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Hi guys

I'm new to road biking but not biking in general, however I never bothered to understand the different parts and components of a bike and the function of each before. Always had my friend help me out with assembling and fixing my old mountain bike.

So my first question is can you guys give me website that teach a beginner like myself who know nothing of road bikes everything about road bike, assembly, repair, maintenance and the in and out of each parts and what they are used for?

My 2nd question is what the different between a race and endurance road bike? Are race road bike faster than an endurance road bike? Endurance road bike are more comfy to ride so I would assume that no one would want a race road bike unless it is faster?

My last question is about biking shoe. Do you guys use mountain biking shoe cause they have cleat cause you can walk on or do you still prefer road bike shoe? Does it bother you guys that you can't walk using road bike shoe? And finally how do you know which road bikes shoe to get or what clip in pedal to get?


Thanks
 

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Sheldon Brown is known as one of the bike info gurus. His website is good.
Sheldon Brown-Bicycle Technical Information

Park Tool's website also is very helpful.
Park Tool Co. » ParkTool Blog

As for race vs. endurance, the difference is in the geometry. A race oriented bike will get the rider lower by default. It will be more likely to stretch you out in the upper. The wheel base is more likely to be shorter, resulting in a faster response though possibly feeling somewhat twitchy.

Endurance is going I put you more upright. It is, in general, considered better for longer rides. One bike is not necessarily faster, nor more comfortable. I personally felt more comfortable on my Specialized Allez (race geo) over the Specialized Roubaix (endurance). There are also plenty of people who race on an endurance bike. As the common saying goes, it's not the bike it's the motor. What really matters is what fits you comfortably and meets your needs. Talking with a few LBS and test rides are your best bet to figure this part out.

The question of shoes and pedals, much like the bike itself, is very personal and subjective. I use MTB pedals in both my road bike and Cyclocross bike. I like the dual sides entry. I also like to be able to use either of my shoes with either bike. I have a pair of road bike shoes (tri shoes actually) as well as mountain bike shoes. Both serve a purpose. If it is unlikely I will get off the bike much I prefer the road bike shoes. They are lighter, stiffer, and breathe better. I use the MTB shoes for commuting, it I am going off road at all, if I may be walking some, or I just want a more normal looking pair of shoes. It all depends on what you need. There is not a huge difference in performance between different pedals until you get to a high level so get what makes sense for you. I suggest you hold off on the shoes until you figure out the bike and ride a while. Then decide on what your needs are for the shoes and pedals and make a move.
 

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I would assume that no one would want a race road bike unless it is faster?

My last question is about biking shoe. Do you guys use mountain biking shoe cause they have cleat cause you can walk on or do you still prefer road bike shoe? Does it bother you guys that you can't walk using road bike shoe? And finally how do you know which road bikes shoe to get or what clip in pedal to get?

Thanks
To the first quote, not necessarily. While some cyclists perceive race geo as somewhat twitchy, others prefer that less input is required to change a line. On balance, it does require a higher level of concentration.

Generally, these bikes feel more responsive/ lively to some riders, and the more/ less aero positioning can (to a point) be equalized on both types of bikes with adjustments to stem angle/ spacers.

Similar to what's been stated, consider your cycling background, preferences and intended uses and (along with test rides) decide which between race and relaxed geo works best for you.

Re: MTB versus road shoes/ pedals, IMO your main criteria for choosing should be how important walk-ability is to you. The recessed cleats on MTB shoes allow for easier walking, but (generally speaking) the interface between cleat and pedal platform is larger on road systems.

Whichever you choose, my advice is to 1) try, then buy from your LBS and 2) don't cheap out on the shoes. A well designed, stiff soled shoe is worth it's weight in gold if it keeps you comfortable.

Lastly, remember that cleat set up generally requires tweaks to saddle positioning, so consider that when making the shoe/ pedal purchase.
 
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