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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Choice of Felt or Cannondale -- Tri Bike

Hi, I have a 2007 Felt S32 and have the option to get a never ridden 2006 Cannondale six13 Slice for less than half off, original MSRP around $3300.

The Felt is all aluminum. The Cannondale frame is a mix of carbon/aluminum with carbon top and down tubes and aluminum seat tube and stays. I had a LBS that told me that they would not buy a carbon bike until just recently because the carbon of a couple years ago just wasn't quality enough, not sure if that's true or not? I would like the benefits of carbon for more ride comfort, that said my Felt is a nice ride but for an extra $500 should I go Cannondale carbon, keep in mind it's a never ridden 2006 model, not the fancy new redisigned all carbon 2009 Slice model (I don't have the cash for that).

Thanks.
 

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chuggets said:
I had a LBS that told me that they would not buy a carbon bike until just recently because the carbon of a couple years ago just wasn't quality enough, not sure if that's true or not?
That's not necessarily true. Trek, Giant and Krestrel (to name a few) have been making quality carbon bikes for over 10 years now. Here is some food for thought, it's safe to estimate that the majority of mid and serious levels road bikes have been safely sold with carbon forks for over 10 years, regardless of whether the bike was Ti, steel or aluminum. Even a "forever" titanium is spec'd with a carbon fork. So if carbon wasn't safe/good/wise material until the past couple years, the bike business would be in deep trouble by now with all the bad carbon forks.

I rode full carbon back in 2001 for one summer. It was a Trek OCLV. I really liked the bike, but sold it by summer's end because I bought into the fear that carbon wouldn't last and went back to steel and alum. Well my two buddies who bought the same bike kept theirs and still ride them 7 years later no problem.

Before resorting to a new bike, here are some tips to make any current bike more comfy (assuming you haven't tried these yet):
  • Try 25c tires. I run the Continental Ultra Gator 25c at 20psi less than a 23c. Adds a little more of supple feel over the road. However, some frame frames may not accomodate the larger tire.
  • Gel bartape. Big boost in comfort, but not not good if you hands are small because it adds to the diameter of the bars.
  • Run a mid level padded saddle and not a race thin saddle. Specialized's Avatar Gel is a good mid weight saddle that has smoothened out my ride.
I had a very harsh riding alum Cinelli Xperience crit bike. I initially had the superthin Fizik Microtek bartape and the racer Specialized Toupe saddle and 23c tires at 120psi. Made all three changes above and the bike felt like a different bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
holy cromoly said:
Before resorting to a new bike, here are some tips to make any current bike more comfy (assuming you haven't tried these yet):
  • Try 25c tires. I run the Continental Ultra Gator 25c at 20psi less than a 23c. Adds a little more of supple feel over the road. However, some frame frames may not accomodate the larger tire.
  • Gel bartape. Big boost in comfort, but not not good if you hands are small because it adds to the diameter of the bars.
  • Run a mid level padded saddle and not a race thin saddle. Specialized's Avatar Gel is a good mid weight saddle that has smoothened out my ride.

I know very little about tires. I'm currently running Continental GP Force 24c in the back and Continental GP Attack 22c in the front both at 120psi. Are these any good? Are you saying to drop psi down to 100psi for more comfortable ride, front and back.

I'm pretty sure I have Gel bartape, when I squeeze it feels pretty padded.

I'm also running a Felt 3.3 carbon Tri saddle which I think is what came with the bike. I'll check out the Avatar Gel.
 
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