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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Recently was in a car-bike accident, as my bikes frame/wheels were carbon fiber the damage assessment totaled out my bike. It is assumed the frame and wheels are no longer safe to ride as it was a really hard impact. The insurance company of the person who hit me paid the replacement cost of the bike, which was awesome but they also affirmed that they did not need to take possession of the bike after paying out. Now I have the check for the repacement and the old bike, is it technically legal to strip parts off the old one? What about stripping off and selling parts that I don't need(this sounds especially iffy to me)? If anyone has any experience with this it would be great. It's a Bianchi Infinito CV '14 with full dura ace, carbon wheels laced with a powertap so I don't exactly feel like throwing it all up on the wall..
 

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It is assumed the frame and wheels are no longer safe to ride as it was a really hard impact. What about stripping off and selling parts that I don't need(this sounds especially iffy to me)? If anyone has any experience with this it would be great. It's a Bianchi Infinito CV '14 with full dura ace, carbon wheels

it sort of sounds like the bike isn't safe to ride and you want to sell what may be unsafe components. If that's correct then.... DON'T
 

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Banned Sock Puppet
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I wouldn't sell any of the parts that I wouldn't re-use myself. Ask yourself, would you let your mother ride the bike those parts are on?

Frame, fork, wheels, headset, seatpost, stem, handlebars are parts that if they fail, it could be a life or death situation. Don't go there regardless of their condition. Big liability issue if anything happens to buyer.

Parts like derailleurs, cassette, crankset, bottom bracket I see no harm in selling as long as they are working and aren't damaged.
 

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If they are not asking for it you are fine keeping or selling as long as you are honest about condition including the accident.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G935A using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I wouldn't sell any of the parts that I wouldn't re-use myself. Ask yourself, would you let your mother ride the bike those parts are on?

Frame, fork, wheels, headset, seatpost, stem, handlebars are parts that if they fail, it could be a life or death situation. Don't go there regardless of their condition. Big liability issue if anything happens to buyer.

Parts like derailleurs, cassette, crankset, bottom bracket I see no harm in selling as long as they are working and aren't damaged.
This is the direction I was leaning as well, but with the insurance company cutting me a check it isn't immediately clear if it was legal to even use the parts myself.. They did after all pay for the cost of these parts.
 

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Banned Sock Puppet
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This is the direction I was leaning as well, but with the insurance company cutting me a check it isn't immediately clear if it was legal to even use the parts myself.. They did after all pay for the cost of these parts.

As far as cars go, when an insurance company "totals" a car, they confiscate the car. You are not allowed to even buy it back from them at scrap value and fix it. They do this to prevent fraud.

As far as bikes are concerned, I am guessing it is more trouble than it's worth for an insurance company to confiscate a bike considering that a damage payout will usually be much less than on a car.

I am guessing technically, it might still be considered insurance fraud, but there really isn't any way of tracking bike parts down. Also consider that the non salvageable parts of a bike can simply be thrown out on garbage or bulk collection day. A car is registered and has to be disposed of "publicly".
 

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If they didn't ask for the bike back, it's yours to do with as you wish. Obviously they didn't ask you if every nut and bolt on the bike was ruined. They know that's not the case. It's not worth their effort to itemize every penny. And they know a replacement bike is cheaper in the long run than trying to fix every nut and bolt.

Now that you have the check, you can do whatever you want. If the only damage was the frame/wheels, you could buy a new frame and wheels and swap everything. You could buy a cheaper used bike and pocket the difference. You could quit cycling and keep the money.

This one of the very few times you come out ahead from insurance. Consider it a bonus for your time and aggravation.
 

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Confiscate is the wrong word. When an insurance company pays a claim like this, they in effect bought the property. If they did not ask for the bike, then do what you want.

Tig is right, it was not worth their time to pay someone to strip and sell the used parts.

Not considered fraud.
 

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Russian Troll Farmer
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I'm assuming that between saddle, seatpost, crankset, hubs, headset, brifters, etc., at least 2/3 of them are still in working order. Throwing them away would be like flushing money down the toilet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thank you for the responses everyone, each of you hit on the thoughts I was trying to get to. The medical side of this is still a ways to getting sorted out so regardless of what I can/can't do I'll be sitting on it until everything has run it's course. Moral of the story, dealing with accidents sucks even if you're reimbursed for them.
 

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In the early 1980s an inattentive driver performed a last second left turn in front of me (opposite direction) an destroyed my bike (as well as left me needing 50 stitches in the face). The insurance company paid off quickly and assumed ownership of the old bike. They then sold it to the local pro shop for $100. The owner was a good friend of mine and he sold me the bike for $105. Since only the frame and fork were totaled I used the old parts to build up a bike for my girlfriend.
 

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I had this exact thing happen to me.

I kept possession of the old bike, including the mangles wheels and fork. I 'donated' the pretzel'd Shimano RS-11 wheels to a local co-op to re-use whatever they could (probably just the hubs). The frame looked fine, but I wouldn't have ridden it and couldn't in good conscious sell it or even give it away, so left it as the shop for the guys to cut up and use for displays (makes for great conversation piece when I stop by).

Everything else was re-usable - seat/post, bars, shifters, brakes, derailleurs, drive train, pedals, etc... Since my favorite local shop sold me a frameset for a better bike at cost, I transferred the majority of the components onto the new frame and put the balance towards a wheel upgrade.

As far as whether it's legal or not, I seriously doubt it could be considered fraud (in a legal sense) unless you were specifically instructed in writing to turn them over or trash them, and didn't.
 
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