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Bike Nashbar has a nasty habit of charging SALES TAX on shipping charges! I live in California where shipping is EXEMPT from sales tax. I have written twice to the Bike Nasbhar folks and gotten absolutely no response. They are RIPPING OFF customers big time. I am not aware of any state in the U.S. which taxes shipping charges.

On an order where the product total was $76.87 I should have been charged 7.25% or $5.57. Instead I was charged $6.17, a full 10.8% more than should have been.

Please check your invoice and let me know what state you live in and how much you have been overcharged. Maybe, if the people there read posts (which I sincerely doubt) we can get them to change their method so that they don't overcharge their own customers. As a retiree I cannot afford to enrich anyone more than they deserve.

Finally, it is impossible to communicate with them as they only give a customer service address and phone number. I am aware that Bike Nashbar and Performance and one other company are now under a single owner, but try and find out who the key officers are and you will hit a dead end.

Thanks for your help

Dave
Murrieta CA
 

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beecnul8r said:
Bike Nashbar has a nasty habit of charging SALES TAX on shipping charges! I live in California where shipping is EXEMPT from sales tax. I have written twice to the Bike Nasbhar folks and gotten absolutely no response. They are RIPPING OFF customers big time. I am not aware of any state in the U.S. which taxes shipping charges.

On an order where the product total was $76.87 I should have been charged 7.25% or $5.57. Instead I was charged $6.17, a full 10.8% more than should have been.

Please check your invoice and let me know what state you live in and how much you have been overcharged. Maybe, if the people there read posts (which I sincerely doubt) we can get them to change their method so that they don't overcharge their own customers. As a retiree I cannot afford to enrich anyone more than they deserve.

Finally, it is impossible to communicate with them as they only give a customer service address and phone number. I am aware that Bike Nashbar and Performance and one other company are now under a single owner, but try and find out who the key officers are and you will hit a dead end.

Thanks for your help

Dave
Murrieta CA
Wrong forum, bro.
 

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firstrax said:
<MARQUEE bgcolor ="#CCCCCC" loop= "-1" scrollamount= "4" width= "20%">PIE PIE PIE PIE </MARQUEE>
Holy crap. Can you let me know HTML?

I wanna try...


<MARQUEE bgcolor ="#CCCCCC" loop= "-1" scrollamount= "4" width= "20%"> J's Mom is a hottie. </MARQUEE>
 

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Dave Hickey said:
Bike Nashbar and Supergo.com are now merged. If you order shipped from a California warehouse, you owe sales tax.
He's saying he paid tax on the shipping charges, which shouldn't have been the case.
 

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Here is the link to the IRS. This is a federal tax.

http://www.irs.gov/businesses/page/0,,id=7002,00.html#Chap10

IRC section 4271 imposes a tax on amounts paid for taxable transportation of property by air, but only if they are paid to a person engaged in the business of transporting property by air for the person. (Profit is not a motive).
IRC section 4271 imposes a 6.25 percent tax on property being transported within the United States and its boundaries. The tax applies to amounts paid to an air carrier by a freight forwarder or express company for the transportation of property by air.

The amount paid includes actual amounts paid for the flights plus any payments made for crew expenses such as pilot meals, lodging, waiting time, deadhead time (empty plane returning to base), sales taxes, landing fees, parking, and any other amounts related to the charter flight.

The user tax on air transportation of property imposed by IRC section 4271 applies to all users. It is reported on Form 720, and deposit requirements apply.

Liability for Tax
IRC section 4271(a) provides that the tax applies only to amounts paid to persons engaged in the business of transporting property by air for compensation.
The term "property" does not include excess baggage accompanying a passenger traveling on an aircraft operated on an established line.

The term "transportation" includes layover or waiting time and movement of the aircraft in deadhead service.

The term "taxable transportation" is defined in IRC section 4272 as transportation by air that begins and ends in the United States.

If the payment is made outside the United States and no tax is collected, then the person to whom the property was delivered is liable for the tax.

The tax does not apply to amounts paid for transportation partially or entirely by air that (1) begins in the United States and ends outside the United States or (2) begins outside the United States and ends in the United States.

