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Hi, I got a 17.8 lb Focus bike and am disturbed by the weight... What would be the best way to make it lighter and faster (wheels, components, other stuff)? The wheels weigh 1900 g total.. And how noticeable is a few (1-2) extra pounds on your bike while climbing?
 

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Needs a new engine.
 

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wheels then possibly the crankset (depending on what crankset is on there now). after that, you can go weight weenie on lots of things--seat post, bars, brakes, all wth lesser returns per dollar output.

if you want to climb better, swap the wheels first. then you'll have no excuse when you realize that you need to really work harder developing your engine and technique and becoming a better climber.
 

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definitely wheels first. this upgrade is one you can immediately feel.

check the saddle too. you'll be surprised at how much some stock saddles weigh.

cockpit (stem, bars, seatpost) - worth looking into but i'd do this last

group - usually worth doing as well.
 

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Cranky Old Bastard
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What material is your frame made of?
What price range is the bike in? What components?
How much are you willing to spend?

The current weight isn't horrible and it is likely that you've already got fairly light components so it probably won't be cheap to get it much lighter.

If the 1900g figure for the wheels is bare; without cassette and tires/tubes, then yes you can take off quite a bit there without spending a fortune, and that weight loss would make the most difference in improving the overall performance of the bike.
But how much do you weigh? You shouldn't go with superlight wheels if you're a big guy.

The crankset is usually the next thing to check. But if you've already got newer Ultegra, for example, it may cost hundreds of dollars to save a few ounces.
After that it can get really expensive to take off fairly small amounts of weight: $200+ carbon handlebars might save 100g. $100 carbon seatpost might save another 100g. $150 saddle might remove a few ounces, etc.

I've got a thread going on how I've taken over 5 pounds off an entry-level Trek: http://forums.roadbikereview.com/sa...self-indulgent-weight-loss-thread-303635.html
but I've upgraded everything except the frame, fork and headset and spent right around the original purchase price of the bike to do it.
 

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What material is your frame made of?
What price range is the bike in? What components?
How much are you willing to spend?

The current weight isn't horrible and it is likely that you've already got fairly light components so it probably won't be cheap to get it much lighter.

If the 1900g figure for the wheels is bare; without cassette and tires/tubes, then yes you can take off quite a bit there without spending a fortune, and that weight loss would make the most difference in improving the overall performance of the bike.
But how much do you weigh? You shouldn't go with superlight wheels if you're a big guy.

The crankset is usually the next thing to check. But if you've already got newer Ultegra, for example, it may cost hundreds of dollars to save a few ounces.
After that it can get really expensive to take off fairly small amounts of weight: $200+ carbon handlebars might save 100g. $100 carbon seatpost might save another 100g. $150 saddle might remove a few ounces, etc.

I've got a thread going on how I've taken over 5 pounds off an entry-level Trek: http://forums.roadbikereview.com/sa...self-indulgent-weight-loss-thread-303635.html
but I've upgraded everything except the frame, fork and headset and spent right around the original purchase price of the bike to do it.
No offense, but I'm not sure this is a rational approach... Doubling the cost of an entry level bike to make it lighter could have gotten you a pretty damn light bike with a higher quality frame.

I agree that wheels could make the bike lighter for the least amount of g/$. The biggest thing to understand though, is that lighter and faster do not necessarily go hand in hand.

That being said, go for some wheels. Just make sure you're looking for a quality wheel that'll ride nicely and not just the lightest wheel you can find. The ride quality will do alot more for you than just pure weight reduction. After that, I'd call it quits. You'll spend alot of money to drop grams in small amounts that won't really be worth it.

What will be worth it and won't cost you any more than you've spent at this point, is ride the crap out of what you have. I can say with nearly 100% certainty riding alot more will make you faster. Plus, crushing someone on a 15lb SWorks This and That or a Cannondale EVO Hi-Dollar or a Trek Schleck edition Quittin' Time Madone on an 18lb mid level bike in the hills is always a nice feeling.

NOTE: I don't hate nice bikes... Just throwing an example of where the machine doesn't matter out there. :p
 

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This.

