'm wondering if there was that much of a gap with the 'stock' stem.. even accounting for the ~3mm of spacer the specialized shims really add...
 

· Cycling induced anoesis
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The only way you can safely install that stem is to use a smaller conical spacer below it, which will (effectively) move the top of steerer tube where it needs to be - which may defeat your purpose (of raising the bars).

As is, this won't work and is dangerous to ride.
 

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dysfunction said:
Correct, but it still looks like not enough engagement on the steerer tube. I'm wondering if there was that much of a gap with the 'stock' stem.. even accounting for the ~3mm of spacer the specialized shims really add...
No question, the install as is is dangerous.

IME the Spec shims add no additional stack height.

EDIT: To clarify the latter statement: The shim width is accounted for, so the total height of a Spec stem w/ shim matches that of several other brands.
 

· Hucken The Fard Up !
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that frame is too small for you
 

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The frame is not too small. The problem is the too short steerer tube. The removal of the bottom spacer doesn't look like it will yield the proper connection either. Might be time for a new uncut fork.
 

· n00bsauce
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Exactly how much is the top of the steerer below the top of the stem (measure in millimeters).
 

· What the what???
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lacofdfireman said:
The fork tube is just barely under the top most pinch bolt of the stem. So am I safe or is this not gonna work?






+1. Do not ride the bike if the steerer tube is below the top stem bolt. The stem won't have enough clamping force to hold securely.

As others have said, you basically have three options

A shorter conical spacer
A longer steerer tube
A new stem with a shorter clamp

The spacer will be the least expensive option. Don't ride it as it is, though.
 

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I would say that the OP would be batter served to ride a bike with a longer head tube, or alas, a larger bike. You can put a new fork on this bike but he will need to put too many spacers on it, which could fall outside the fork manufacture's recommendation.

BTW, OP, you might have been able to flop your old stem instead of buying a new one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
raymonda said:
I would say that the OP would be batter served to ride a bike with a longer head tube, or alas, a larger bike. You can put a new fork on this bike but he will need to put too many spacers on it, which could fall outside the fork manufacture's recommendation.

BTW, OP, you might have been able to flop your old stem instead of buying a new one.

That would look silly considering the Stem and Handlebar are one piece carbon...

I will be ordering me a new custom bike next week... Going to give Carl Strong a call in the morning.. I think as some have told me on here, I can make this bike work but it will never be the right size for me and the style of riding I want to do.. This bike would be great if I was a USCF racer or something but that is not my intentions... I appreciate all the help I have had with this..
 

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lacofdfireman said:
I will be ordering me a new custom bike next week... Going to give Carl Strong a call in the morning.. I think as some have told me on here, I can make this bike work but it will never be the right size for me and the style of riding I want to do.. This bike would be great if I was a USCF racer or something but that is not my intentions... I appreciate all the help I have had with this..
I'm guessing that it'll take quite a while before a custom bike can be made for you. Why don't you finish off the stem/handlebar mod on the Scott and then ride that through the summer? As others have said you can replace the conical carbon spacer. Another possibility would be to cut the spacer down to size. The LBS can fix this for you. You could even get a professional fit on this bike to get it dialled in before deciding on the geometry for your custom build. I found that getting the fit right on my first road bike was pivotal in making the right decisions for my second bike ...
 
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