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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I started seriously road cycling last fall when I purchased a 2008 Super Six 3. Right now I'm working towards a century ride without taking a break off of the bike. My max is 62 miles.

The issue is that around the 40-50 mile mark, I feel a little beat up in the buttocks and groin.

Is the Super Six a viable century bike or is it really a race bike? That is, is what I'm enduring expected with any bike and will improve over time? Or, would I have been better off on a Synapse?
 

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Super Six should be fine. (Although I have not tried it). I have however taken my CAAD7 for 133 miles, without too much discomfort.
The geometry is tried and tested for long tour stages. It's not the frame. Especially with a long top tube. Should allow you to stretch out.


Have you tried different seats?
Moving around on the seat?
How often do you get out of the saddle?
Type of shorts or pad?
A gel pad helps for that kind of distance.
 

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I would say that the Synapse would be the bike of choice. The CAAD frame starts to get to me after about 75 miles.
 

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i think you can do it on your super 6 . i actualy think my super 6 is comfy , but im pretty small 5'10 ,155 lbs
 

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I've done numerous centuries last year on my super six plus a 200 mi, 4300 ft elev. ride and i'm no more sore than a 50 mi ride. Rdes with more hills tend to be better because it takes you off the seat occasionally.
 

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its never the bike, but that said, the full carbon supersix is pretty vibration free.

I would suggest trying out different saddles, the issue could be blood flow to the legs if it is causing numbness etc.... getting out of the saddle helps...

i saw a massive difference swapping my saddle for an arione YMMV.
 

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Hup, Hup
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I would agree with previous posters concerning making sure that the saddle as well as the overall rider fit on the bike are both good. I've done several 100+ mile rides on my SystemSix with no problems and would not foresee any problems occurring on a SuperSix
 

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cbuchanan said:
I would agree with previous posters concerning making sure that the saddle as well as the overall rider fit on the bike are both good. I've done several 100+ mile rides on my SystemSix with no problems and would not foresee any problems occurring on a SuperSix
I've done several centuries on my System Six as well without problems. I would try different shorts/bibs and/or new seat. Sometimes just adjusting the seat makes a big difference. Either way, you'll want to give your buttocks a rest at some point. Going 60 miles non-stop is going to take its toll regardless of the bike frame.
 

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here's my $0.02,

I have a Caad9 bike. I haven't ridden it more than about 60 miles to date.

I previously owned a Trek Madone 5.2SL full carbon bike that was amazingly smooth over the rough stuff. Longest ride on the Madone was about 80miles.

The Aluminum Caad 9 surely is a rougher ride, especially over rougher roads and bumpy roads. I have found comfort in having a comfortable saddle (same saddle I was using on the Madone) and now discovered that Michelin Pro2 Race tires help out a lot. Infact, the ride quality with the Michelin Pro2 Race tires I am comparing to being as smooth or smoother than I remember my Madone.

I think of my Caad 9 as a comfortable bike for long rides because I am fit well to it and have relatively smooth routes to choose from here in Northern California.

The other thing I notice is that my Caad 9 is in no way as rough of a ride compared to my Capo track frame, now that thing can beat up the back end!

The Synapse or Six with a little more "comfort" geometry is likely a more comfortable option to the Caad 9. Coming from the Trek that I had, I like the Cannondale Caad 9 geometry better.

Full carbon bikes are hard to beat for comfort.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks everyone. Is the conclusion that a Synapse vs. Super Six for a century will likely not make a difference, that discomfort should be expected on a long ride, and discomfort can be reduced with a different saddle or tires?

Again, I'm working towards a century but am I wrong to believe that it must be done without a break to be legit? If I bike 60 miles, take a 2 hour lunch and nap, and bike 40 miles later on the same day... is that a legit century?
 

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mlin said:
Again, I'm working towards a century but am I wrong to believe that it must be done without a break to be legit? If I bike 60 miles, take a 2 hour lunch and nap, and bike 40 miles later on the same day... is that a legit century?
Funny you should ask this!..... I started out road bike riding because I liked to go fast, and I was pretty good at it. I did some racing and was interested in racing. I used to go out and ride 70 miles with two large water bottles and a Power Bar or two without stopping. The club that I joined dragged me to a "century" ride some Sunday morning as I was headed out for the usual club training ride. I was a little nervous as I had never done that distance before. I had done 70 mile USCF road races a few times. I was greeted with a pleasant 25 mile trot from feed zone to feed zone, finishing the 100 mile ride with energy to spare. I'm not aware of any century rides that do not have support stops along the way. I guess you could just skip them all!
 