I was talking bike weight with a long time rider and his reply was "I seriously doubt you'll shed 10 lbs from a 18 lb bike...but you can shed 10 lbs from your body."

I've tried to take that to heart and maintain my weight...
Agree. I do not want unnecessary weight on the bike but better eating habits would help me more than my new wheels will.
 

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Hi, I got a 17.8 lb Focus bike and am disturbed by the weight... What would be the best way to make it lighter and faster (wheels, components, other stuff)? The wheels weigh 1900 g total.. And how noticeable is a few (1-2) extra pounds on your bike while climbing?
You should try riding my hardtail MTB.... then you'll be happy with the 17.8 lbs of your Focus road bike.

If you're that disturbed by weight.... I hope you don't have any provisions that hold water for hydration, a seat bag for tubes and such....... all those should go into your jersey pockets
 
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how noticeable is a few (1-2) extra pounds on your bike while climbing?
Pretty much not. At all.

Just a few years ago an 18-pound bike was considered very light. It still is very light, in truth. A full water bottle weighs 2 pounds.
 

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Pitts Pilot
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Best way to make it lighter is by replacing parts with ones that are lighter than the current ones. This will not make it any faster. Best way to make it faster is to pedal faster (in the same gear or a taller one.) This may require training.

Lighter wheels do make the bike "feel" different, but the gain in speed compared to losing weight elsewhere is not particularly significant.
 

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Disagree-- I just switched from my 1430g alloy clinchers to my 990g carbon tubulars and boy did I feel a difference.
That may well be true. But unless you've clocked yourself up a certain climb, you really don't know if it made much of a difference in terms of time.

Just as a reference: On a 7.5 mile climb with an average gradient of 7%, a few short 16% sections and an elevation gain of 2,700 feet, a 1-pound reduction would make you 15 seconds faster. Note that this one pound can come off anywhere—bike, rider, accessories. It doesn't even matter if it's off the wheels or not.
 

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Cranky Old Bastard
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No offense, but I'm not sure this is a rational approach... Doubling the cost of an entry level bike to make it lighter could have gotten you a pretty damn light bike with a higher quality frame.
You're absolutely right and no I didn't take offense, thanks. :D

I wrote of it to point out that it is relatively easy to get carried away and build a bike that isn't as good as what you could have bought new if you had spent that amount of money in the first place.

As I've explained in my thread, I have done this before and seen the result. The only way I could justify the expense this time is by buying another frame and fork and transferring all the take-off parts to build a second bike.
 

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thru the addition of lighter wheels, saddle, pedals I just reduced the weight of a bike by over 2 lbs.

the effect is noticeable when I pick it up, but much less so when I ride it.

but, I have no regrets over my choices...it makes me want to ride it more.
 

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Speed will come from you, not the bike.
Start training and then show the weenies on their 13lbs bikes who's boss :D

With that said, if you really want to spend money on making the bike lighter, tell us which Focus model you have or what components you have on it so we can guide you better.
1900g wheels may not be that heavy if they're really deep.
 

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What would be the best way to make it lighter
Best way & cheapest way.... buy a new bike! If you really want to lighten up your bike you have to analyze every component and replace many of them at just a few gram savings each.
Your wheels are on the heavy side. If you really wanted to, it would be the best bang for your buck. You can get some lighter wheels without spending too much. Although you didn't say how heavy you are. If you're a clydsedale, you may need the beefy wheels

Best way to make bike faster
Forget all the saving weight BS! You're wasting time and money. Tune up the engine. Reduce the weight of the engine. Ride more. Ride harder.

Those that say they "feel" instant savings with their new lighter components are feeling the placebo effect. They haven't done any proofing to see that they're not going any faster.

The last few weeks I've been doing hill repeats on top of my regular riding. One hill (1mi long) up and down 3 times as fast as I can.
Week #2 was 10sec faster/hill than week #1 (30sec) overall.
Week #3 was 20sec faster/hill than week #2 (60sec) overall.

In 3 weeks I've gotten 90sec faster over a 6mi course. If you think you can buy that kind of speed increase with lighter components, I've got a bridge to sell you.
 
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