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I've been using Simple Green to clean my chain, but it doesn't seem to get all the grease off the chain. The pully wheels on the rear der get super caked with grease, and my chain cleaning tool even gets this sticky black build-up on the wheels inside that won't come off for anything. I've tried some 409 as well, but that didn't do the trick either. Anything wrong with using gasoline as the innitial cleaner, then wash it off with something else before lubing the chain again? Citrus cleaner? (any particular brand?)
 

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NeoRetroGrouch
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johngfoster said:
I've been using Simple Green to clean my chain, but it doesn't seem to get all the grease off the chain. The pully wheels on the rear der get super caked with grease, and my chain cleaning tool even gets this sticky black build-up on the wheels inside that won't come off for anything. I've tried some 409 as well, but that didn't do the trick either. Anything wrong with using gasoline as the innitial cleaner, then wash it off with something else before lubing the chain again? Citrus cleaner? (any particular brand?)
Gasoline is way to volatile, dangerous and unnecessary. If you want to use a petroleum solvent, use kerosine/WD-40. Dispose of properly.

Also try a good, sudsy dish washing liquid.

TF
 

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TurboTurtle said:
Gasoline is way to volatile, dangerous and unnecessary. If you want to use a petroleum solvent, use kerosine/WD-40. Dispose of properly.

Also try a good, sudsy dish washing liquid.

TF
Please don't use WD40. It dissolves grease. Try FL Ecotech or Citrus Degreaser. If you want to use petroleum based solvent use Diesel, it's what many old school Pro mechanics like Steve Snowling used, it works but leaves a residue.

If you keep the bike clean with good old soap & water you won't need anything heavy duty anyway.
 

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Every little counts...
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Mineral Spirits or Kerosene.

Kerosene is easy, when its dirty I jest go out back and throw it on the garbage fire.
 

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No need to clean the chain

I think you're using the wrong chain lube if you experience "pull(e)y wheels on the rear der get super caked with grease, and my chain cleaning tool even gets this sticky black build-up on the wheels." Assuming we're talking road riding, use the following technique for successful ProLink or homebrew lube (1 part motor oil to 3-4 parts odorless mineral spirits) application and use:

1 - wipe the chain, cogs, pulleys, and chainrings clean with a rag.
2 - drip on lube while pedaling (forward is better) so that the chain just starts to drip lube. Aim the lube between the side plates and between the bushings and the side plates.
3 - run through all the gears several times, front and back.
4 - wipe the chain, cogs, pulleys, and chainrings clean with a rag.
5 - repeat steps 2-4 if the chain was really dirty

If you do this every 300 miles or so (or when you get caught in the rain), you will not get any significant gunky buildup, and you won't have to clean the chain.

No lube is "perfect." A brite shiny chain that is clean to the touch but is well lubed and gives long mileage is still not possible. IMO, ProLink is the best compromise.
 

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Resident Dutchbag
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TurboTurtle said:
Gasoline is way to volatile, dangerous and unnecessary. If you want to use a petroleum solvent, use kerosine/WD-40. Dispose of properly.

Also try a good, sudsy dish washing liquid.

TF
Dish washing liquid is what the pro mechanics use for cleaning bikes in general. They stockplile a bunch of bottles of their prefered brand to take to the grand tours.

For chain cleaning see Kerry's posting.
 

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Old Skool
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Wd-40?

ultimobici said:
Please don't use WD40. It dissolves grease. Try FL Ecotech or Citrus Degreaser. If you want to use petroleum based solvent use Diesel, it's what many old school Pro mechanics like Steve Snowling used, it works but leaves a residue.

If you keep the bike clean with good old soap & water you won't need anything heavy duty anyway.
I do not understand the criticism of WD-40 for “dissolving grease”. Isn’t the OP asking for degreasing advice? Please explain.

Personally, I do not like to use WD-40 on any part of a bike; not for cleaning, not for anything. The film of oil that it leaves behind attracts too much dust and grit and interferes with other lubricants that one might apply after the fact.
 

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There was a time that Coleman's Camping white fuel was used to degrease chains. Then they recommended dipping your chain in melted parafin wax.

I don't know if people still do this.
 

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Stogaguy said:
I do not understand the criticism of WD-40 for “dissolving grease”. Isn’t the OP asking for degreasing advice? Please explain.

Personally, I do not like to use WD-40 on any part of a bike; not for cleaning, not for anything. The film of oil that it leaves behind attracts too much dust and grit and interferes with other lubricants that one might apply after the fact.
WD-40 gets everywhere. Not only on the area you want it to, but also places you'd rather it didn't.
 

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Just Ride!!!!!
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I've been using Kafko "Oil Eater" from Kragen. It's water based and works awesome.

* * * Product Description * * *
OIL EATER safely dissolves grease and oil on asphalt or concrete driveways, engines, lawn mowers, tools, ovens and outdoor grills. It's excellent as a pre-wash for dirty clothes and will remove most stains from carpets, floor mats and upholstery. An excellent concentrate for pressure washing and parts cleaning machines. Diluted as directed, Oil Eater saves money. An application and dilution chart is included on the rear label of all packages. The chart is expanded on the one gallon, five gallon, and fifty-five gallon sizes to cover commercial, industrial and utility applications. NON-FLAMMABLE, CONTAINS NO ACIDS, ABRASIVES OR PETROLEUM SOLVENTS. AUTHORIZED BY USDA FOR CLEANING NON-FOOD AREAS. OIL EATER CLEANER/DEGREASER is a water-based, fresh-scented, biodegradable cleaner that effectively replaces flammable or combustible solvent cleaners. It contains no hazardous chlorinated/fluorinated solvents or acidic-type chemicals. OIL EATER'S formulation safely accomplishes the cleaning that previously required solvent or acid cleaners and exposed the user and the environment to the inherent hazards of such chemicals. This unique formula of non-ionic surfactants, emulsifiers, water softeners and other biodegradable ingredients cuts through oily and greasy dirt, encapsulating the oil and dirt into a solution that can easily be rinsed away. OIL EATER CLEANER/DEGREASER has been used successfully by the automotive, machine tool, metal fabricating, micro processing, packaging, professional fabric cleaning and many more industries for production as well as maintenance of their facilities. IT TRULY IS THE ONE NEW CLEANER THAT REPLACES MANY.
 

