Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 20 of 77 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,474 Posts
No idea what these numbers mean, and I can tell you that Bianchi will be of no help either. Don't even bother contacting them. They really don't know.

I guess by "edge of tubing" you mean the edges of the lugs. Think twice about re-doing the edging. You need an extremely steady hand, a perfectly-shaped professional-quality brush, the proper paint in the exact right consistency and lots of freehand painting experience. The reason you really do need all this is that striped lugs really, really look like crap unless they're done perfectly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I agree it only looks good if it's perfect. Perfect is not easy.

It seems that the Binachi records are about the same as the Ferrari records. It has to be an Italian thing. I know Ferrari used to change the serial numbers on his cars to avoid taxes back in the 50's.

Last wek I ended up having to drill the seat post out. We tried everything known to man. In the end only a big drill got the job done.

Richard Newton
 

·
Bianchi-Campagnolo
Joined
·
3,902 Posts
Could you show a picture of the complete tubing sticker? My guess is Columbus Nemo, which was a particularly thin walled steel, for light frames for light riders.
 

·
Boobies!
Joined
·
8,173 Posts
View attachment 282346

This is more than just a restoration. It's art. It's a 1952 Bianchi Zaffiro single speed. The wood handle bar grips are not original to the bike.
That's beautiful

The tubing on your project bike is Dedacciai Zero Tre--one of a series from them. Zero Tre was third down the line in Dedacciai's competition tubing sets - Zero was top, Zero Uno second and Zero Tre third--it is a good third generation CrMo steel. Good stuff!

Is the downtube slightly ovalized? If so it might be the Trofeo model....

Are your plans to put a modern group on it, or try to recreate the bike as it was?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
There's no question about it being a Trofeo.

View attachment 282357

It's rough but all the parts are there. That's why I'm going to restore it. At least restore it as much as possible. I've done a number of cars over the years. This bike is a little too rough to leave it as it currently exists. One the other hand I'm not sure I want to do a show quality restoration. It would be nice to have something like the '52 I posted earlier though.

One of the interesting things is that the bike is silver. That's the original color. Do I paint it silver or do the green thing? The good part is I don't have to decide that for a while.

Richard
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
There are a couple of rules when it comes to restoring a car. I think they may apply to bikes as well. First, before you start add up the cost of everything you might possibly need. Then multiply that amount by two. You’ll be close to what the ultimate cost might be.

Next you should try to estimate the amount of time this project is going to take. Again, be generous. Now multiply that number by four and you might be close.

Up to this point I have about 4 hours in just getting the seat post out of the frame. I’ve also spent $245 on a bike that cost me $120. Oh well.

I've started a blog on this project that might interest some folks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
My seat arrived.
It's a San Marco Rolls saddle. They call it black rhino leather. I got it from an Amazon.com affiliate called We Keep You Cycling. It was $67.32 with free shipping and no sales tax.

The interesting thing is if I had purchased this saddle from their own web side it would have cost $89.99. They sell things on Amazon.com cheaper than they do on their own web site.

I thought about a Brooks saddle but it is a Bianchi bike. Best to keep it Italian. I like to stay with a theme.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I actually rode this bike today. I have no gears but at least I managed to get the brakes adjusted. That's progress.

I've spent $462 on this bike at this point. I'm over the value of the bike but that happens with any restoration. No one ever said restorations are an investment. Here's a breakdown of my costs.

Richard Newton
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I'm riding it. It has no gears but that's not a big deal right now. I live in Florida.

View attachment 283171

I don't think I'll get the gears working until after the paint. btw - This is one of the rarer silver bikes. Bianchi only seems to have offered the silver in 1998. That means I'm going to keep the silver paint.

Richard Newton
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,123 Posts
not sure this is really a 'rare' bike, but if you like it, keep working on it.

you could improve things by adjusting the handlebars properly (they're over-rotated) and putting on some new bar tape.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
It's far from being rare. It's still fun though.

I'll try moving the bars. The tape is sort of pathetic right now. I'm going to hold off on this for a while. I may try to get the gears working though. The next big step will be taking everything apart for painting.

A friend of mine called Bianchi the Ferrari of bikes. If indeed that's the case I own the Bianchi 308 - the bottom of the product line.

Richard Newton
 
1 - 20 of 77 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top