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When I'm all hot and sweaty a nice cold drink is great. However, for hydration and endurance reasons, does it matter what temperature your drink is? Obviously you don't want something too hot or too cold, but within reason, does it make a difference?
 

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Theories

CBar said:
When I'm all hot and sweaty a nice cold drink is great. However, for hydration and endurance reasons, does it matter what temperature your drink is? Obviously you don't want something too hot or too cold, but within reason, does it make a difference?
Studies have shown that cooler liquids move out of the stomach faster than warm liquids. Some will caution you about ice cold liquids, but I think this is a highly individual thing. It's never caused me a problem. The temperature of the liquids is a secondary effect compared to getting/not getting liquids.
 

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Kerry Irons said:
Studies have shown that cooler liquids move out of the stomach faster than warm liquids. Some will caution you about ice cold liquids, but I think this is a highly individual thing. It's never caused me a problem. The temperature of the liquids is a secondary effect compared to getting/not getting liquids.

Pouring a warm bottle of water that tastes nasty on your head feels like ICE cold when you are working it hard.
 

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Fluid temperature in the stomach?

Kerry Irons said:
Studies have shown that cooler liquids move out of the stomach faster than warm liquids. Some will caution you about ice cold liquids, but I think this is a highly individual thing. It's never caused me a problem. The temperature of the liquids is a secondary effect compared to getting/not getting liquids.
Just how long do consumed liquids stay warm or cool? It seems to me that most liquids equilibriate to body temperature quickly, if not in seconds, then in no more than a minute or so. Could those extra seconds that a liquid remains cool really affect the gross movement out of the stomach?
 

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CBar said:
Obviously you don't want something too hot or too cold, but within reason, does it make a difference?
One way it might make a difference, and a way I don't think you were asking about, would be whether a too-hot drink becomes so unappealing that the athlete doesn't hydrate properly.

I think I probably fall victim to this problem, a little bit. On unsupported rides up to 35-40 miles I carry two bottles; on rides of 50-80 miles I carry four. By the time I'm sucking on that third and especially that fourth bottle, the contents are pretty tepid, and I probably am subconsciously resisting drinking as much as I should be.
 

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Allez Rouge said:
By the time I'm sucking on that third and especially that fourth bottle, the contents are pretty tepid, and I probably am subconsciously resisting drinking as much as I should be.
I tend not to drink cold drinks. Water at room temp, no ice, the occaisional soda at room temp, no ice. Ambient temp drinks suck down just fine for me.

beer = cold, tho, so I do find it hard to suck down warm beers on my training rides, but that's probably beneficial.:D
 

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I have always believed we need to try and match our internal temp with tour external: So, ice cold drafts in Winter, good expresso in the summer...
LOL...
 

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Cool math

Mark McM said:
Just how long do consumed liquids stay warm or cool? It seems to me that most liquids equilibriate to body temperature quickly, if not in seconds, then in no more than a minute or so. Could those extra seconds that a liquid remains cool really affect the gross movement out of the stomach?
Pretty hard to calculate the heat transfer coefficient inside the stomach, but a substantial cold drink would not warm up in seconds. If you take an extreme case of 8 oz at 40F, then the body would have to supply 7.5 (food) calories to warm the water to body temp. That's 45 seconds of calorie production at serious exercise levels, but for sure all the heat you're generating wouldn't go to the stomach. If you assume (hey, why not?) that 10% of your calorie production went to warm the water, then it's 7.5 minutes to warm up the water. Obviously, there would be immediate heat transfer from the surrounding tissues, so all of this is just a guess. All I'm doing is repeating the results of some study, so perhaps it has something to do with the cooler liquids conditioning the stomach lining or causing the stomach to discharge faster to the small intestine, or perhaps these were poor studies that didn't really represent real-world conditions.
 

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CBar said:
When I'm all hot and sweaty a nice cold drink is great. However, for hydration and endurance reasons, does it matter what temperature your drink is? Obviously you don't want something too hot or too cold, but within reason, does it make a difference?
Hmmm. I never put ice or anything cold in my system during a race. Supposedly your body spends energy warming cold liquids up before they can get moved around-- and energy is one of the last things you want to waste during a race.

To tell you the truth, I heard that once when I was in high school by one of my cycling coaches. I never really checked it out, but I figure I don't have much to lose otherwise.

*shrug*
 
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