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mlin said:
Thanks everyone. Is the conclusion that a Synapse vs. Super Six for a century will likely not make a difference, that discomfort should be expected on a long ride, and discomfort can be reduced with a different saddle or tires?

Again, I'm working towards a century but am I wrong to believe that it must be done without a break to be legit? If I bike 60 miles, take a 2 hour lunch and nap, and bike 40 miles later on the same day... is that a legit century?
The premise of your question/issue should be rephrased. Rather than asking what is better bike for a century, what is a better bike for long distance riding. A century is one event. I highly doubt that you are considering getting a new bike for one event. If your goal is to do centuries on a frequent basis, then your question is a bit clearer. Even still, for the purposes of a century I believe with the proper saddle and bike fit, a SuperSix is comparably comfortable to a Synapse, and it surely is no reason to get rid of the SuperSix because you plan on doing centuries.

A century is an "event" but does it require a specialized kind of bike? I don't think so. Most people get sore after riding 60-70 miles without stopping, and it has little to do with the frame. As others have said, it has to do mostly with conditioning/fitness, bike fit and saddle choice. I would make incremental changes, since if you change saddle, bike fit (fore aft saddle position, stem length/height) and tire pressure all at once, you won't know what works/what doesn't work.

As for what constitutes a century, use your common sense. Most organized rides that do centuries do have periodic stops every 20-30 miles, and even if you use all of them and finish, you've still done a century. Look at normal folks who do marathons. You can run a 6-7 hour marathon (perhaps walking a bit or stopping a few minutes for a breather), it is still a marathon. Common sense would appear to say that if you did several stops on your century at a reasonable 15-20 minutes per stop, you're not cheating on your century. Actually, from my experience and what others tell me, it's more painful to stop for a long period of time (30 minutes) and then get back on the bike.

On the other hand, if you decide to take a 2 hour lunch followed by a siesta under a shady tree in the middle of the ride, well--you'll have to be honest with yourself as to whether you've done a 100 miles of "straight" riding.
 

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STARNUT said:
Good tires at a correct pressure will do more for comfort than any frame material.

Starnut
What would you recommend as a "good tire and good pressure"?
I am using Conti gp 4000s and pressure around 105-110psi but I am new to road cycling and would love to hear your suggestions
 

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lucky13 said:
What would you recommend as a "good tire and good pressure"?
I am using Conti gp 4000s and pressure around 105-110psi but I am new to road cycling and would love to hear your suggestions
I'll butt in here!... I'm using 130-140 psi. (on my old Silca pump gauge) with my current Michelin Pro2 Race tires before stopping, I find this good with these tires 700x23c size, I haven't found a road tire (700x23c) that works below 120psi (on my Silca pump gauge). I weigh 165lbs.

I don't know where Michelin came up with the 116psi. max. pressure rating!?........ I guess it's some legal jargon!
 

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Without a doubt, the Synapse is the best Cdale for a century. It was designed for all day, long distance comfort, amd also for those of us who can't handle a low, aero position for long periods of time. However, the Supersix is a close second, and is still a comfortable bike, it's just that it is a full-on race bike first, that just happens to be a smooth riding race bike. As others have said, saddle and tire selection will make a big difference in comfort, so consider those before plunking down big money on a new bike just to do centuries. Another item to consider is a stem with more rise. A stem with a 17 degree rise instead of a 6 or 7 degree rise will put your handlebars 1-2" higher and could give the more upright positioning of a Synapse. I ride a Synapse SL with a Dura Ace triple group, and for my 48 year old, less than skinny body, it is the perfect machine. But few people are going to feel sorry for you because you are riding a SuperSix!
 

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Naso Unicornis
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I don't think you'll be uncomfortable using your Super Six to ride a Century (Metric/Standard). If fitting is an issue, then that's not the bike's fault. The Super Six is very smooth and comfortable. You'll appreciate its efficiency in hilly areas as well.

As many have stated, adjust your tire pressure accordingly, especially if you encounter stretches of poor road surface. At 110psi, my Super Six absorbs everything, even on the muck.

CHL
 

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kneejerk said:
I'll butt in here!... I'm using 130-140 psi. (on my old Silca pump gauge) with my current Michelin Pro2 Race tires before stopping, I find this good with these tires 700x23c size, I haven't found a road tire (700x23c) that works below 120psi (on my Silca pump gauge). I weigh 165lbs.

I don't know where Michelin came up with the 116psi. max. pressure rating!?........ I guess it's some legal jargon!

That's way too much pressure for somebody your weight (IMHO)
try running just at 100 and see what you think. You will get a better ride more grip in the corners.
There won't be any noticable difference in rolling resistance. I will post articles on this if I can find them
 
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