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Roadbike Rider
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It doesn't say bicycle on the bottle

You can't use that. You have to buy the same thing from a bicycle shop for 4 times as much. Maybe it will say Pedro's or Phil Wood or maybe even Campagnolo brand. Then you can clean your chain like the pros do.
 

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Kerry's right...

Kerry Irons said:
I think you're using the wrong chain lube if you experience "pull(e)y wheels on the rear der get super caked with grease, and my chain cleaning tool even gets this sticky black build-up on the wheels." Assuming we're talking road riding, use the following technique for successful ProLink or homebrew lube (1 part motor oil to 3-4 parts odorless mineral spirits) application and use:

1 - wipe the chain, cogs, pulleys, and chainrings clean with a rag.
2 - drip on lube while pedaling (forward is better) so that the chain just starts to drip lube. Aim the lube between the side plates and between the bushings and the side plates.
3 - run through all the gears several times, front and back.
4 - wipe the chain, cogs, pulleys, and chainrings clean with a rag.
5 - repeat steps 2-4 if the chain was really dirty

If you do this every 300 miles or so (or when you get caught in the rain), you will not get any significant gunky buildup, and you won't have to clean the chain.

No lube is "perfect." A brite shiny chain that is clean to the touch but is well lubed and gives long mileage is still not possible. IMO, ProLink is the best compromise.
I use motor oil too and find that it works just as well or even better than expensive lube. Before this, I was using the Finish Line Green(wet) lube as I never fancied waxes/greases aka dry lubes. Dry lubes are a b*tch to clean and gunk up badly in dusty conditions. Wet ones are much easier to wipe off with a rag.

Now, I am on homebrew and I just apply lots of the stuff on my chain after every two rides as its cheap anyway. Now I save on degreaser as the homebrew flushes out dirt as it drips off the bike. I then wipe drip with a rag and my chain is always shiny looking. I do a major degrease every 2 weeks or whenever after a ride where the riding conditions was very bad.

As for WD-40 as a degreaser, it is a bad idea if u spry directly onto your hubs or bb as they are penetrating and will find their way into them. I screwed up a rear hub as I had the habit of just spray WD-40 onto the cassette to clean them. Now i spray WD-40 onto the rag and then use it to wipe the cassette.
 

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Kant phuckin sphell
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Hell, I use gas. I have enough of it laying around for generators and lawnmowers.It goes bad if it sits too long anyways. Its cheap too. Works great! I pour some into a gatorade bottle and drop the chain in and shake! Esp. a new chain with that nasty wax.
 

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Resident Curmudgeon
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Chainstay said:
You can't use that. You have to buy the same thing from a bicycle shop for 4 times as much. Maybe it will say Pedro's or Phil Wood or maybe even Campagnolo brand. Then you can clean your chain like the pros do.
:D ROLF:D
 

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Lot of people like homebrew but I never used it and I don't like the idea of oil being thrown off on me and the bike as I ride. I also don't like the idea that oil will attract dirt. If I used homebrew I would use a synthetic motor oil.

Right now I'm using Rock 'n Roll Gold lube. When that's gone, I'll probably try Purple Extreme.

Any low refined petroleum product leaves a residue, it's oil. I don't know how this residue will react to store bought lubes. It's possible it could reduce the effectiveness of the lube by breaking it down or the lube won't stick. I don't know, this is just speculation.

I have several beater bikes, no shock K-Mart MTB and a Schwinn 10 speed that I just WD-40 or motor oil on it for years. Since I use synthetic motor oil in cars, I'm going to try the home brew on those bikes.

For a degreaser, I would not use any form of a petroleum because of the residue it leaves behind but I would use paint thinner because it's highly refined and evaporates. After I use the paiint thinner, I then use a floor degreaser that I get from a janitorial supply store. It's is incredibly cheap, 1 gal is $7.00 and it makes 32 gallons of cleaner. You use 1 oz per quart of water. If you don't want to use the paint thinner, then just use the degreaser. For cleaning the chain, I use a 1/2 gallon cardboard juice/milk container with a slot in each end that the chain rides in. I either put in the paint thinner or the mixed degreaser in the container and I use a parts brush to clean the chain. Everything just drips back in the container. After I'm done, I then filter out the liquid, using a paper towel in a funnel placed in a water/soda bottle. After a week or two, all the sediment has settled to the bottom, I then pour the "cleaner" into another soda/water bottle to be used next time. I have several bottles that I use as the pre-wash, wash, rinse, final rinse.
 

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Kant phuckin sphell
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What do you use to lube you chain? Icewax?
Do you run your chains dry?
How do you notice residue from a petroleum product?
I would think any residue from a petroleum product that stays on a chain is only going to help lubricate it, along with the lube I put on there!

Petroleum is a kick as lube!
I think that is why they still use it cars! :)
 
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