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Hello, Ive been thinking...(which is bad, already)
about getting ENVE 3.4 SES Powertap G3
which is on sale for ~$1800 + tub tires,
would it be better to get crank powermeter?

which offers more reliable data? how about vectors?
(I am using alu wheelset, so adding ENVE to my arsenal seems like a solid investment too)
 

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Honestly i would stay away from powertap power meter. While it is a very good product, it limits your wheel buying selection.

Crank based or pedal based comes in many different price sets.

Crank arm (stages) is going for about 400 to 500

Chanin ring or spider is about 700 to 1500 range.

Pedal is good for portability of bikes, but you are limited to a shoe type.

Garmin slashes Vector pricing & adds Shimano pedals, Edge 25/810/Varia Radar & PowerPod on Sale | DC Rainmaker

However vector cut its price to 1k for the vector 2 system, and you can now use Ultegra PD-6800 pedals now with the system.
 

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Hello, Ive been thinking...(which is bad, already)
about getting ENVE 3.4 SES Powertap G3
which is on sale for ~$1800 + tub tires,
would it be better to get crank powermeter?

which offers more reliable data? how about vectors?
(I am using alu wheelset, so adding ENVE to my arsenal seems like a solid investment too)
I have a Powertap wheelset. I went that route because I have multiple bikes and thought I could move the wheels around (although in reality I rarely do that). If I had just one bike I would probably go with a crank-based meter. The accuracy of the Powertap (+- 1.5%), Quark (+-1.5%), and SRM (+-.5%) are all pretty good.
 

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Honestly i would stay away from powertap power meter. While it is a very good product, it limits your wheel buying selection.
Not really. You could just build the hub to pretty much any rim you wanted.

Crank based or pedal based comes in many different price sets.
Crank is a good option if you have one bike. Or the same crank on multiple bikes.
I have 5 bikes with 5 different cranks :(
 

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Yea. And in their infinite wisdom they picked Speedplay pedals to work with. Which hardly anyone uses.

Pedal is good for portability of bikes, but you are limited to a shoe type.
Shoe types aren't that limited. Not nearly as bad as the shoe based where you're limited to a pedal type. And it doesn't work with 4 hole Speedplay shoes. So you're limited to pedal and shoe type.
 

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Yea. And in their infinite wisdom they picked Speedplay pedals to work with. Which hardly anyone uses.

Shoe types aren't that limited. Not nearly as bad as the shoe based where you're limited to a pedal type. And it doesn't work with 4 hole Speedplay shoes. So you're limited to pedal and shoe type.
Don't make me say powerpod LOL.

However dcrainmaker says it is good for the price.
PowerPod In-Depth Review | DC Rainmaker
 

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Powertap hubs are excellent power meters, and are the fastest to switch between bikes if the wheels are compatible. They do limit you to whatever rim the hub is laced into however you can also swap them into different rims by rebuilding the wheel.

Crank power meters are very good especially if they are staying on one bike as they allow flexibility with pedals and wheels. I would stay away from left only power meters like Stages though because of their inherent uncertainties. Pioneer, Quarq, power2max, Powertap C1, and the upcoming 4iii dual meter are good options. SRM if you have a large budget.

Pedal meters can be good as well and can be switched between bikes easily. They also are small so can be carried on travel if you rent a bike somewhere. In the past you were pretty much limited to look pedals but now the garmins can be used with SPD-SL. The garmins require a torque wrench for install and reports are that they can be finicky. Powertap pedals have a simpler install.

As you can see each location of power meter has it's own pros/cons and you will have to decide what is important to you to make your decision. DCRainmaker has a fitness product blog and is kind of the powermeter review guru. Here is his overview post on powermeters, he has detailed posts on most of the individual meters as well: The Power Meters Buyer?s Guide?2015 Edition | DC Rainmaker
 

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Hello, Ive been thinking...(which is bad, already)
about getting ENVE 3.4 SES Powertap G3
which is on sale for ~$1800 + tub tires,
would it be better to get crank powermeter?

which offers more reliable data? how about vectors?
(I am using alu wheelset, so adding ENVE to my arsenal seems like a solid investment too)
Make sure you know what you're getting into and are comfortable with it before getting tubular rims.

And by the way I wouldn't consider a power meter an "upgrade". It's an addition not an improvement on something existing. They are tools that you can either make use of or not. Calling it an "upgrade" is like calling a rack an upgrade. They're good if put them to use and a waste of money if you just have them for the sake of having them.
 

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Make sure you know what you're getting into and are comfortable with it before getting tubular rims.

And by the way I wouldn't consider a power meter an "upgrade". It's an addition not an improvement on something existing. They are tools that you can either make use of or not. Calling it an "upgrade" is like calling a rack an upgrade. They're good if put them to use and a waste of money if you just have them for the sake of having them.
+1 - don't do a tubular wheelset. I've raced a long time - tubulars were the only good race option back in the day, and I talked myself into a training set of tubular wheels a few years ago. It's a major pain and honestly I cannot tell the difference these days between clincher and tubular tires. Flatting is a pain and it's the end of your ride since you have to limp home hoping your spare doesn't flat. Installing tubulars is a pain and its messy (when a rim needs to be cleaned of old glue prepare yourself for a weekend project).

