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I am looking for some opinions.

I was involved in a high speed crash this weekend. Thing were busted up a bit and oh ya, me too. Anyway, I've been checking over the damage on the bike and the one thing that I am confused about is the chainring wobble. The rings themselves are not badly damaged (just barely scraped), but there is a significant wobble to them. I removed the chainrngs and checked them against a flat surface and they do not seem to be bent. I next checked the spiders to see if they were out of wack and they three of the five are bent out very slightly either that or the other two are bent slightly inward. I think the latter is the case as they are the two on either side of the arm itself which was impacted hard enough to break my pedal (keo carbon). i next rotated the crank arm parallel to the downtube and tried to gauge the arm's distance from the downtube from side to side and if there is any difference and if there is it is very slight.

So, here is my question. given the above situation, do you think I can just align the spiders using Kerry Irons method of straighting spiders that is posted in numerous threads on this forum and call it good ? Or should I just replace the crankset?
 

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makarios said:
So, here is my question. given the above situation, do you think I can just align the spiders using Kerry Irons method of straighting spiders that is posted in numerous threads on this forum and call it good ? Or should I just replace the crankset?
I tried straightening the spider on my bike, but I think it weakened the arms, because they were never straight for any length of time. I finally gave up and tossed on a spare arm that I had lying around.
 

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My ears are burning

makarios said:
do you think I can just align the spiders using Kerry Irons method of straighting spiders that is posted in numerous threads on this forum and call it good ? Or should I just replace the crankset?
You have nothing to lose by doing the alignment and seeing how things work out. filtersweep's experience has not been mine - I've not had things go out of whack easily after a straightening session. I suppose that could be dependent on the quality of the original forging, and it certainly would depend on how far things had to be bent.
 

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Kerry Irons said:
You have nothing to lose by doing the alignment and seeing how things work out. filtersweep's experience has not been mine - I've not had things go out of whack easily after a straightening session. I suppose that could be dependent on the quality of the original forging, and it certainly would depend on how far things had to be bent.

What the hell are YOU talking about? Forging? Apparently you didn't read the news release/thread, here, two or three months ago that reported that Shimano cranks are made by Chinese peasants who repeatedly toss the crank molds filled w/ molten Al alloy into the air.

Forging! Jeez....:rolleyes:
 

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You got me

alienator said:
What the hell are YOU talking about? Forging? Apparently you didn't read the news release/thread, here, two or three months ago that reported that Shimano cranks are made by Chinese peasants who repeatedly toss the crank molds filled w/ molten Al alloy into the air.

Forging! Jeez....:rolleyes:
BUT! In my defense, I think that there is enough centripital force generated in this process such that it has some elements of forging :) Where's Ishy to straighten us out?
 
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