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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

I'm new to the road bike scene due to my recent interest in triathlons - I'm a MTB'er and am in need of some road tips/instruction.

Here are my questions:

#1. Should I sit while climbing or stand - in my most recent tri, I sat on the climbs and watched my speed drop from the high-teens or low 20's to 11-13 mph (rolling hills) - it seems like I could leave it in a higher gear and stand up to pump out those rolling hills and still keep my speed up - am I using flawed logic?

#2 What is a good average speed to shoot for on a 12-mile bike ride when I'll have to run a 5K afterwards? My last one I averaged around 16 mph -- it seems like I should be going faster - my training rides I did closer to 19 - but I wasn't dreading the run afterwards.

#3 How do you train for a run after riding hard for 12+ miles -- both tri's I've done my legs have felt like jell-o for the first mile - is there a good workout anyone can recommend to make this transition go a little smoother?
 

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1 - Both. Alternate between sitting and standing. Sitting and spinning faster will work your lungs, standing and pushing the higher gear will work your muscles. Don't put too much pressure on one system by alternating between the two.

2 - it really all depends. 16mph is a bit slow, yes, but you probably had a lot saved for the run. Work on utilizing your hamstrings in your pedal stroke more by pulling up with your foot on the upstroke to save your quads for the run.

3 - They're called brick workouts. Some people won't train without them, some people don't think they do any good. But in my opinion, practicing the transition can't hurt. Bike for about 90 minutes then hop off it, throw your shoes on, and run for 45. Your legs are going to feel like jelly, yes. But the more and more you do it the more and more you and your muscles will get used to it.
 

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1. It's very individual—some people stand a lot, others hardly ever. It takes a little more energy to ride out-of-the-saddle than seated, but sometimes the gain in speed is worth it. Many riders stand for a few seconds to lift speed a bit when they find themselves flagging, and to power over a short rise in the road.

2. If you can average 19 mph on flat terrain without wind, you need to be doing that speed in competition. Holding back for the run is not something I would recommend, but:

3. Many triathletes use bike positioning to make the bike-run transition easier on the legs. It's more complex than just moving the saddle forward.

Read all about it here: http://www.slowtwitch.com/
 

· Coffee Lover
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For question 3 - I've started doing this and it makes a world of difference:
After every bike ride, get off and run - even if it's only around the block. Try to do more if you can and have time. To quote a friend, "Your legs will get the message and will be more cooperative on your next Tri."
 

· Scary Teddy Bear
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Everyone

Gflysum said:
Thanks for the help -- those are some crazy fast times (maybe someday...)
else has given great pointers....

#1 AS far as climbing..you should do both. When I am in a race, I will climb for up to 4-5 minutes standing at a time, and then seated for as long as I need. But I am kinda sick and actually REALLY like climbing. Climbing effectively however is an art form and there is a lot more to it than simply "ride more hills".....You have to know HOW to ride the hills, when to shift, when to attack during a race, etc. You have to practice hills. A LOT. In my workout schedule for the bike portions.....I do one longer ride of 2-3 hours per week......more of a steady state ride...Then I do one ride of one hour at threshold........that one always sucks...then I do a ride of 1-2 hours with power intervals scheduled in a pyramid fashion (WITH A RUN AFTER), and then I do a short half hourish of hill repeats on a nasty hill right near my house. 13-15% and about 1/3 mile long......(I'll do that one on a swim day) (4 total rides per week)

If you get the chance...ride in some local TT's. You'll get faster....I'm about 3 minutes and some change from breaking the one hour 40k threshold.

#2 As fast as you can....that's far too complex for us to answer, and the reason is, that there are simply too many variables to account for when discussing average speed..(wind, terrain, temp, humidity, altitude, etc)....

#3 I ALWAYS do at least one brick weekly....sometimes I will also run one after my longer ride....(Assuming my wife is patient that day) Positioning will help, but the best thing is to make it like anything else....part of your routine....it will still hurt, but then you will be USED to it, and may be able to run through it better.

As an MTB'er, you may want to think about the Xterra tri's....they look like a f*cking blast....but they won't let me race a cross bike in them.....:mad2:

Good luck...tri's, IF you are wanting to get fast/faster, are really all about LOTS and LOTS of training....there really is no other way.
 

· Scary Teddy Bear
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livin4lax09 said:
i know, right? How lame is that?

Very lame indeed....:rolleyes:
 
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