I"d recommend the powertap 30/50 amp wheelset if you want to go with a powertap hub. Rims are made by Reynolds, and the newer brake technology is very good. If you use multiple wheel/bike setups (like a disc on a tt bike), I'd get a crank option (but these days incompatible bb standards might make that difficult). I have a quarq elsa that has been flawless so far - newer temp compensation is much improved. Look around for a sale and you can get one for under 1k.
 

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I have two bikes with Powertap hubs (one on Enve 3.4s) and my latest bike (almost two years old) has Enve 3.4 discs and Garmin Vector pedals. On my latest bike, I wanted disc brakes and the Enve 3.4 discs were new and not offered with Powertap hubs yet, and I have Campy groupsets on all the bikes, so crank based power was really expensive, so the best remaining option was Garmin Vector pedals.

I think the Powertap hubs work fine, I had problems with my first one but not my second one. My only complaint was to do a firmware update on them required a Windows based computer, wouldn't run on a mac. Not sure if that is still the case. The Garmin pedals are wonderful, work fine, and I was already on Look pedals so that was not an issue.

I don't find much value in the additional data from the Garmin (left vs right), it doesn't influence my riding or training. I do love the Enve wheels, and think it was a great upgrade from the HED aluminum wheels I had been riding. I would let that drive your decision, frankly (without having an opinion on the tubular issue).
 

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got my 4iiii precision recently. Worked well. While heartrate is an indicator but I find it responding way to slow. The 4iiii is reasonably cheap enough. I'm considering getting another one for a second bike. I do have Ultegra cranks on both bikes but switching them minutes before I want to get out seems like a hassle.
 

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Power meter is only worth getting if you're going to analyze the data or pay a coach to do it.
How about power power based training with the likes of Trainerroad? I do most of my training indoors on a trainer using my power meter to match a power target profile. I've had tremendous results and improvement since training with power and following their training plans.

I'm also using a 4iiii power meter.
 

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I think the Powertap hubs work fine, I had problems with my first one but not my second one. My only complaint was to do a firmware update on them required a Windows based computer, wouldn't run on a mac. Not sure if that is still the case.
You can now update the firmware on a Mac, but the last time I tried you had to manually install Java 1.7 yourself instead of OS X's Java 1.6. The PowerTap app would just close without giving you a meaningful warning message if you didn't have the minimum version of Java. I'm not sure if this is still the case.
 

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A powertap was my first ever powermeter. Then I got two G3s later on, along with an SRM, a Power2Max, and a Powertap C1.

I use the C1 now. Had to buy a 110 10 speed crank for it but works perfectly with 11 speed.

G3s hubs just don't last long enough for my riding. I had two different warranties. Customer service is great, but the guy told me out right I ride too much/hard for the wheels (breaking spokes and rim).

Built up to Enves would more than likely solve that problem, of course (I was using the stock rim). Still don't think the hub is the most robust or durable thing, but maybe you'll have better luck.

For the money, though, I'd just go with a crank system and go another direction with wheels.
 

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The problem with a Powertap is that you want to use it all the time. If you ride a lot and/or are hard on wheels you may have to do a lot of wheel maintenance. My PT's been retired to my rain bike but when I used it all the time I had to get the wheel rebuilt every 9 months or so. I'm not heavy or rough on bikes but I am hard on rear wheels. I do a lot of climbing, much of it steep, and stand a lot. That coupled with PT's poor (at the time) flange geometry and some sub-optimal rim choices (Mavic) resulted in wheels dying with broken spokes or cracked rims.

I also had some bearings die but that's to be expected especially if you ride in the wet and they were easy to replace myself.

Eventually I decided to do my own wheel builds using better rims. And then I put a Quark on my race bike so I could give the poor PT wheel some rest.
 

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The problem with a Powertap is that you want to use it all the time. If you ride a lot and/or are hard on wheels you may have to do a lot of wheel maintenance. My PT's been retired to my rain bike but when I used it all the time I had to get the wheel rebuilt every 9 months or so. I'm not heavy or rough on bikes but I am hard on rear wheels. I do a lot of climbing, much of it steep, and stand a lot. That coupled with PT's poor (at the time) flange geometry and some sub-optimal rim choices (Mavic) resulted in wheels dying with broken spokes or cracked rims.

I also had some bearings die but that's to be expected especially if you ride in the wet and they were easy to replace myself.

Eventually I decided to do my own wheel builds using better rims. And then I put a Quark on my race bike so I could give the poor PT wheel some rest.
Which powertap did you have? The G3 was supposed to be a lot better in terms of weight and flange geometry.
 
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