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Read article here.

Thought this was an interesting article. People who live in the cities mentioned, chime in.

Take care.
 

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I'm in Albuquerque - I think it's great to see our city listed! The city is continuously improving bike paths, creating lanes and such for bikers to ride. I've only been biking for a year, but Albuquerque has got to be one of the best places to ride! You have great mtb trails in the city, 20 minutes away - and you can easily create a route to get in 100 miles within the city.

And that's just Albuquerque - the entire state is great for both road and mtb riding! So come visit and bring money for the ecomony :)
 

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Great to see Albuquerque on the list. The Saturday night poker rides are awesome! The trail systems are fantastic and getting better! Albuquerque has a very fortunate accident of geography that makes it really easy to set up very nice isolated trail systems that cover the city. Now if we could just get a handle on the drunk drivers. :(
 

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Any article that cites Critical Mass participation as evidence of a city's bike culture is immediately suspect.
 

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I'm in the Salt Lake City metropolitan area, and it's hardly bicycle friendly. It may be becoming increasingly so, though. There certainly is a large bike community here, which helps, but there are relatively few bike routes or trails that are particularly safe.

The authors of the article cite only SLC proper, noting a population of 180K, but it's in a metropolitan area of 1 million. There have been several hit and run accidents here this year already, and the penalties for that offense are a joke.

Charlie
 

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I live in ABQ for about 17 years and can attest to the possibilities that are there. We moved away because we had a child and didn't want to raise him in the gang-infested streets (and poor school system) there though. When I left 3 years ago the cycling community was trying to gather some momentum. Hopefully they can keep it going and the rest of the (non-cyclist) community can work out the gangs and drunk drivers.

I now live in a city that probably should have been on that list; Columbia MO. We have a department of the city that has League of American Cyclist-trained instructors teaching bicycle safety to citizens and has actually helped re-train local law-enforcement on the actual bicycle-related statutes and the interpretation of them. Of course the officers learn the laws as part of their training, but the emphasis is more about staying alive and other more common things they'll deal with. For instance, the law re: lane position here (and in most if not all cities) uses the language a "ride as far to the right as practicable", not as far as possible as most people think. Basically that means that a cyclist should ride as far to the right side of the lane as you can safely and without causing damage to your bicycle or endangering pedestrians.

We have a large number of commuters, randonneurs, tourists, mountain bikers and an active road and MTB racing scene too. Even our Mayor is an avid bike commuter/cyclist. One of my favorite commuting customers is a guy that, while he owns a big shiney Dodge Ram, he rides his bike everywhere. He does a ton of volunteer work, including cycling events and rides to all of them. Even in towns 100+ miles away. He's also one of the most atypical hard-core cyclists you'll find. He strikes you as the kind of guy that would be driving his truck every chance he got instead of the other way around.

Bob
 

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nice a$$..pitty about the Tat though :cool:
 

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I'm in Austin. Seems bike-friendly enough. We've found cycle friendly alternatives to all the major highways. We commute to work without trouble. We also ride to the movies, the store, across town to my parents, and on nice long weekend rides. 90% of the time we leave from our house on the bikes and never have to load them up to go for a ride.

Austin also has a veloway on the south side of town. A 3 mile curvy twisty one-way loop for cyclists and roller bladers ONLY (no walkers, no joggers, no motorized traffic).

Austin has hills, and flats, depending on what side of town you're on. The Balcones fault line provides as much hill climbing as I need.

We live a good 15 miles from downtown, but whenever we are downtown we notice tons of cyclists.

Austin also has 20+ bike shops, so certainly no lack of support or variety.

We rarely have bad weather to deal with (unless you count the heat in the summer, which I don't). We had a windy spring this year, but only a few days were what I would call unridable. From late May to October you just have to hydrate to beat the heat.

Not ever road I would travel by car is bike friendly, but there are alternatives that don't lengthen the route by TOO much, so I'm basically thrilled.
 

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Loraura said:
I'm in Austin. Seems bike-friendly enough. We've found cycle friendly alternatives to all the major highways.....

....Austin also has a veloway on the south side of town. A 3 mile curvy twisty one-way loop for cyclists and roller bladers ONLY (no walkers, no joggers, no motorized traffic).

Austin also has 20+ bike shops, so certainly no lack of support or variety.
does the 'lance' effect have anything to do with any/all of this?
 

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Dumbod said:
Any article that cites Critical Mass participation as evidence of a city's bike culture is immediately suspect.
Actually, wouldn't an active critical mass be an indication of a bad cycling city?

After all if one has a really good "cycling culture" and a city government that respects cyclists, you don't really need critical mass.
 

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muscleendurance said:
does the 'lance' effect have anything to do with any/all of this?
I don't know. Not for me it doesn't. There are a lot of Trek's running around. But then, there are a bunch of shops that sell Treks... sooo....

Austin is a big college town, so I think that has some to do with it. The University of Texas has something like 5,000 student parking spaces and 50,000 plus students. You simply can't drive and park there. So biking or taking the various UT shuttle busses are the only true viable methods of transortation.

Also, Austin has lots of houses within easy bike-commute to downtown. Austin has also built up the downtown condo living lifestyle. I could see how young professionals could live and work downtown and rarely if ever need a car.

Austin also has several long stretches of road with minimal stop lights that are bicycle friendly (wide shoulders) like 360 and Parmer Lane. Driving down either of these two roads, it is nearly impossible to NOT see a cyclist from 5 AM to 8 PM.

Austin's major drawback right now is the lack of massive high speed public transit. However, the light rail is under contruction. They've already given tours and such. They are real close to having it running. I beleive last I read they were waiting on the feds to approve something to go live. This will give us suburbanites a valid way to bike/train to work from the outskirts to downtown, leaving the car in the garage.
 

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I heartily agree...

buck-50 said:
Actually, wouldn't an active critical mass be an indication of a bad cycling city?

After all if one has a really good "cycling culture" and a city government that respects cyclists, you don't really need critical mass.
As I said above Columbia Mo is a good cycling city, but the kids at one of the three colleges/universities sometimes try to put together a Critical Mass ride here. They usually get a handful of other students, most or all being new to the area not realizing they have little or nothing to protest. When we hear of one it usually gets a good laugh at the shop, from patrons and employees alike who recognize the situation. I understand; they want to do something for the cause, and that's really good. But they really need to save all that angst and energy for when they're done with school here and move away to someplace that could really use it.

I'm not really a fan of those rides anyway. I think they create more problems than they solve. They need to use the time and energy constructively, not burn bridges that have taken somebody years to construct..
 
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