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Discussion Starter #1
I have an older BH Ultralight RC road bike that I use to ride to work. It's about 13 miles round-trip.

I usually ride in sidewalks, and the problem is that most of these sidewalks are in horrible condition since they're not maintained; they are uneven, cracked, and extremely bumpy. The seat that came with the bike (a Prologo) already broke in the front, and I bought a cheapish cover that adds a bit of cushioning. Unfortunately, it's just not enough. The bike doesn't have any suspension so that doesn't help.

My question: what seat should I buy to make my rides more comfortable? I use padded shorts, but it'd be even better if a seat was so comfortable that it didn't even need bike shorts.

Thanks.
 

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Russian Troll Farmer
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Since riding on the sidewalk is illegal just about everywhere, why not just ride on the street? I think you'll find it's smoother, and you won't get a ticket or evil stares from pedestrians.
 

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gotta agree with NTT, riding on sidewalks is an invitation for trouble.

and fwiw, cycling shorts are 'padded' to absorb sweat, not provide a cushion for your butt.
 

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If the bike has room for 28mm tires, go with that and don't pump them up too hard. This will give more "cushioning" then most any seat.

But yes, as stated, riding on the sidewalks sounds like trouble to me.
 

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What you really need is a bike with much wider tires. Something like 36-44mm with a steel frame would absorb most any sidewalk bumps.

I don't do much "town" riding but when I do it's on my Salsa steel frame with 42mm tires at about 35-40psi. Makes jumping curbs, scooting over gravel or dirt, and even an occasional flight of stairs completely doable. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
gotta agree with NTT, riding on sidewalks is an invitation for trouble.

and fwiw, cycling shorts are 'padded' to absorb sweat, not provide a cushion for your butt.
Trust me, if I could ride on the street, I'd ride on the street. I HATE riding in abandoned and uneven sidewalks full of mud and rocks with crater-size holes.

Unfortunately, it's illegal to ride on a main highway. Even if it were legal (which is not), drivers here don't respect cyclists.
 

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Banned Sock Puppet
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A much better idea than changing you saddle would be changing your tires to the widest that will fit in your frame and reduce your pressures.
 

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gotta agree with NTT, riding on sidewalks is an invitation for trouble.

and fwiw, cycling shorts are 'padded' to absorb sweat, not provide a cushion for your butt.
Padded shorts are designed to reduce chafing. Gel padded shorts are designed to cushion your butt.
 

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Get a new bike! You're riding BH Ultralight RC. It's not made to ride on sidewalks that are uneven, cracked, and extremely bumpy.
I use to have BH... I don't think it'd fit wider than 25mm tires.

If you must ride on these sidewalks, you need a bike with 30mm or larger tires at lower air pressure.
 

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Russian Troll Farmer
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A much better idea than changing you saddle would be changing your tires to the widest that will fit in your frame and reduce your pressures.
A much better idea would be to either change your route, or change your bike. Eleven miles on sidewalks sounds like an extremely punishing ride without a full-suspension bike, and one where taking a city bus would be an improvement. A longer route on pavement would also be an improvement.
 

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Since riding on the sidewalk is illegal just about everywhere
Simply not true. Varies widely by jurisdiction and in most places, the only "illegal" sidewalks are in downtown/business districts.

That said, the solution here is putting the widest tires that will fit on the bike and inflating them to the lowest pressure that will avoid pinch flats.
 

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Simply not true. Varies widely by jurisdiction and in most places, the only "illegal" sidewalks are in downtown/business districts.

That said, the solution here is putting the widest tires that will fit on the bike and inflating them to the lowest pressure that will avoid pinch flats.
^^^This. Many states do not categorize bicycles as vehicles. There are very few state laws prohibiting bicycles on sidewalks. Most prohibitions are at the municipal level.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks all. I understand that it really isn't an issue with the seat.

But... I still have to change the seat since the one that I have is broken and I have to replace it.

My question: what seat do you guys recommend for my type of ride?
 

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Thanks all. I understand that it really isn't an issue with the seat.

But... I still have to change the seat since the one that I have is broken and I have to replace it.

My question: what seat do you guys recommend for my type of ride?
Seats are a personal thing and nobody can recommend a seat for someone else - eapecially not strangers on the internet. Personally I love the Selle Anatomica. More padding doesn't make a better saddle, nor will it absorb bumps.
 

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Russian Troll Farmer
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For "your type of ride", I'd make the following suggestions:

1) The most direct route is often the worst route for cycling. Just because Waze says a certain route with a car is the fastest route doesn't make it a good choice for a bike. Riding down residential roads is much safer, and often takes just about as long.

2) A true road bike is a lousy bike for commuting. For taking broken city pavement (as well as the occasional sidewalk), something that has tires at least 28mm wide is needed, probably even wider. Where I live, I'd say 38mm tires are minimal, which means you're riding either a hybrid, touring bike, gravel bike, or MTB.

As for the saddle; the problem newbies make is that they look for padding. All the padding in the world will just compress under your fat ass after the first mile. What you need are 2 things: a good shaped saddle, and one with the proper width. Then, it needs to be correctly oriented, between fore-aft settings, as well as having the nose at the right angle. We have literally hundreds of posts on THAT subject here.
 
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