The domestic portion of an international cargo flight is not taxable.

For payments made outside the United States, collection of the tax is to be done by the person furnishing the last segment of the air transportation.

The tax on transportation of property by air does not apply to amounts charged for the non-U.S. portion of a flight from the continental United States to Alaska on either a nonstop flight or a flight with a scheduled stopover in Canada beyond the 225-mile zone. However, if the flight includes a scheduled stopover within the 225-mile zone, only the portion of the flight from the stopover point to the Alaskan border can be excluded from the application of the tax. (Rev. Rul. 75-27)
 

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The answer is Nashbar, Performance, Supergo (They are all one company) must charge sales tax if they have a brick and mortar store in your state. They do the same to me in Md. It kinda unsweetens the deal a bit.


Since you got the answer in the Lounge you owe everyone a round.
 

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Tax Code evil.

Dave Hickey said:
Here is the link to the IRS. This is a federal tax.

http://www.irs.gov/businesses/page/0,,id=7002,00.html#Chap10

IRC section 4271 imposes a tax on amounts paid for taxable transportation of property by air, but only if they are paid to a person engaged in the business of transporting property by air for the person. (Profit is not a motive).
IRC section 4271 imposes a 6.25 percent tax on property being transported within the United States and its boundaries. The tax applies to amounts paid to an air carrier by a freight forwarder or express company for the transportation of property by air.

The amount paid includes actual amounts paid for the flights plus any payments made for crew expenses such as pilot meals, lodging, waiting time, deadhead time (empty plane returning to base), sales taxes, landing fees, parking, and any other amounts related to the charter flight.

The user tax on air transportation of property imposed by IRC section 4271 applies to all users. It is reported on Form 720, and deposit requirements apply.

Liability for Tax
IRC section 4271(a) provides that the tax applies only to amounts paid to persons engaged in the business of transporting property by air for compensation.
The term "property" does not include excess baggage accompanying a passenger traveling on an aircraft operated on an established line.

The term "transportation" includes layover or waiting time and movement of the aircraft in deadhead service.

The term "taxable transportation" is defined in IRC section 4272 as transportation by air that begins and ends in the United States.

If the payment is made outside the United States and no tax is collected, then the person to whom the property was delivered is liable for the tax.

The tax does not apply to amounts paid for transportation partially or entirely by air that (1) begins in the United States and ends outside the United States or (2) begins outside the United States and ends in the United States.

The domestic portion of an international cargo flight is not taxable.

For payments made outside the United States, collection of the tax is to be done by the person furnishing the last segment of the air transportation.

The tax on transportation of property by air does not apply to amounts charged for the non-U.S. portion of a flight from the continental United States to Alaska on either a nonstop flight or a flight with a scheduled stopover in Canada beyond the 225-mile zone. However, if the flight includes a scheduled stopover within the 225-mile zone, only the portion of the flight from the stopover point to the Alaskan border can be excluded from the application of the tax. (Rev. Rul. 75-27)
 

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beecnul8r said:
As a retiree I cannot afford to enrich anyone more than they deserve.

Finally, it is impossible to communicate with them as they only give a customer service address and phone number. I am aware that Bike Nashbar and Performance and one other company are now under a single owner, but try and find out who the key officers are and you will hit a dead end.
Yeah, us non-retired people have all the money in the world to blow! Put away the calculator and ride your bike.

BTW, what is it with seniors thinking they need to talk to the executive committee to solve their ills?

Sorry to interrupt the Loungers, I just happened to stumble in.
 

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bigrider said:
The answer is Nashbar, Performance, Supergo (They are all one company) must charge sales tax if they have a brick and mortar store in your state. They do the same to me in Md. It kinda unsweetens the deal a bit.


Since you got the answer in the Lounge you owe everyone a round.
That doesn't answer his question whether the shipping should be taxed as well...
 

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Scotty2Hotty said:
That doesn't answer his question whether the shipping should be taxed as well...
I guess at this point we need exact shipping details. Priority Mail, 2nd day air, ect.

I just checked two of my old Nashbar receipts. One ground and one US mail. No tax charged on either.
 
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