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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My LBS had a Surly Steamroller built for $600. I'm sure not that great of components, but the frame is solid. You could buy the frame at Universal Cycles for ~$350 shipped and build up from there.

I ride a SS 29er, too. You'll love SS roadies.
 

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Slow but enthusiastic!
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Hi all, I'm looking to get into road biking and need some advice. A little background first:

I'm primarily a mountain biker. I tried to build a road bike with a mtb frame, 1.75" tires, 44x15 tensioned with a chopped derailleur. I rode it around town and it was ok as a curb jumper. But a real road ride with a friend showed me that it is only holding me back and making me work way harder than I need to.

I did really like the peace and relaxation of a road ride though. Nothing at all like the intervals and technical riding on the dirt/rocks. I'm an SS MTBer and see no reason not to carry that over to the roadie world. With that out of the way:

I'm looking for cheap, reliable and reasonably light as I can expect for my price range. I rode a specialized langster at a LBS. It was ok but felt a little cheap and the brakes were crap. I looked at the IRO mark V online and that looks promising.

Anything else in the $600-$1000 range I should be looking at? Used is ok as well.
 

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Slow but enthusiastic!
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That brings up another Q. I know mtb components, but not road. What is low end, middle and high end? If I decide to buy a frame can I expect decent midrange components?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
My LBS can build up a Surly to your spec. For ~$1k, you should have decent components on there. For Shimano, it goes Alivio, Tiagra, 105, Ultegra and Dura-Ace (Dura-Ace is like XTR). There are a few lines below Alivio, but I wouldn't wander in that arena. For other components, well, you'll just have to ask as there are a ton of them.
 

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vexatious enigma
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Most people here wont wander below 105 (equivilent of centaur for Campy, and Sram force (I think, not so sure about Sram)) for componentry, and widely consider anything below to be junk. I think that youll want a pretty tough bottom bracket seeing as it will take some good torture so I wouldn't skimp on that; same as the cranks. Otherwise just get a decent wheelset (Mavic open pros are very nice wheels at a cheap price and it's what Ill be going with on my buildup.) With your budget you can afford a good build; just do your research and youll get some nice parts for your money.
 

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Awsome, thanks guys. I'll look into the components, that'll give me something to geek out on. As for frames, my MTB is steel and I most alu hardtails have a harsh ride. I assume this holds true for road as well, maybe moreso with rigid forks correct?
 

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How about a Crosscheck? It has semi horz. dropouts and can be easily SSed without any chain tensioner doodads. You can run fat tires and hit the dirt.
Use a 9 speed cassette hub with spacers and you can easily convert it to geared.
I ride a Motobecane Phantom Uno and it works very well on the road.
 

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I'd rather have a pure road bike. If I want to ride dirt I'll take my MTB. In my 4+ years in vegas I've never seen a cross bike on the trails, it would be suicide. Its extremely rugged and rocky here, here is an average trail.

 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Actually, the cross check will take 45 tires, so it could handle that. I'm in the Rockies, too, and although I haven't seen a cross bike on the trails, I ride fully rigid, so I know it can be done. And still be fun.

But you are correct--IMO, I don't like getting a bike that is an "all-arounder" bike. I'd rather have one for each different purpose. I still think you should go with a Surly Steamroller from UC. Solid frames.
 

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But even with 45s you've now created a fully rigid SS mountain bike with skinny tires, narrow bars and geometry that might be a bit off for technical riding. And you've created a road bike with tires way too big and gearing that will spin out at 15mph. Too many compromises considering I already have a ride with 2.25" knobbies, 32/18 gearing, wide bars and a suspension fork. :D

I will look into the steamroller. Jenson has them on sale but they're in track bike form. I might want to try a fixie in the future but for now I want brakes and the ability to coast.

palu said:
Actually, the cross check will take 45 tires, so it could handle that. I'm in the Rockies, too, and although I haven't seen a cross bike on the trails, I ride fully rigid, so I know it can be done. And still be fun.

But you are correct--IMO, I don't like getting a bike that is an "all-arounder" bike. I'd rather have one for each different purpose. I still think you should go with a Surly Steamroller from UC. Solid frames.
 

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big_slacker said:
But even with 45s you've now created a fully rigid SS mountain bike with skinny tires, narrow bars and geometry that might be a bit off for technical riding. And you've created a road bike with tires way too big and gearing that will spin out at 15mph. Too many compromises considering I already have a ride with 2.25" knobbies, 32/18 gearing, wide bars and a suspension fork. :D

I will look into the steamroller. Jenson has them on sale but they're in track bike form. I might want to try a fixie in the future but for now I want brakes and the ability to coast.


the complete 07/red is spec'ed w/ a flip-flop hub, but there are no rear cable guides
 

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1K is a pretty good budget for a SS if a little smart shopping is done.

Since you don't need some of the bigger ticket items of a geared road bike like brake/shifters, cassettes, derailleurs, etc... that money could go towards a few pretty good components on a number of good priced frames of your choice.

If it were my money,:p .... I would spec out something like a Phil Wood BB and hubs, a mid priced track crank and not worry about them for a very long time. That is the way I think...I put a lot of consideration in good components that can be moved if you decide to upgrade the frame. If you end up going a little over budget, that will be nothing over the life span of those components.

I like many here, bought one of the Bike Direct offerings, but sacrificed on a (really) great components package. Solid wheels built with high end hubs can make a big difference on how any bike will ride...regarless of frame material, etc. The same goes for a good crank and BB...it will take some of that "crappy" cheap feeling away from what may be a decent frame.

Something to consider if it is your primary road bike. Good luck and have fun.:thumbsup:
 
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