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I'm trying to seek out advice for frame bag or pack solutions for some longer training rides this season.The rides I'd being doing in which I need the extra space would be around 250 at the lowest and possibly up to 400km. All I'm looking for is a little extra storage to fit some gear and possibly some light walking around clothes if I'm doing an overnight trip.

I guess my first question would be where is the best place on the bike to add a bag to? Seat post? Frame? Handlebars? The bike that I'd be looking to do this on is pretty similar to a Specialized Tarmac in terms of frame shape and design. I'm also only interested in easy to remove and add bags, so no racks or panniers for me.

Any advice or suggestions would be great. All of my cycling experience comes from racing so I'm quite clueless when it comes to touring.
 

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gazing from the shadows
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Given the requirements, I would go with a saddle bag of some sort. Things like this:

https://www.biketiresdirect.com/pro...ck?v=reg0000&gclid=CPqFnMLBl9ICFcS6wAodSpAExQ

Since I have a Brooks, I would consider these myself as well.

https://www.rivbike.com/collections/bags/products/sackville-saddlesack-small-olive-20131

https://www.rivbike.com/collections/bags/products/sackville-saddlesack-medium-olive-20132

I have no experience with them, but try searching for "bicycle large saddle bag". You should find some options, and reviews from users.

If you lay out what you plan to carry, for the largest load, and try stuffing that into various size boxes, you should have some idea of the dimensions/cubic you need.
 

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i use the carradice zipped roll.



got it (and the saddle) from spa cycles in the uk.
 
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I like the Arkel Randonneur seat post rack and Tailrider bag. This rack clamps to the seat rails and only braces against the seat post, so it is safe to use with carbon seat posts (though I am not sure about carbon seat rails - I don't have any saddles with those).

https://www.arkel-od.com/
 

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Search for bike camping and frame bags. Bike camping bags seem to be a quickly growing cottage industry.

Relevate, rogue panda designs, a bunch more.

As you search out reviews, you will find more brands. There are a lot of them that make cutom fit bags for your needs and bike.
 

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I love frame bags (1/2 frame type) for just what you want to do. Like over night hotel trips, and commuting, picking up sandwiches to eat at a beautiful spot, put your jacket in when it warms up, etc... I have a Revelate Tangle, and a Blackburn. Both are excellent.

BUT, I am 6'3" and ride 60 and 62cm bikes and have modified bottle cages to mount lower in the frame. If you ride smaller frame bikes, and you want to have water bottles, you are kind of out of luck. This is one small area of cycling in which being a big guy is an advantage.
 

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" I'm also only interested in easy to remove and add bags, so no racks or panniers for me. " The Arkel Seatpacker bags uses a light aluminum frame that mounts on the rails of the seat. It is very easy to install, I think this would be a great option. https://www.arkel-od.com/en/seatpacker-15-bikepacking-seat-bag.html
 

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imho Apidura makes the most attractive bikepacking bags nowadays. I have a few of theirs - nice and stiff and slick and built to a very very high standard. also a user friendly website and they ship it out very fast.

Wife and I like to do weekend getaways to the islands (airBnB!) - using bikepacking bags on our essentially race bikes.

Daily rides I like having a 'gas tank bag' instead of a seat bag. can keep a usb battery in there with gels and perhaps even repair items. They come in regular water resistant (with water tight zippers), or full waterproof

Wife uses the Timbuk2 frame and saddle packs - but they are very loose and floppy and dislikeable.

Apidura | Bikepacking // Randonneuring // Ultralight Cycle Touring

though I use a Blackburn frame bag - it is expandable! also very stiff and built to high standard

OUTPOST FRAME BAG LARGE

I also have a Moots rear pack with the included titanium rack (seen below). But I think it is inferior to just an Apidura saddle pack (seen above it in same pic). Will probably sell this Moots setup. It is modular - the top and bottom bags are separate and can use either one or both. But too small inside either one to fit much clothing.





