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...if you want to mold the insoles, I guess more specific to the biking shoes....

you probably need a trainer to put the bike on (to support it).... and do one insole at a time

where you pop the warm insole into the shoe, clip in, and do a downstroke and hold your leg still for about a minute or 2, then repeat for the other insole.

but... haven't had issues with standing in them per SOLE's instructions when I first fitted them to my Specialized MTB Sport shoes, then used them in my cleats when I play softball (beer league) and football (trying to turn it into a beer league)... then my Northwave road bike shoes...
 

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Can anyone explain the purpose of insoles in the context of bicycle riding? I realize this comes off as sarcastic, but I assure you that I'm just a beginner.
 

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z3phrn said:
Can anyone explain the purpose of insoles in the context of bicycle riding? I realize this comes off as sarcastic, but I assure you that I'm just a beginner.
Primarily same purpose as an aftermarket insole on non-cycling shoes ... people's feet have different support requirement: low arch, high arch, etc etc.
 

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tom_h said:
Primarily same purpose as an aftermarket insole on non-cycling shoes ... people's feet have different support requirement: low arch, high arch, etc etc.
Exactly. You really notice on the long rides. Between insoles and cleat placement, there's a lot you can do in this area to increase efficiency and decrease pain.

I've been using Sidi shoes with Specialized insoles and a wedge to change the angle at which my foot comes down, as well as having my cleats fitted using many methods from the Specialized cleat fit system. The entire package has basically eliminated the pain I was having in my right knee and in my feet.
 

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I've tried a bunch over the years - yoursole, aline, shimano moldable shoes, specialized BG shoes, and esholes efit. The question of what would work best for you depends, I think, on your arch height. I have a high arch, and the only ones that provide the support I need are the esoles. They are also the most adjustable - they come with 4 different arch heights and two sized metatarsal pads, so allow you to do some experimenting to dial in a good fit. Without enough arch support I get pain in my big toes and some numbness. It's not a cleat issue or a knee tracking issue (I have specialized bg shoes with a forefoot tilt built into them). With the arch support my foot feels engaged with the shoe through the whole pedal revolution and has a good platform for the power phase of the stroke. I no longer feel my toes clenching since the foot is supported by the arch. The esole arch is the sturdiest of the bunch (it is semi-rigid). My rundown on the others:

heat moldable - not convinced this does much in a low volume, soft footbed. Doesn't raise the arch.

alines - way too much volume. maybe the newer ones are better.
 

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has anyone tried the dr scholls machine where you stand on it barefoot and it tell you what kind of insoles you should get?
 

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G8 Performance Cycling Insoles

I currently use the G8 2600 insoles myself and recommend them to all my Retul fit studio clients. They are new to market and build from the eSoles platform. They feature four different arch supports, each of which can be positioned / snapped into place forward / back and / or left / right. 28 unique arch support options in total. They also have a metatarsal pad.

g8performance.com

They are from Australia so shipping is expensive, but I like have an agreement with them for free shipping. Shoot me an message if you want to learn more.

velocraftcycling.com
 

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Giro insoles worked best for me. They come with three different levels of arch support pads. They're really thin in the heel too, which won't mess up the fit in the heel cup like the Specialized ones did for me.
 

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There are posts here that recommend certain products, but have no detail.
You recommend it because its comfortable or efficient or both?
I am looking for a thin, firm one to put in a touring shoe.
 

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In any shoe but especially in a shoe that you wear where a lot of force is transferred to your feet you want proper foot control and movement.

Regarding the heat moldable shoes how do they correct a problem with foot alignment or control such as say flat feet or highly flexible shoes? If for instance you flat feet when you put your foot into a heat moldable shoe would your foot still tend to flatten into the warm mold which would not be molded for flat feet when it cools?

Thanks.
 

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^ +1

Another Giro insoles fan here. Over the decades, have tried eSoles, Superfeet, Pearl Izumis system (much like Giros, but not as well executed and thought out design-wise), etc, etc, but nothing compares to the Giros. Giro and their shoes too, if you have normal to narrow feet---especially low volume feet (I've size 11 1/2 feet, by my foot volume is comparable to a size 8-9 American clodhopper, fastfood-induced Neanderthal-wide foot)---cannot be beat in the marketplace.

If you have fat feet needing a wide toe box, Giro insoles are not the best. But otherwise, if you are cyclist, you are doing yourself a disservice if you've never tried them and/or their shoes & insoles. I've turned many friends on over here to Giro. They previously were Sidi, Mavic, etc users because of their normal-to-low volume foot, and Sidi/Mavic make decent shoes and insoles. But upon putting Giros on, and setting their correct insole arch support, the grin that came across their collective face(s) was in no way not noticeable.

The common refrain from them is/was: I never knew the foot-to-shoe-to-pedal system could feel so powerfully as one, yet have that feeling last comfortably from the beginning of the ride to the end of the ride, no matter if it was a 30mi jaunt or a 100+mi death ride.
 

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Anyone tried the Solestar Kontrol?
 

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Anyone tried the Solestar Kontrol?
I've been using them for a couple of weeks and have been blown away by how good they are. They are unlike any other footbed I've used - and I've used a lot (Giro, esoles, etc.). It's hard to describe the feel, but for the first time I really feel like I am making excellent contact all along the medial length of my foot with solid support at the forefoot and heel - the triangular clamp they describe. I was skeptical a bit because they don't have an adjustable arch but it's such a different design that your foot finds the right spot on it.

here's a little test I did: seated climbing at high power (like 600+ watts) while trying to wiggle your toes. In other shoes, I felt like I needed to clench my toes to maintain power, but the "clamp" in the solestar really seems to work with the effect of feeling like my feet are very relaxed in the shoe - even at high power.

I'm using them in my bonts, which I had given up on because they are so stiff that they make any imperfection in foot/shoe contact apparent over time.
 

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I've been using them for a couple of weeks and have been blown away by how good they are. They are unlike any other footbed I've used - and I've used a lot (Giro, esoles, etc.). It's hard to describe the feel, but for the first time I really feel like I am making excellent contact all along the medial length of my foot with solid support at the forefoot and heel - the triangular clamp they describe. I was skeptical a bit because they don't have an adjustable arch but it's such a different design that your foot finds the right spot on it.

here's a little test I did: seated climbing at high power (like 600+ watts) while trying to wiggle your toes. In other shoes, I felt like I needed to clench my toes to maintain power, but the "clamp" in the solestar really seems to work with the effect of feeling like my feet are very relaxed in the shoe - even at high power.

I'm using them in my bonts, which I had given up on because they are so stiff that they make any imperfection in foot/shoe contact apparent over time.
Steve...Using esoles mainly because I have really high arches. Do you think these will support those of us with arches maybe a little outside the bell curve so-to-speak? I guess they might be worth a try to see for sure...any insight appreciated.
 
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