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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I would like some opinions to my questions that follow this blurb, please...

We'll, now that I finally have a road worthy bike, I set out and did my first 5+ mile ride in over 10 years. For some background, I am a 6'7" ex-college athlete (15 yrs ago), who is now 275 pounds and needs to lose weight and get back in shape. I smoked for a couple of years out of college, but haven't in years.

My intention is to ride 3 days a week during my lunch at work, plus some additional time outside of work hours.

So, today I think I set my baseline, on my first 5+ mile ride:

16.46 miles
1 hour and 8 minutes
30mph max speed
14.3mph average speed
101rpm max cadence
58rpm average cadence

What do you think are reasonable goals to get me going in the right direction? Assume that I have 1 hour to ride, 3 times a week. and don't forget I am new to cycling and way out of shape....

As a beginner, with a lot weight to move...

What average cadence should I be shooting for?
What average speed should I be shooting for?
What should I be shooting for, in total time, doing the same 16.46 mile route?
What should I eat from the cafeteria after riding for lunch?

Here is my bike:




 

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Just my thoughts(I am sure there will be at least 5 others in this thread that say the same)don't focus on average speed.Huge mistake.That is no way to guage your fitness and there are too many variables(heat,wind,hydration etc)to take that measure seriously.

With that said,I'd say focus on getting your cadence up a bit and having fun.I don't know how much an effort this baseline ride of yours was but shooting for a cadence in the 70's would be a goal to shoot for for now and would probably be an easy goal to obtain.Ultimately uppers 80's to 90's would be a good place to be.Just don't try to use the same gear you did in this base line.That might be too big of a gear.Downshift a few gears and find one you can "spin" that isn't so slack that you are bouncing around in the saddle.

Just remember to have fun with it.If your goal for now is to lose some weight and to gain fitness don't over-analize the small stuff.Just ride,have fun and ride some more.

BTW,Nice looking ride.:thumbsup:
 

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NeoRetroGrouch
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Agree, just ride and have fun.

If you are a numbers/routine junkie, start by going for 15 mph average. Then maybe see how far you can average 17.5 and keep lengthening that until it is the entire route. Don't do this every ride. Work on your cadence. Practice riding on the white line (don't look down at it; you can feel it.).

For food, you don't need anything additional for your current work out which will burn about 500 Cal. If you do that every day and don't eat any more than you have been, you will drop a pound/week.

TF
 

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I agree, work on your cadence. Pedal in circles. Work on riding smoothly and not wasting energy. It takes a long time to develop a smooth efficient pedal stroke, so don't be discouraged if you're not riding like Lance in a few months.

Learn how to take a bottle out of the cage, take a drink and put it back while riding. Then learn how to do it without looking. Once you are comfortable with your regular ride, do a different ride. Riding the same ride all the time gets old.

If you can get the time, do a longer ride on the weekends. Work up no more than 10% per week. The more you ride the more calories you burn. Once your rides are more than 1.5 hours or so, you'll be needing to consume some calories during the ride.

But remember, keep it fun.
 

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TurboTurtle said:
.......your current work out which will burn about 500 Cal. If you do that every day and don't eat any more than you have been, you will drop a pound/week.

TF
I don't know how accurate this calculator is, but according to it (at his weight and average speed) he's burning 1500 or more calories during his 68 minute lunchtime ride.

It may not mean anything, but it's a fun site.

http://www.primusweb.com/fitnesspartner/jumpsite/calculat.htm

Ian
 

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Bad data

hallin222 said:
I don't know how accurate this calculator is, but according to it (at his weight and average speed) he's burning 1500 or more calories during his 68 minute lunchtime ride.
Two words: total nonsense. We have no data about hills, but if this was ridden on the flats, even if the OP is at the low end of metabolic efficiency, he couldn't have burned much more than 600 calories. More likely less than 500. These calculators are notoriously innacurate, assuming couch potato metabolic efficiency and a beach cruiser with underinflated tires.
 

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Resident Curmudgeon
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Congrats on exercising & trying to better yourself. What you're doing can only help.

A word about cadence. It feels funny to pedal fast when you're a beginner. The tendency is to use big, (high), gears & pedal slowly. Despite how odd it may feel, spinning faster is actually easier. You'll need some time to develop a smooth, easy pedal stroke, but after a month or so of steady riding, you'll see what we're takling about. Shoot for around 70+ at first. See how that feels, then increase it to 80 or so, when you feel comfortable with it. Most racers and long-time experienced riders spin at about 88 rpm & up. Don't be intimidated by that. You're doing great, just as you are. Keep it up!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Quick update:

I'm only riding this same loop 2x sometimes 3x a week. But that should improve, I am just too busy at work at the moment. Or, maybe I become a 5AM rider. I am also getting a few miles in during the weekend towing my 2 year old daughter in her Trek GoBug behind my mtn bike around the neighborhood.

I am now riding my 16ish mile loop like this:
Time: 58-59 minutes
Avg Cadence: 77-81 rpm
Avg Speed: 16.4 mph

To me that is a nice improvement over my 1st couple of runs at it:
Time: 64-68 minutes
Avg Cadence: 58-63 rpm
Avg Speed: 14.3 mph

Can anyone list some pros and cons with towing my daughter behind my Trek 2100? I've been hesitant to swap out the rear skewer, and use it with her intow. I feel like the Trek 2100 is my work out bike. And my Gary Fisher Montare is my, have fun around the neighborhood with the daughter in tow bike...thoughts?
 

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ban youself from using your big chainring till you get to the point where an 80-100rpm cadence feels natural, you'll be absolutely amazed how much this helps you. I went from pushing bigger gears at 50-60 rpm like you're doing now to pushing slightly lower gears at around 100 rpm the difference just blew me away it was so much easier once I got used to it that it almost felt like I was cheating in someway.
 