Moots w Ti rack. In retrospect, it is much harder to pack and access than a simple saddle pack.



these Timbuk2 were the first bikepack bags we bought. In retrospect, should have got all Apidura! these are too floppy and not well made. However they do feature a bottle-hole so my wife can carry a bottle within the bag and access it while riding.

 

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I love frame bags (1/2 frame type) for just what you want to do. Like over night hotel trips, and commuting, picking up sandwiches to eat at a beautiful spot, put your jacket in when it warms up, etc... I have a Revelate Tangle, and a Blackburn. Both are excellent.

BUT, I am 6'3" and ride 60 and 62cm bikes and have modified bottle cages to mount lower in the frame. If you ride smaller frame bikes, and you want to have water bottles, you are kind of out of luck. This is one small area of cycling in which being a big guy is an advantage.
this is why the bikepack makers sell 'food bags' which also work as bottle holders when using frame bags.

I am tall too, so my bottle fit under my frame bag. However, I might switch to side-access cages in future to make it easier.

 

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I like the Arkel Randonneur Rack, which can accommodate a wide range of bags/items, and is CF seatpost safe.
 

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that is one cool looking bike, bag fenders, heck shifters too, combo!

Thing I wonder is .. what happened to those 1970s front bags we all used doing tours? The ones with a metal frame which sat on the bar/stem T, had bungies down to the axles, and usually had a big map pocket across the top? They were ubiquitous 35 years ago, and really great solution actually - easily accessed while riding. I tried searching for one last year. closest was this one: Design Your Own Handlebar Bag



course now this thread belongs in the packing/touring forum
 

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I just got a Jaand Mountain Wedge III for our tandem because my wife likes to carry a lot of clothes on cold days and was wanting to put the touring rack on. But this bag is pretty huge and I am happy with it. It would be even bigger if I could use the expansion feature, but my wife's seat isn't high enough and it would rub on the tire.

Mountain Wedge III
 

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that is one cool looking bike, bag fenders, heck shifters too, combo!

Thing I wonder is .. what happened to those 1970s front bags we all used doing tours? The ones with a metal frame which sat on the bar/stem T, had bungies down to the axles, and usually had a big map pocket across the top? They were ubiquitous 35 years ago, and really great solution actually - easily accessed while riding. I tried searching for one last year. closest was this one: Design Your Own Handlebar Bag



course now this thread belongs in the packing/touring forum
Thanks.

Have you looked here? They carry a few different brands and types of bags and may have what you're looking for.

https://www.bikebagshop.com/bike-handlebar-bags-e-75.html
 

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Disconano is a very nice, small, compact handlebar bag. I mostly ride day rides between 10 and 50 miles in good weather. I was looking for something that would give me a little more room than my seatbag (which is full with tools and spare tube). This bag holds my small pocket camera, my phone, my wallet, and a garage door opener with ease and has a very low, out of the way profile. My bike is a road bike with drops and it doesn't interfere with the extra brake levers or any cables.
 

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Handlebar bags are always superior to saddlebags as they allow you to easily access stuff while you're riding.
+1, but I've always avoided the type that hangs from loops, because they have a habit of flopping around if not tightly strapped down, plus they take up space on the bars. What I like are the type of handlebar bags that have a hard mount on the bars and stick out forward of them, leaving your entire bar open to your hands. The bag is quickly removeable. Cannondale used to sell a rather nice bag like this:
478055


This is an old R400 I own with just such a bag. This bag is more-or-less cylindrical, but I've also seen a rectangular profile version that's probably 50% larger. I'm not sure who still makes them, and since they mount to the bars with aluminum strap clamps, it might not be advisable to use on CF bars. Also, if you use a bar-mount light, it might block that, but a small riser mount would clear even the larger bag.

This size bag is large enough that I can carry a spare tubular, cleat covers, a light rain poncho, a multi-tool, cable lock, and a snack in it, as well as my wallet and phone. The front flap has a clear vinyl pocket for a ride map which you can use during club rides. This bag is over 30 years old, and it's still holding up.
 
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