Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,079 Posts
Good to see.

It seems to me that if you are a man about it and admit that you did wrong you'll still get the same suspension but at the end you'll be wecomed back and forgiven. Tyler's *****in' and moanin' in the face of such a wall of evidence just makes me want him to go away and stay away. I was pissed at Millar but now, he's done his time and is welcome back(with a little extra attention from the UCI)

Of course if Tyler really didn't do it(ha!) I think he should stick to his guns. But something tells me that he won't test positive for anything and his blood won't show signs of manipulation if he does make a come back. His poor performance will be blamed on the lack of racing and time away, and whatever else he can think of.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,561 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The UCI should reduce the suspensions of riders who admit to doping and provide information regarding the acquisition and use of doping methods. In the current system there is absolutely no reason for a rider to ever admit to anything.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,859 Posts
Don't confuse UCI with WADA or USADA

Dwayne Barry said:
The UCI should reduce the suspensions of riders who admit to doping and provide information regarding the acquisition and use of doping methods. In the current system there is absolutely no reason for a rider to ever admit to anything.

The UCI has nothing to do with administering suspension for drug violations. That is the jurisdiction of the rider's national federation. All the federations have signed the WADA code, mandating a 2 year suspension for first time drug offenses (and lifetime ban for 2nd offense).

Keep in mind that UCI and WADA have different priorities and objectives, and have been frequent adversaries. UCI was only brought kicking and screaming under the WADA system because the IOC required that all sports in the Olympics adhere to the WADA code (and even then, UCI dragged their feet and only signed the WADA code days before the 2004 Athens games).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,561 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Mark McM said:
The UCI has nothing to do with administering suspension for drug violations. That is the jurisdiction of the rider's national federation. All the federations have signed the WADA code, mandating a 2 year suspension for first time drug offenses (and lifetime ban for 2nd offense).

Keep in mind that UCI and WADA have different priorities and objectives, and have been frequent adversaries. UCI was only brought kicking and screaming under the WADA system because the IOC required that all sports in the Olympics adhere to the WADA code (and even then, UCI dragged their feet and only signed the WADA code days before the 2004 Athens games).
True, but there could clearly be somekind of motivation for riders to come clean. How about allow them to ride for a ProTour team at the end of 2 years. UCI could always lobby WADA to make an exception for cyclists, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
205 Posts
Well, that's why this all sucks

hayaku said:
...Of course if Tyler really didn't do it(ha!) I think he should stick to his guns. But something tells me that he won't test positive for anything and his blood won't show signs of manipulation if he does make a come back. His poor performance will be blamed on the lack of racing and time away, and whatever else he can think of.
Tyler is either:

1) Lying doping scum-sucking subhumanoid without a gram of class or humanity

2) Self-delusional, and has convinced himself he never did it, which makes him a weak, lying, doping scum-sucker... but ultimately a flawed human (like us all.)

or...
3) innocent and unlucky. Very unlikely... but something happened to me in my life that comes to mind. As an undergraduate, I was accused of academic cheating- of taking an exam after making arrangements to delay, and not returning the test. The professor was adamant that he personally handed me the exam, and that I then disapeared with the test. The professor was SO sure, that I began to even doubt myself! Never mind the fact that I was 400 miles away at the time of the test, at a conference with over 40 full professors, including my Department Chairman- who personally greeted me.

I had my Department Chairman call this professor, and explain that it was a FACT that I was at a conference with him, and that there must be some mistake- there was no possible way I was even in the State that day- so he really had no choice but to let me take the exam as we had agreed.

The Professor gave me the exam, but also looks that could kill and the comment "I don't know how you pulled this off, but I have no choice. I know for a fact you are a cheat, and I hope someday you get what you deserve!"

That kind of thing really changed me, in respect to what people think are "facts"- especially if you are the one who is truely wrongly accused. And also some small forgiveness for human frailty.

No doubt, dopers ruin the sport for everyone
 

·
lung lacking loser
Joined
·
270 Posts
Tyler has a lot more to lose than Bergman does by coming clean now. He just went through a year and a half long process of trying to prove his innocence. He is hoping to secure a ride for the end of the season/next season. Any admission of guilt now would make him look even more ridiculous.

Bergman on the other hand, is almost 2 years removed from his suspension, hasn't been touting his innocence since his appeal was denied, and is looking for a second chance. Time has passed, and it is no longer fresh in most people's minds (unlike TH who has been appealing for almost his whole suspension period). Bergman is also hoping that someone will throw him a bone and give him a ride. Coming clean may just be the "marketing" kick that he needs to get that ride. I may be wrong, but maybe his motives are less than noble.
 