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The Right Wing
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The MTB is fine for the trailer.

One note on loosing weight. Be carefull that cycling does not cause you to over-eat. Diet is a big factor in weight control (Obvious Man!). An hour on the bike may get you 500 deficit, but one Pop Tart and a can of Coke can slide down in about 90 seconds and cost you about 500 Calories. Which is easier, riding an hour, or skipping the snack? If you feel hungry, good, that is what loosing weight is about.
 

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fishrising said:
Quick update:

I'm only riding this same loop 2x sometimes 3x a week. But that should improve, I am just too busy at work at the moment. Or, maybe I become a 5AM rider. I am also getting a few miles in during the weekend towing my 2 year old daughter in her Trek GoBug behind my mtn bike around the neighborhood.

I am now riding my 16ish mile loop like this:
Time: 58-59 minutes
Avg Cadence: 77-81 rpm
Avg Speed: 16.4 mph

To me that is a nice improvement over my 1st couple of runs at it:
Time: 64-68 minutes
Avg Cadence: 58-63 rpm
Avg Speed: 14.3 mph

Can anyone list some pros and cons with towing my daughter behind my Trek 2100? I've been hesitant to swap out the rear skewer, and use it with her intow. I feel like the Trek 2100 is my work out bike. And my Gary Fisher Montare is my, have fun around the neighborhood with the daughter in tow bike...thoughts?
I use my road bike (cannondale) and my hybrid (kona) both for towing my daughter. both work great. I actually like her on my roadbike work out sometimes, towing her, and a good headwind, is a great workout. spend 4 days towing your daughter, then a rest day, then ride like the wind!

I never worried about average speed, I have intersections every block for the 1st, and last 10 miles of my ride, plus bike paths full of people/dogs/rodents.

What I focused on, was when I got roads where I dont have to stop, was watching my speed increase and my HR decrease. I use to push 85% my max and above to pedal at 18-20mph. Now I can maintain that speed and not go above 80%
 

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These are all great suggestions, and advice...

And your improvement is to be commended...

But as most of these suggestions say... HAVE FUN.
If it's not fun, you won't stay with it... and if you don't stay with it...
You won't loose the weight you want to... TRUST ME... I'm with ya, granted I only ever got up to about 235 lbs... But that was enough, and now I am back down to under 200 just this week...which is still WAY too much for my liking being only 5'10" or so.

I'd worry about getting faster, or stronger, or a better avg. speed, or doing more miles when I get to it....read my motto below...
 

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I am no Guide
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You may want to pick up a heart rate monitor to guag where you are training, and match your wight loss goals with and activity level with your HRM.

I have used cycling to loose, and now matian weight, I am now working on loosing more wight, but it seems to be getting harder because I am not being overly disapined in my eating habits.

Cycling is a great way to get healthy.

Good Luck,

A
 

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Like the other guys have said work on the cadence, and stay off the big chain ring. I started out on the big ring pushing a cadence around 60-70. The last 400 miles I have banned myself from the big ring and have been working on my spinning by periodically bursting to 100+ RPM for around a mile at a time. Now I'm averaging a cadence around 90-95 RPM over long distances (20+ miles) I'm going just as fast (actually faster) and its not near as fatiguing. Spinning will really help once you start climbing some hillls.
 

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Book Suggestion

You might want to purchase Chris Carmichael's, "The Ultimate Ride". It is a good source of training information.

Bike riding is not necessarily the best way to lose weight but is a great source of fitness and a good choice for someone your size because it is easy on the joints. You may want to try and get some walking in on the days that you do not bike.

My best friend is 6'2" and 240lbs. I would estimate his cadence at around 45-50 and he can ride long distances. He says that cycling cleared up all his knee problems. Do whatever feels natural.

Try and find someone to ride with. It is much more enjoyable.
 

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Lemur-ing
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I'm curious, you're 6"7? Wow. What size bike do you ride? Former college athlete? cool, what sport? Yeah work on cadence. About using the smaller chainring, well, do whatever feels best for you actually. to lose weight, I'm sure you'd know as a former athlete - you gotta burn calories man. how? Workouts that make you sweat, sweat and sweat! Cardio workouts lasting more that 30 minutes are the most efficient ways of losing weight. Vary your intensity, and distance if possible. Lastly, FUN, most important to keep you working out and achieving your goal. All the best man
 

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I'm not sure how good it is for losing weight and as a workout in a technical sense, but I just started doing a Run-Bike-Run workout. I hate running, but it offers a pretty intense workout for me and is a good change of pace with all the cycling I've been doing.

I run for about 13 minutes (will eventually up it over time), then get on my bike and cycle 10 miles (about 40 minutes, it just so happens to be a convenient loop with a nice bridge in there for a hill since it's flat where I live). Then I get back and run for another 13 minutes.

I feel the first run loosens me up and warms up the muscles, I stretch before getting on the bike. Then I run again and stretch afterwards. Before when I ran it used to really tear up my quads, I don't know why, but this has helped ease me into it. You don't have to do this every time, but once or twice a week might give you a nice change of pace. Oh and cross training is always good; especially when you start to hit a plateau in your training.
 

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Impulse Athletic Coaching
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kriton12 said:
I'm not sure how good it is for losing weight and as a workout in a technical sense, but I just started doing a Run-Bike-Run workout.

I've never done a triathlon, but I have done a bike-run exercise while trying to convince myself to do a tri. Running RIGHT after a bike workout is the absolute weirdest feeling.

I'm with everybody else - have fun and take 500cal/day less than what you should be.

Good luck.
 
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