·
NeoRetroGrouch
Joined
·
6,491 Posts
Dwayne Barry said:
http://velonews.com/news/fea/9497.0.html

Of course I think Bergman and Berden before him are nuts for admitting their EPO use everyone knows that test just generates false positives and the doping authorities just want to smear the good names of otherwise clean cyclists :)
Bergman waited two years and now knows that it will be easier for him to start racing (or have any interaction with cycling) if he admits wrong. You sound like he's some kind of saint. Maybe he's not even guilty and just wants an easier time going forward. Whatever, I think Hamilton still has 1 1/2 years before he is in the same position. - TF
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,387 Posts
It's spin...

beaker said:
Tyler has a lot more to lose than Bergman does by coming clean now. He just went through a year and a half long process of trying to prove his innocence. He is hoping to secure a ride for the end of the season/next season. Any admission of guilt now would make him look even more ridiculous.

Bergman on the other hand, is almost 2 years removed from his suspension, hasn't been touting his innocence since his appeal was denied, and is looking for a second chance. Time has passed, and it is no longer fresh in most people's minds (unlike TH who has been appealing for almost his whole suspension period). Bergman is also hoping that someone will throw him a bone and give him a ride. Coming clean may just be the "marketing" kick that he needs to get that ride. I may be wrong, but maybe his motives are less than noble.
It's all spin from Bergman in my opinion. His suspension is almost up, and no doubt, he'll be looking to make a comeback, and to ride again professionally, he's not that old as it is. If he's doing this now; why didn't he do it say, way the heck back when he first got busted? He did try to get off the doping infraction. I still have no respect for someone who comes out and says, years later, "Yeah, I did it." The question that always comes to mind for me is; If they had not gotten caught would they still be doing it? I think the answer is most likely yes..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
985 Posts
Dwayne Barry said:
True, but there could clearly be somekind of motivation for riders to come clean. How about allow them to ride for a ProTour team at the end of 2 years. UCI could always lobby WADA to make an exception for cyclists, etc.
4-year ban inProTour is not enforced neither by WADA, nor by UCI. This ban is part of ProTour code voluntarely ;) signed by ProTour Teams. Accoding to recent UCI explanation UCI has no power or intention to force it on any team that woul select to broke it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,859 Posts
??????

al0 said:
4-year ban inProTour is not enforced neither by WADA, nor by UCI. This ban is part of ProTour code voluntarely ;) signed by ProTour Teams. Accoding to recent UCI explanation UCI has no power or intention to force it on any team that woul select to broke it.
But the UCI developed and administers the ProTour, and created the ProTour code. They also have the power to decide who is allowed (or not allowed) into the ProTour. You may recall that the UCI almost excluded the Phonak team from the ProTour, largely due to the way they handled the Hamilton/Perez doping situation. How can you say that UCI has nothing to do with the enforcement of the 4 year ban for drug suspensions?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
804 Posts
TurboTurtle said:
Bergman waited two years and now knows that it will be easier for him to start racing (or have any interaction with cycling) if he admits wrong.
I highly doubt it, he has a ride one way or another the minute his suspension is up. Knowing Adam I think this has been eating at him for a while. He's a good guy who made a really bad decision AND got caught. I'd hate to have had the same pressures on me at the age of 22.
 

·
NeoRetroGrouch
Joined
·
6,491 Posts
PMC said:
I highly doubt it, he has a ride one way or another the minute his suspension is up. Knowing Adam I think this has been eating at him for a while. He's a good guy who made a really bad decision AND got caught. I'd hate to have had the same pressures on me at the age of 22.
I should apologize and say I really know little about him or his case. I just object to the original post implying that someone admitting to use proves that everybody is doped. - TF
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
985 Posts
Mark McM said:
But the UCI developed and administers the ProTour, and created the ProTour code. They also have the power to decide who is allowed (or not allowed) into the ProTour. You may recall that the UCI almost excluded the Phonak team from the ProTour, largely due to the way they handled the Hamilton/Perez doping situation. How can you say that UCI has nothing to do with the enforcement of the 4 year ban for drug suspensions?
Very easy::p
"UCI's Enrico Carpani enlightened Cyclingnews about the rules: "The four years additional ban comes from the code of ethics decided on and accepted by the teams, and not by the UCI rules," he said. "The UCI has no power over that, so the decision to maintain and respect this agreement will be an exclusively 'internal affair' for them.". See, for example,
http://www.cyclingnews.com/news.php?id=features/2006/hamilton_appeal
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,387 Posts
No doubt..

PMC said:
I highly doubt it, he has a ride one way or another the minute his suspension is up. Knowing Adam I think this has been eating at him for a while. He's a good guy who made a really bad decision AND got caught. I'd hate to have had the same pressures on me at the age of 22.
I have no doubt that he's a nice guy, he seems like he is, and if you say so, I'll take your word for it. I guess the timing of it all has my scratching my head. If this has been bothering him for so long, why wait until now to come clean about it? He definitely made a bad decision, and if he wants to do something about it, then I might see things differently. Maybe become some sort of anti doping crusader in the sport, become outspoken about not taking drugs to be able to compete, and things like that, you know, set an example of I did this, and it was bad, but you don't have to. Do as I say, not as I do sort of thing. I'd have a lot more respect for him then.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top